A study detailing the processes that control mole size may help scientists find new ways to prevent skin cancer from growing — ScienceDaily

Moles stop growing when they reach a certain size due to normal interactions between cells, despite having cancer-associated gene mutations, says a new study published today in eLife.

The findings in mice could help scientists develop new ways to prevent skin cancer growth that take advantage of the normal mechanisms that control cell growth in the body.

Mutations that activate the protein made by the BRAF gene are believed to contribute to the development of skin cancer. However, recent studies have shown that these mutations do not often cause skin cancer, but instead result in the formation of completely harmless pigmented moles on the skin. In fact, 90% of moles have these cancer-linked mutations but never go on to form tumours. “Exploring why moles stop growing might lead us to a better understanding of what goes wrong in skin cancer,” says lead author Roland Ruiz-Vega, a postdoctoral researcher at

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Astronomers find x-rays lingering years after landmark neutron star collision

UMD astronomers find x-rays lingering years after landmark neutron star collision
Researchers have continuously monitored the radiation emanating from the first (and so far only) cosmic event detected in both gravitational waves and the entire spectrum of light. The neutron star collision detected on August 17, 2017, is seen in this image emanating from galaxy NGC 4993. New analysis provides possible explanations for X-rays that continued to radiate from the collision long after other radiation had faded and way past model predictions. Credit: E. Troja

It’s been three years since the landmark detection of a neutron star merger from gravitational waves. And since that day, an international team of researchers led by University of Maryland astronomer Eleonora Troja has been continuously monitoring the subsequent radiation emissions to provide the most complete picture of such an event.


Their analysis provides possible explanations for X-rays that continued to radiate from the collision long after models predicted they would stop. The study also reveals

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Scientists find upper limit for the speed of sound — ScienceDaily

A research collaboration between Queen Mary University of London, the University of Cambridge and the Institute for High Pressure Physics in Troitsk has discovered the fastest possible speed of sound.

The result- about 36 km per second — is around twice as fast as the speed of sound in diamond, the hardest known material in the world.

Waves, such as sound or light waves, are disturbances that move energy from one place to another. Sound waves can travel through different mediums, such as air or water, and move at different speeds depending on what they’re travelling through. For example, they move through solids much faster than they would through liquids or gases, which is why you’re able to hear an approaching train much faster if you listen to the sound propagating in the rail track rather than through the air.

Einstein’s theory of special relativity sets the absolute speed limit

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Quibi struggling to find buyer after rejection by Apple SVP Eddy Cue

Quibi founder Jeffrey Katzenberg is reportedly having a hard time finding a buyer for the struggling short-form video streaming service, after being rebuffed by Apple.

Short-form video streaming service Quibi is said to be exploring “strategic options,” including the possibility of a sale, after failing to hit initial subscriber targets. Thus far, however, it has come up short.

According to The Information, Katzenberg has recently pitched the possibility of acquiring Quibi several technology and entertainment companies. Some of the executives he approach include Eddy Cue, Apple’s senior vice president of internet software and services. Katzenberg was turned down.

Quibi was floated as a possible target of an Apple takeover earlier in 2020. Along with Apple, Katzenberg’s pitch was also rejected by WarnerMedia CEO Jason Kilar and Facebook app chief Fidji Simo, The Information reported.

Part of the reason why buyers keep turning the service down is that it doesn’t

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To fight climate change, should we mine the deep sea? USF wants to find out.

Ancient rocks lie across vast fields miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean.

Far from people, but not entirely out of reach, they contain metals such as cobalt, used in batteries for technology like electric cars. They are numerous, about the size of meatballs or potatoes, and formed over millions of years.

These stones may hold a key to fighting climate change, according to a contingent of entrepreneurs who want to mine them. To wean the world off fossil fuels that worsen global warming, scientists say, will require a lot of batteries. That’s where the rocks could help.

But nothing is so simple in the abyss.

Opponents argue that rushing into deep-sea mining risks destroying a pristine wilderness, killing species that have lived free of human intrusion for millennia. They say miners would disrupt a habitat that might hold other value for society, potentially home to microbes that fight

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Augmented reality goggles could help military dogs find bombs, chemicals

Oct. 6 (UPI) — Researchers have developed augmented reality goggles that would allow handlers to give commands to military working dogs while staying out of harm’s way.

The military often uses dogs to scout areas for explosive devices and hazardous materials and to assist in rescue operations.

But working dogs need handlers who can give them commands while they work — typically by using hand signals or laser pointers, which can pose a safety risk by providing a light source.

Being present to give those commands can put soldiers in harm’s way, and generating a light source can also be dangerous in some situations.

Handlers have tried audio communication — using a camera and walkie talkie placed on the dog — but the verbal commands can be confusing for the dog.

So researchers funded by the Army’s Small Business Innovation Research program and managed by the Army Research Office have

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Netflix just made it easier to find something new to watch

Netflix is trying to surface more new shows in one place. The company announced that it’s going to group some of its content rows together into a tab called New & Popular. This section will only show up on TV devices and is rolling out widely after first being tested in April.



graphical user interface, website


© Netflix


The section will group together the New on Netflix row, the Coming Soon row, and the Top 10 row, which is debuted in February and is updated daily. It’ll also include a new row called Worth The Wait that’ll give subscribers a preview of the shows coming to the platform between the next 15 and 365 days.

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The Worth The Wait section is especially important for Netflix because it gives users a way to save and set reminders for upcoming shows. That might keep them from leaving the service, even if there isn’t anything

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Researchers find ‘Queen of the Ocean’ ancient great white shark off Nova Scotia coast

Researchers off the coast of Nova Scotia found a nearly 2-ton great white shark believed to be roughly 50 years old, dubbing her a true “Queen of the Ocean.”

Coming in at more than 17 feet long and 3,541 pounds, she is the largest shark the group has been able to sample in the Northwest Atlantic, according to a Friday Facebook post by OCEARCH, a non-profit marine research organization. She’s been named Nukumi for “the legendary wise old grandmother figure” of the Indigenous Mi’kmaq people, a First Nations group native to that region of Canada.

Chris Fischer, the OCEARCH expedition leader, called Nukumi a “proper Queen of the Ocean” in a video log posted Saturday.

“She’s probably 50-years-old and certainly her first litters of pups she would have been having 30 years ago are also making babies, really humbling to stand next to a large animal like that,” Fischer said.

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Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers

Scientists find evidence of exotic state of matter in candidate material for quantum computers
An illustration of the crystal structure of ruthenium trichloride showing the simple honeycomb lattice of ruthenium ions and chlorine ions. The twisted octahedra formed by chlorine around the electron spin of each ruthenium atom are mirror images of each other. This twist is key to the compound’s unusual behavior, which is evidence that it may contain an example of a quantum spin liquid. Credit: Courtesy of Arkady Shekhter/ National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

Using a novel technique, scientists working at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have found evidence for a quantum spin liquid, a state of matter that is promising as a building block for the quantum computers of tomorrow.


Researchers discovered the exciting behavior while studying the so-called electron spins in the compound ruthenium trichloride. Their findings, published today in the journal Nature Physics , show that electron spins interact across the material, effectively lowering

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Scientists find promising ‘superhabitable’ planets that may be ‘better’ than Earth

This illustration shows an Earth-size planet orbiting a distant star.


NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech

When you title a research paper “In Search for a Planet Better than Earth,” you’re not messing around. Earth, the only place we know for sure hosts life, sets a high bar for all other planets. 

Washington State University (WSU) geobiologist Dirk Schulze-Makuch led a study published in the journal Astrobiology last month. The paper identifies two dozen exoplanets (planets located outside our solar system) that could be “superhabitable” worlds more suitable for life than our own.

The researchers created a set of criteria for planets to qualify as potentially superhabitable. This list includes an age of between 5 billion and 8 billions years old (Earth is about 4.5 billion years old) and a location within a star’s habitable zone where liquid

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