Facebook, Amazon And Apple Shares Are Down On Fears Of Government Forcing Big Tech Breakup

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Broad-market indexes are up Tuesday after U.S. President Donald Trump returned to the White House following his three-day hospitalization at Walter Reed Medical Center, but tech stocks are down as the House’s antitrust report on big tech firms nears release.

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The tech-heavy Nasdaq, down .1%, is the only major index down this morning following a Monday evening report from Politico that revealed a draft of the U.S. House of Representatives’ antitrust report on big tech firms, slated for release later this week, contains provisions that would make it easier to break up Silicon Valley giants Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Google-parent Alphabet.

Each of the big four tech firms are down close to 1% this morning, with all of them now down

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Goldman Sachs Says Election Fears Are Overblown; Suggests 2 Stocks to Consider

November 3 is just around the corner, and Wall Street’s gaze has locked in on the race to the White House. Biden currently leads in the polls, but it’s still anyone’s race.  

Now, with President Trump’s COVID-19-related hospitalization rocking the last leg of the 2020 presidential election campaign, and Senate control also up for grabs, fears regarding a divided government are circling the Street. 

That said, this might not be such a bad thing, if you ask Goldman Sachs. “A divided government scenario would lead to a smaller change in interest rates and a reduction in political uncertainty,” the firm’s chief equity strategist David Kostin wrote. The strategist argues that such an outcome could push the S&P 500 to 3,700, which would reflect an 11% gain, with the index reaching 4,000 by mid-2021. 

But what will happen if Biden comes out on top? Kostin believes a blue wave wouldn’t be

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US sets restrictions on China’s biggest chipmaker, citing military fears

US wariness of Chinese tech firms was underlined again Friday, when the Commerce Department reportedly sent a letter to companies in the states telling them they must get a license before exporting certain goods to China’s largest chipmaker, because of concerns about military use of technology.



a traffic light hanging off the side of a building: The Beijing branch of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation. Su Weizhong/Getty Images


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The Beijing branch of Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation. Su Weizhong/Getty Images

The Commerce Department said in the letter that exports to Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation “may pose an unacceptable risk of diversion to a military end use in the People’s Republic of China,” according to a report Saturday by The New York Times.

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Last year, the US placed restrictions on companies selling gear to Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, over concerns about Huawei’s relationship with the Chinese government and fears that its equipment could be used to spy on other countries and companies.

And popular video app TikTok, owned

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Hitting the Books: The invisible threat that every ISS astronaut fears

how to astronaut

Workman

Excerpted from How to Astronaut: An Insider’s Guide to Leaving Planet Earth by Terry Virts (Workman). © 2020.


For all the emergency training I went through as an astronaut, I never expected to be holed up in the Russian segment of the ISS, the hatch to the US segment sealed, with my crew waiting and wondering—would the space station be destroyed? Was this the end? As we floated there and pondered our predicament, I felt a bit like the guy in the Alanis Morissette song “Ironic,” who was going down in an airplane crash, thinking to himself, “Now isn’t this ironic?” This is how we ended up in that situation.

Every space station crew trains for all types of emergencies—computer failures, electrical shorts, equipment malfunctions, and more serious fire and air leak scenarios. However, on the International Space Station, the most dangerous of all is an ammonia leak. In

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Wall Street ends higher as tech rally squashes virus fears, but S&P down for week

(Reuters) – Technology stocks again rode to Wall Street’s rescue on Friday, lifting the main indexes more than 1%, but the Dow and the S&P 500 still posted their longest weekly losing streaks in a year as fears of a slowing economy sparked an almost month-long rout.

Investors started buying beaten-down shares after the Nasdaq confirmed a corrective phase earlier this month and the S&P 500 on an intra-day basis briefly broke that barrier this week.

Both the Dow and S&P 500 notched their fourth straight weekly declines, the longest weekly losing streak since August 2019. The Nasdaq closed higher for the week after falling the previous three, and is now up 22% for the year. The S&P 500 is up a bit more than 2% for the year.

Investors are looking at the long term and believe technology remains the investment of choice, said Edward Moya, senior market analyst

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Tech leads Wall Street higher as virus fears rise

(Reuters) – Wall Street’s main indexes rose on Friday, led by technology-related stocks, but were still on track for their longest weekly losing streak in a year as fears about the coronavirus’ impact on the economy dented investor sentiment.

FILE PHOTO: Traders wearing masks work, on the first day of in person trading since the closure during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., May 26, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

Shares of tech mega-caps including Facebook Inc FB.O, Alphabet Inc GOOGL.O, Amazon.com Inc AMZN.O, Apple Inc AAPL.O and Netflix Inc NFLX.O, which tend to outperform during economic uncertainty, climbed between 0.5% and 2.3%.

The information technology index .SPLRCT jumped another 1.4% as investors ditched value-linked stocks .IVX on signs of a slowdown in the broader economic recovery.

All the three major U.S. stock

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Amazon’s home drone sparks surveillance fears, but it may be the least-invasive thing Amazon makes

  • Amazon on Thursday unveiled a camera-mounted drone that can fly around inside your house, called the Ring Always Home Cam.
  • The drone can launch itself from its base and automatically patrol your house if it’s alerted to a disturbance by a paired Ring alarm.
  • The announcement prompted privacy fears around the increased incursion by big tech surveillance products into people’s homes.
  •  The tiny drone is arguably one of Amazon’s less invasive products.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Amazon’s latest security wheeze — a miniature drone that flies around your home looking for burglars — has prompted horrified responses about the potential for increased Big Tech surveillance.

Amazon unveiled the Ring Always Home Cam on Thursday, a tiny drone that can fly around your home and check for disturbances.

The $250 device sits inside the home in a cradle, and will launch itself if triggered by a paired Ring

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