Camera in fish eagle nest documents amazing activities over weeks [Video]

Osprey, known as fish eagles are enormous birds of prey, second in size only to bald eagles. They are found throughout North America, and they are more common in Canada than bald eagles are. Nesting on hydro poles and dead trees, they are always found near open water, as their primary source of food is fish. They are incredibly skilled at dive bombing from above to snatch a fish out of the water and carry it off to be eaten. They will often seize fish that are even heavier than they are. These osprey have just returned to Canada from their winter migration. A breeding pair have found their usual nest and they have taken up residence to start their family.

A nature enthusiast has found an ingenious way to install an action camera in the nest. The biggest challenge was that the cameras had a limited battery life and

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New technology to boost fish farming in J&K : The Tribune India

Jammu, October 10

The J&K Administration is introducing biofloc technology (BFT) to boost fish farming in the potential areas across the union territory, a senior government official has said.

Navin Choudhary, Principal Secretary, Fisheries, Animal-Sheep Husbandry, Agriculture, Horticulture and Cooperative, said the department planned to promote the novel technology among the farming community and unemployed youths for adoption as an income-generating fish farming unit.

Considered as a new “blue revolution” in aquaculture, Biofloc is a profitable method of fish farming and has become very popular all around the word as an alternative to open pond fish farming.

It is a low-cost way in which toxic materials for the fish such as ammonia, nitrate and nitrite can be converted into feed.

The principle of this technique is to recycle nutrients.

“In view of the multiple benefits of the BFT system over the conventional pond fish culture system and to demonstrate this

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Freed whale calf seen feasting on bunker fish off Montauk

The humpback calf whose tail was anchored to the bottom of the Atlantic off Jones Beach State Park for at least four days until a herculean rescue freed him from two tons of fishing gear is surviving — and, while not swimming normally, has been feasting on bunker fish off Montauk.

“It’s really great news; sometimes we can go for weeks, we can go for years, before we understand the fate of disentangled whale,” one of his lead rescuers, Scott Landry, director of the marine animal entanglement response team at the Center for Coastal Studies, a Provincetown, Massachusetts-based nonprofit, said by telephone.

The 4-year-old was seen swimming and identified on Aug. 19 and 22 by Arthur Kopelman, president, the Coastal Research & Education Society of Long Island, of West Sayville.

That was about three weeks after Landry, part of a multiagency team, succeeded in what he termed one of the

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Listeria in smoked fish — ScienceDaily

In 2018, 701 cases of severe invasive listeriosis were communicated to the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), which translates into 0.8 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Most listeriosis illnesses reported are severe and are associated with blood poisoning, meningitis or miscarriages, for example. In 2018, the disease was fatal in 5% of cases. Elderly people, people with weakened immune defences, pregnant women and their new-born babies are particularly vulnerable. Listeria can be found in a large variety of foods of plant and animal origin. Cold or hot-smoked fish are often contaminated and are, therefore, also suspected of transmitting this illness. Other fish products and seafood eaten raw, such as sushi, sashimi and oysters or cured products such as graved fish, may also be affected. “Pregnant women, elderly people or those with weakened immune defences should only eat fish and seafood that have been thoroughly heated,” says BfR President Professor Dr. Dr. Andreas … Read More

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Aerodynamicists reveal link between fish scales and aircraft drag — ScienceDaily

The team’s findings have been published in Nature: Scientific Reports: “Transition delay using biomimetic fish scale arrays,” and in the Journal of Experimental Biology: “Streak formation in flow over biomimetic fish scale arrays.”

Reducing drag means faster aircraft speeds and less fuel consumption — an important area of study for aerodynamicists such as Professor Bruecker, City’s Royal Academy of Engineering Research Chair in Nature-Inspired Sensing and Flow Control for Sustainable Transport, and City’s Sir Richard Oliver BAE Systems Chair for Aeronautical Engineering.

Through their biomimetic study, Professor Bruecker’s team has discovered that the fish-scale array produces a zig-zag motion of fluid in overlapping regions of the surface of the fish, which in turn causes periodic velocity modulation and a streaky flow that can eliminate Tollmien-Schlichting wave induced transition to reduce skin friction drag by more than 25 percent.

An examination of oil flow visualisation using computational fluid dynamics

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This ‘squidbot’ jets around and takes pics of coral and fish — ScienceDaily

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have built a squid-like robot that can swim untethered, propelling itself by generating jets of water. The robot carries its own power source inside its body. It can also carry a sensor, such as a camera, for underwater exploration.

The researchers detail their work in a recent issue of Bioinspiration and Biomimetics.

“Essentially, we recreated all the key features that squids use for high-speed swimming,” said Michael T. Tolley, one of the paper’s senior authors and a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at UC San Diego. “This is the first untethered robot that can generate jet pulses for rapid locomotion like the squid and can achieve these jet pulses by changing its body shape, which improves swimming efficiency.”

This squid robot is made mostly from soft materials such as acrylic polymer, with a few rigid, 3D printed

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Extinct megalodon confirmed as the biggest fish in the sea

megalodonillustration

This is an illustrated reconstruction of an adult megalodon.


Oliver E. Demuth

Of all the living fish in the sea, we know the whale shark to be the biggest. At up to eight or nine meters (roughly 28 feet), they eclipse all the other sharks alive in the ocean — and females reign supreme in the size stakes. But it certainly wasn’t always the case, as scientists have finally confirmed.

Published in Historical Biology, a study has confirmed that the now-extinct Otodus megalodon, or megatooth shark, once reached up to 15 meters (49 feet) in length — surpassing the present-day whale shark by almost seven meters (22 feet).

Generally portrayed as a gigantic monster of a shark in films like 2018’s The Meg, the real megalodon was a far cry from the 75

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