Get Real Launches New Advisory Firm To Help Clients Imagine And Leverage Virtual Reality And Augmented Reality Technology To Improve The Way They Work

CHICAGO, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Get Real, a Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality (VR/AR) advisory firm, publicly launched today to help businesses and not for profits implement VR and AR technologies that dramatically improve and scale their organizations. Clients will benefit from Get Real’s team of professionals that combine several decades of experience in leveraging emerging technology and integrated platforms to solve real-world business challenges and create sustainable competitive advantages.

“We’re excited to help our clients discover Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in its early stages, establish themselves as leaders amongst their peers, and maintain a competitive edge for years to come,” said Rob Merrilees, Get Real Co-Founder. “Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality technology is ready for business applications today. It has the ability to change how organizations train, collaborate, market, visualize data, gather, educate, and raise money.”

Get Real works with clients to match them with

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From iPhones to e-axles: how one tech firm is pushing into electric vehicles

(Reuters) – The miniature motors that make iPhones buzz on silent helped power Japan’s Nidec to become a 1.5-trillion-yen ($14 billion) company.

FILE PHOTO: Nidec Corp’s logo is pictured at an earnings results news conference in Tokyo, Japan, July 25, 2018. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon/File Photo

In recent years, Nidec’s founder Shigenobu Nagamori has turned his attention to autos, and a technology which turns electricity stored in the battery into propulsion power.

This technology, called an e-axle or e-drive, is emerging as a new competitive front as the auto industry shifts to electric vehicles. By 2030, Nagamori says he wants a 35% slice of a global e-axle market that is forecast to be worth $20-30 billion a year by then, up from an estimated $2.8-$3 billion now.

He is betting that electric cars will follow the same route as room aircons, washing machines and computers, with key components, such as motor systems

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Brazilian Conversational Commerce Firm Take Raises US$100m To Drive International Expansion

Brazilian technology company Take has raised a US$ 100 million round from private equity fund Warburg Pincus to support its international expansion plans. The deal, announced on Wednesday (7) sees the investor acquiring a relevant minority stake in the company in what is one of the largest Series A rounds that have taken place in Brazil.

Headquartered in Belo Horizonte, capital of the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais, Take develops a software-as-a-service (SaaS) offering that enables companies to communicate with their customers via apps such as Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp. The model evolves the traditional customer relationship management framework into what it defines as “conversational commerce”, whereby firms maintain an ongoing dialog with their customer base.

Take’s technology uses tools such as artificial intelligence and data analytics to allow companies to not only service their customers and seamlessly

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Flux: Business technology firm helps clients keep working in pandemic

Resilience is part of the business plan at San Antonio-based DOCUmation. The digital imaging and business technology company handled the pandemic like it handles any other shift in the industry — it found a way to adapt.

As essential businesses looked for ways to minimize health risks for their employees, DOCUmation introduced contact-less thermal scanners that took a person’s temperature.

Co-Presidents Hunter Woolfolk and Preston Woolfolk say they learned early on about the need to adapt from their grandfather, Lou Scantland, who still serves as board chairman.

They watched as their father, Scott Woolfolk, and uncle, Lee Scantland, navigated an ever-changing industry. The company mpoved from selling copy machines to opening a print shop and offering information technology, software and phone support.

The brothers, who were born 14 months apart, worked every summer beginning in middle school, but it wasn’t until they graduated from Abilene Christian University that they were

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Business technology firm helps clients keep working in pandemic

Resilience is part of the business plan at San Antonio-based DOCUmation. The digital imaging and business technology company handled the pandemic like it handles any other shift in the industry — it found a way to adapt.

As essential businesses looked for ways to minimize health risks for their employees, DOCUmation introduced contact-less thermal scanners that took a person’s temperature.

Co-presidents Hunter Woolfolk and Preston Woolfolk say they learned early on about the need to adapt from their grandfather, Lou Scantland, who still serves as board chairman.


They watched as their father, Scott Woolfolk, and uncle, Lee Scantland, navigated an ever-changing industry. The company mpoved from selling copy machines to opening a print shop and offering information technology, software and phone support.

The brothers, who were born 14 months apart, worked every summer beginning in middle school, but it wasn’t until they graduated from Abilene Christian University that they were

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Apple is suing a recycling firm accused of reselling its products

  • Apple is suing a Canadian recycling company that it says resold upward of 100,000 iPhones, iPads, and Apple Watches instead of breaking them down.
  • The recycling company says that theft of the devices was carried out by three “rogue” employees and that it wasn’t aware of it.
  • Apple is unconvinced by the defense, arguing in its suit that “GEEP’s officers and directors knew or ought to have known about the scheme.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Apple is suing a Canadian recycling company that it accuses of reselling upward of 100,000 iPhones, iPads, and Apple watches.

The suit, reported by The Logic on Wednesday, was filed in January against the Ontario-based recycling firm Global Electric Electronic Processing, which Apple contracted in 2014 to break down its products. 

Apple noticed the missing devices after an audit of a warehouse indicated devices were being taken to parts of the building

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Cybersecurity firm Censys hires new technology chief

Fresh off an investment round that netted the company $15.5 million, Ann Arbor cybersecurity firm Censys Inc. has a new executive running innovation and technical strategy.

The company announced Monday that Derek Abdine, a veteran of cybersecurity companies, had been hired as the company’s new chief technology officer. Abdine, 37, will remain based in Los Angeles but travel to Ann Arbor quarterly once the COVID-19 pandemic subsides.

“I joined Censys because companies still face significant challenges securing systems despite a robust cybersecurity industry and there is a shared belief that one of the core issues for this stems from problems with internet-facing configuration and computing infrastructure,” Abdine said in a news release. “Censys is one of the few companies I’ve seen that is truly innovating in cybersecurity, and their team is loaded with some of the brightest, focused people in the industry.”

Prior to joining Censys, Abdine worked as the

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Quarter of employees at gaming firm Ubisoft report misconduct

A quarter of employees at the French video game giant Ubisoft have been victims of professional misconduct at work or were witnesses to it, according to a survey carried out by the group following allegations of sexual misconduct.

The creator of hit games including Assassin’s Creed and Far Cry launched a probe and announced the departure of its chief creative officer and other senior executives in July after claims about the group’s toxic work culture.

Chief executive and co-founder Yves Guillemot, who admitted earlier this year that the group had “fallen short”, said that 2,000 employees had participated in “listening sessions” and nearly 14,000 had responded to an anonymous survey.

The results showed that “roughly 25 percent have experienced or witnessed some form of workplace misconduct in the past two years, and that one in five do not feel fully respected or safe in the work environment”, said a statement

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NEC to buy Swiss software firm Avaloq for $2.2 billion

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s NEC Corp said on Monday it will buy Swiss financial software company Avaloq Group AG for 2.05 billion Swiss francs ($2.2 billion), a move that will spearhead its entry globally into finance software.

FILE PHOTO: A logo of NEC Corp is pictured at CEATEC (Combined Exhibition of Advanced Technologies) JAPAN 2016 at the Makuhari Messe in Chiba, Japan, October 3, 2016. REUTERS/Toru Hanai/File Photo

NEC will acquire unlisted Avaloq, Europe’s top provider of financial asset management software, from Avaloq’s founder and employees and private equity firm Warburg Pincus, which has a 45% stake and engineered the sale.

Avaloq, whose customers include Deutsche Bank and HSBC, reported sales of 610 million Swiss francs ($664 million) last year, 70% of which came from Europe.

The deal will allow NEC to offer cloud services acquired through the merger combined with its own biometrics and

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Apple sues recycling firm for stealing and reselling 100,000 iPhones, iPads and Watches

Apple is suing former recycling partner GEEP Canada — now a part of Quantum Lifecycle Partners — for allegedly stealing and reselling at least 103,845 iPhones, iPads and Watches that it was hired to disassemble. “At least 11,766 pounds of Apple devices left GEEP’s premises without being destroyed – a fact that GEEP itself confirmed,” reads a portion of Apple’s complaint, as reported by The Logic (via AppleInsider).

Apple sent the recycling firm over 500,000 iPhones, iPads, and Apple Watches between January 2015 and December 2017, according to The Logic’s report. When Apple did an audit, it discovered 18 percent of those devices were still accessing the internet through cellular networks. That 18 percent doesn’t count Apple devices without a cellular radio, so it’s possible an even higher percentage of the gadgets were resold.

Apple seeks to obtain at least $31 million Canadian dollars (roughly $22.7 million USD)

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