Science vs humanities in Australia’s university fee shake-up | Australia

Canberra, Australia – University students enrolling in degrees in the humanities, law and economics in Australia will see their course fees more than double next year under legislation that has just passed the upper house which the government says will ensure higher education produces “job-ready graduates”.

Under the plan, a four-year Bachelor of Arts degree will cost as much as 58,000 Australian dollars ($41,619) from 2021, an increase of 113 percent compared with 2020.

The bill passed the Senate on Thursday after securing the votes of minority parties, all but guaranteeing it will become law when it returns to the lower house in a week or so.

Federal Education Minister Dan Tehan has said the changes are necessary because students need “to make more job-relevant choices” and study more science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) courses to ensure they become better prepared for the job market.

The bill comes as

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Apple halts fee on Facebook paid online events

Apple will no longer collect a 30% fee on Facebook’s paid online events.


James Martin/CNET

For the remainder of 2020, Apple will stop collecting a 30% App Store tax for Facebook’s paid online events feature, which is geared toward helping small businesses make money during the coronavirus pandemic. On Friday, Facebook said businesses can now keep all their earnings from paid online events, minus applicable taxes, until Dec. 31. 

Facebook Pay will be used to process all paid online events purchases, which means businesses and creators won’t have to pay that 30% App Store tax through the rest of the year. 

“This is a difficult time for small businesses and creators, which is why we are not collecting any fees from paid online events while communities remain closed for the

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Apple Temporarily Waives 30% Fee for Facebook Paid Live Events, but Not for Gaming Creators

In an unusual move, Apple has agreed to not collect the App Store’s 30% “tax” on purchases made through Facebook’s app for live paid events — but only through the end of 2020. Moreover, Apple will still take a 30% cut of paid livestreams from video-game creators using the paid-livestream feature.

The ongoing clash of tech titans is the latest in the public fight some app developers are waging against Apple over its App Store business practices, which they say are unfair.

Facebook complained that Apple agreed only to a short moratorium on collecting in-app fees for paid live events, which it launched last month. For its part, Facebook says it won’t take a cut of creators or businesses’ revenue for livestreaming events until at least August 2021, citing economic hardships inflicted by the COVD pandemic.

“Apple has agreed to provide a brief, three-month respite after which struggling businesses will

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Apple drops its App Store fee for events forced online by the pandemic

Apple is waiving the customary 30% fee it charges businesses that sell tickets to online events in the company’s App Store for the rest of the year.

Apple suspended the fee to give businesses affected by the coronavirus pandemic more time to adapt to operating almost entirely online, a spokesman told CNBC. App store developers such as Airbnb, the home-rental company, has expressed interest in holding more events online, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Earlier this week, Apple agreed to exempt Facebook events from the 30% fee. This summer, the social media company introduced paid online events as a way for small businesses to make some money. Facebook said it would not be taking a cut of event fees until August 2021. Apple’s suspension of its 30% fee means that sellers of online events will be able to keep all their earnings, minus taxes. 

Apple expanded the fee suspension on

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Apple Drops 30% Fee for Facebook Paid Live Events, Excludes Gamers

In an unusual move, Apple has agreed to not collect the App Store’s 30% “tax” on purchases made through Facebook’s app for live paid events — but only through the end of 2020. Moreover, Apple will still take a 30% cut of paid livestreams from video-game  creators using the paid-livestream feature.

The ongoing clash of tech titans is the latest in the public fight some app developers are waging against Apple over its App Store business practices, which they say are unfair.

Facebook complained that Apple agreed only to a short moratorium on collecting in-app fees for paid live events, which it launched last month. For its part, Facebook says it won’t take a cut of creators or businesses’ revenue for livestreaming events until at least August 2021, citing economic hardships inflicted by the COVD pandemic.

“Apple has agreed to provide a brief, three-month respite after which struggling businesses will

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Google Reportedly Plans to Update Play Store Guidelines to Emphasize Use of Its Billing System With 30% Fee

Google plans to introduce updated Play Store guidelines that emphasize the requirement for most apps to use the company’s billing system for in-app purchases as early as next week, according to Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman.


While this requirement has existed for years, the report notes that some major developers like Netflix, Spotify, and Tinder have circumvented the rule by prompting customers to pay directly using a credit card, rather than their Play Store account, bypassing Google’s 30 percent commission for in-app purchases.

In a statement, Google said that it is always working with developers to clarify its Play Store policies, but it did not elaborate on any forthcoming changes:

As an open platform, Android allows multiple app stores. In fact, most Android devices come with at least two stores right out of the box, and users can install others. For developers who choose to distribute their apps on Google Play,

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