Somerset Academy Canyons installs new turf field

Somerset Academy Canyons Middle and High School will have a new look in the upcoming months as it has created an opportunity for student-athletes to compete on a new synthetic turf field.

The west Boynton Beach charter school, which consists of students from sixth through 12th grade, will be the first school in the state to install the T 1/4 u00baCool evaporative cooling technology to reduce field temperature, combat extreme heat and make the field playable and safer for athletes.

Somerset Academy Canyons is preparing to have its soccer teams utilize the new synthetic turf field first for the upcoming season. The field will be utilized by several sports programs at the school, including football. The installation is expected to be completed by December.

Michael Feierstein, who serves as the school’s athletic director, said he is excited for the school.

“The cooling system will make all the difference and the

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Unusually shallow earthquake ruptures in Chinese fracking field

earthquake
Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain

An unusually shallow earthquake triggered by hydraulic fracturing in a Chinese shale gas field could change how experts view the risks of fracking for faults that lie very near the Earth’s surface.


In the journal Seismological Research Letters, Hongfeng Yang of The Chinese University of Hong Kong and colleagues suggest that the magnitude 4.9 earthquake that struck Rongxian County, Sichuan, China on 25 February 2019 took place along a fault about one kilometer (0.6 miles) deep.

The earthquake, along with two foreshocks with magnitudes larger than 4, appear to be related to activity at nearby hydraulic fracturing wells. Although earthquakes induced by human activity such as fracking are typically more shallow than natural earthquakes, it is rare for any earthquake of this size to take place at such a shallow depth.

“Earthquakes with much smaller magnitudes, for example magnitude 2, have been reported at such

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In a field where smaller is better, researchers discover the world’s tiniest antibodies — ScienceDaily

Researchers at the University of Bath in the UK and biopharma company UCB have found a way to produce miniaturised antibodies, opening the way for a potential new class of treatments for diseases.

Until now, the smallest humanmade antibodies (known as monoclonal antibodies, or mAbs) were derived from llamas, alpacas and sharks, but the breakthrough molecules isolated from the immune cells of cows are up to five times smaller. This is thanks to an unusual feature of a bovine antibody known as a knob domain.

The potential medical implications of the new antibodies’ diminutive size are huge. For instance, they may bind to sites on pathogens that regular antibody molecules are too large to latch on to, triggering the destruction of invasive microbes. They may also be able to gain access to sites of the body which larger antibodies can’t.

Antibodies consist of chains of amino acids (the building blocks

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Make Your Next Pumpkin Patch Visit A Math And Science Field Trip

ACROSS AMERICA — There’s a contest for everything, and pumpkins are no exception. You may be rightfully proud of that enormous pumpkin in your patch, but unless it weighs upward of 2,500 pounds, you’re not flirting with any kind of record.

Turning this year’s pumpkin patch visit on its end — and let’s face it, everything about 2020 is upended — why not give the kids in your coronavirus pandemic classroom a field trip?

Oodles of STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — lessons are possible while trudging around the hills of pumpkins.

Teach them a little about pi — not pumpkin pie, but the mathematical formula to calculate the circumference of a circle — or how to convert pounds to kilograms.

The largest pumpkin ever recorded in the United States was grown by Steve Geddes. The pumpkin that the Boscawen, New Hampshire, man grew in 2018 tipped the

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Black scientists call out racism in the field and counter it

The recent episode of a White woman calling the police on a Black birder in New York’s Central Park shocked many people. But for Black environmental scientists, worrying about whether they are likely to be harassed or asked to justify their presence while doing fieldwork is a familiar concern.

Tanisha Williams, a botanist at Bucknell University, knows which plants she’s looking for. But after being questioned by strangers in public parks, Williams, who is Black, has started carrying her field guides with her.

“I’ve been quizzed by random strangers,” she said. “Now I bring my wildflower books and botanical field guides, trying to look like a scientist. It’s for other people. I wouldn’t otherwise lug these books.”

Overt harassment and subtle intimidation during fieldwork compound the discrimination that Black scientists and those from other underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds already feel in academic settings.

Now researchers in the environmental sciences

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Mediacom Becomes First U.S. Cable Operator to Conduct Field Trial of New 10G Platform

AMES, Iowa–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Mediacom Communications today provided a firsthand look at the future of connected-living during a smart home event powered by the next generation of broadband technology.

Conducted in partnership with CableLabs and NCTA – The Internet & Television Association, the tour of the Mediacom 10G Smart Home represented the first U.S. field trial of the cable industry’s new 10G™ platform. The next great leap forward for broadband, 10G is a powerful, capital-efficient technology breakthrough that will ramp up from the 1 gigabit offerings of today to speeds of 10 gigabits per second and beyond in the coming years.

“Mediacom worked with CommScope and other leading tech companies to move 10G from a laboratory concept to a real world consumer experience,” said Mediacom CTO, JR Walden. “Similar to our rapid deployment of 1-Gig across our national network in 2017, the beauty of 10G is that it’s extremely scalable

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Scientists advance the field of precision health with the development of therapeutic artificial cells. — ScienceDaily

New research by an international team of chemists describes a new type of artificial cell that can communicate with other cells within the body — with potential applications in the field of smart pharmaceuticals.

“In the future, artificial cells like this one could be engineered to synthesizes and deliver specific therapeutic molecules tailored to distinct physiological conditions or illnesses — all while inside the body,” explained Sheref Mansy, professor in the University of Alberta’s Department of Chemistry, who co-authored this study in collaboration with researchers at the University of Trento, Italy.

The artificial cells work by detecting changes in their environment within the body. In response, the artificial cell creates and releases a protein signal that influences the behaviour of other cells within the body. “In this way, the changing needs of the host would be rapidly met in a manner that does not flood the entire organism with drug

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