Farming assistant app Agrolly wins IBM’s Call for Code contest

The innovative platform will be a one-stop-shop for farmers seeking out more information on what to plant and when.

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An autonomous combine–again, smaller and lighter than conventional farm machinery–harvesting HFHa’s first crop in September 2017.

Image: HandsFree Hectare

Agrolly, a platform built to help farmers in emerging markets, was chosen as the winner of IBM’s 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge.

Agrolly provides farmers with a bevy of information about weather patterns and crop characteristics, giving them advice on what would be the best thing to plant during certain times of the year. The platform also has ways for farmers to connect with experts as well as ways for them to share information and tools with each other.

During the virtual “2020 Call for Code Awards: A Global Celebration of Tech for Good” event, Agrolly was announced as the winner of the annual competition, which brings together the world’s brightest

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Dust increases reflect farming practices and climate trends reminiscent of the lead-up to the 1930s Dust Bowl — ScienceDaily

Got any spaces left on that 2020 bingo card? Pencil in “another Dust Bowl in the Great Plains.” A study from University of Utah researchers and their colleagues finds that atmospheric dust levels are rising across the Great Plains at a rate of up to 5% per year.

The trend of rising dust parallels expansion of cropland and seasonal crop cycles, suggesting that farming practices are exposing more soil to wind erosion. And if the Great Plains becomes drier, a possibility under climate change scenarios, then all the pieces are in place for a repeat of the Dust Bowl that devastated the Midwest in the 1930s.

“We can’t make changes to the earth surface without some kind of consequence just as we can’t burn fossil fuels without consequences,” says Andy Lambert, lead author of the study and a recent U graduate. “So while the agriculture industry is absolutely important, we

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Inside Singapore’s huge bet on vertical farming

From the outside, VertiVegies looked like a handful of grubby shipping containers put side by side and drilled together. A couple of meters in height, they were propped up on a patch of concrete in one of Singapore’s nondescript suburbs. But once he was inside, Ankesh Shahra saw potential. Huge potential. 

Shahra, who wears his dark hair floppy and his expensive-looking shirts with their top button casually undone, had a lot of experience in the food industry. His grandfather had founded the Ruchi Group, a corporate powerhouse in India with offshoots in steel, real estate, and agriculture; his father had started Ruchi Soya, a $3 billion oilseed processor that had been Shahra’s training ground.

By the time Shahra was introduced to VertiVegies founder Veera Sekaran at a friend’s party in 2017, he was hungry to make his own entrepreneurial mark. A previous attempt had involved sourcing organic food from around

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Mohali centre develops technology for eco-friendly, economic farming method : The Tribune India

Vijay Mohan

Tribune News Service

Chandigarh, October 11

The Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC), Mohali, has developed the technology for aquaponic cultivation of plants, which is not only environment-friendly but also has high socio-economic benefits for the farming community.

Aquaponics is an emerging technique in which both fish as well as plants complement each other to sustain and grow. The fish waste provides organic food for plants and the plants naturally filter the water which is used to replenish the fish tank. There is no requirement for the use of soil and fertilisers.

“The process is completely organic, increases the productivity of the given land, saves water and also augments the farmers’ income,” Dr PK Khosla, director C-DAC, said, adding: “The technology has been developed and suitable protocols have been evolved for scientists and farmers,” he added.

A pilot project to develop the technology was awarded to C-DAC

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New technology to boost fish farming in J&K : The Tribune India

Jammu, October 10

The J&K Administration is introducing biofloc technology (BFT) to boost fish farming in the potential areas across the union territory, a senior government official has said.

Navin Choudhary, Principal Secretary, Fisheries, Animal-Sheep Husbandry, Agriculture, Horticulture and Cooperative, said the department planned to promote the novel technology among the farming community and unemployed youths for adoption as an income-generating fish farming unit.

Considered as a new “blue revolution” in aquaculture, Biofloc is a profitable method of fish farming and has become very popular all around the word as an alternative to open pond fish farming.

It is a low-cost way in which toxic materials for the fish such as ammonia, nitrate and nitrite can be converted into feed.

The principle of this technique is to recycle nutrients.

“In view of the multiple benefits of the BFT system over the conventional pond fish culture system and to demonstrate this

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Behind China’s ‘pork miracle’: how technology is transforming rural hog farming | Environment

In November 2018, I travelled to Guangzhou, a city of about 14 million people in southern China. Late autumn is the time for making lap yuk, a type of preserved pork that is a local speciality, and across town I would often spot slabs of meat hanging from high-rise apartment balconies, tied up with string and swaying next to shirts and sheets left out to dry. To make lap yuk, a piece of raw pork belly is soaked in a blend of rice wine, salt, soy sauce and spices, then hung out to cure in the damp, cold autumn air. The fat becomes translucent and imparts a savoury-sweet taste to any stir-fried vegetable dish. A relative of mine claims that only southern China can make preserved pork like this. The secret is the native spores and bacteria that are carried on the wind there.

Guangzhou was the first

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