Animal study shows treatment blocks inflammation and protects lungs without killing the flu virus — ScienceDaily

The raging lung inflammation that can contribute to death from the flu can be stopped in its tracks by a drug derived from a naturally occurring human protein, a new animal study suggests.

In mouse studies, all untreated animals given a lethal dose of influenza died within days. All but one of the infected mice treated with the experimental therapy not only survived, but remained energetic and kept weight on — despite having high levels of the flu virus in their lungs.

The experimental treatment is a heavy dose of MG53, part of a family of proteins that plays an essential role in cell membrane repair. Already identified as a potential therapy for conditions ranging from Alzheimer’s disease to persistent skin wounds, MG53 was found in this study to prevent death from a lethal flu infection by blocking excessive inflammation — without having any effect on the virus itself.

The

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Why Trump’s viral Covid and flu misinformation is hard for Facebook and Twitter to stop

A perfect storm of medical misinformation and political disinformation is creating new challenges for the press, for social media platforms and for the public. Take just the events of the last few days. On the heels of his release from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, President Donald Trump stood on the balcony of the White House, removed his mask and then gave a short speech that was quickly uploaded to social media. “Maybe I’m immune, I don’t know,” he declared. The truth is, he is still very contagious. But the public declaration alarmed scientists, who are working to produce an effective and safe vaccine. Online, fans cheered that Trump had beaten Covid-19, even as he put his staff in danger.

A perfect storm of medical misinformation and political disinformation is creating new challenges for the press, for social media platforms, and for the public.

Trump followed up that appearance

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Facebook removes Trump post claiming COVID-19 is less deadly than flu

  • Facebook removed a post from President Donald Trump on Tuesday that falsely claimed COVID-19 was less deadly than the flu, CNN first reported.
  • In the post, Trump said COVID-19 was “far less lethal” than the flu in “most populations.” In fact, the US coronavirus death toll in the first nine months of 2020 would already make it the second-deadliest US flu season on record by far.
  • The post violated Facebook’s rules on COVID-19 misinformation, which bans false claims about the severity of the virus.
  • Trump posted the same message to Twitter, which did not remove the post but instead added a public-interest notice saying the tweet broke its rules on COVID-19 misinformation.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Facebook removed a post from President Donald Trump on Tuesday that falsely claimed COVID-19 was less deadly than the flu.

Facebook determined that Trump’s post violated its COVID-19 misinformation policies, which

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Facebook removes Trump post calling the coronavirus ‘less lethal’ than the flu

“Flu season is coming up! Many people every year, sometimes over 100,000, and despite the Vaccine, die from the Flu. Are we going to close down our Country? No, we have learned to live with it, just like we are learning to live with Covid, in most populations far less lethal!!!” Trump’s tweet and now-deleted Facebook post reads.

Trump on Monday night left Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he was being treated for covid-19. Earlier in the day, he posted on social media, “Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life.” That drew intense criticism online for what many saw as him downplaying the virus that has killed at least 209,000 people in the United States.

Neither Twitter nor Facebook took any action against the Monday post and did not respond to repeated requests for comment asking if it violated their policies against coronavirus misinformation.

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Findings point the way to developing a broad-spectrum flu drug — ScienceDaily

Researchers have identified two antibodies that protect mice against lethal infections of influenza B virus, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Together with an antibody that targets the other major kind of influenza viruses that infect people — influenza A — these antibodies potentially could form the basis of a broad-spectrum flu drug that could treat almost all flu cases.

The findings are published Sep. 24 in the journal Immunity.

“People forget that before COVID-19 hit last winter, we were already in the midst of a really bad influenza season, especially for children,” said co-senior author Ali Ellebedy, PhD, an assistant professor of pathology and immunology at Washington University. “Last year, influenza B viruses attacked much earlier in the season than usual and resulted in significant illness and death among children. We really need better treatments

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