Chemists create new crystal form of insecticide, boosting its ability to fight mosquitoes and malaria — ScienceDaily

Through a simple process of heating and cooling, New York University researchers have created a new crystal form of deltamethrin — a common insecticide used to control malaria — resulting in an insecticide that is up to 12 times more effective against mosquitoes than the existing form.

The findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), may provide a much-needed and affordable insecticide alternative in the face of growing resistance among mosquitoes.

“The use of more active crystal forms of insecticides is a simple and powerful strategy for improving commercially available compounds for malaria control, circumventing the need for developing new products in the ongoing fight against mosquito-borne diseases,” said Bart Kahr, professor of chemistry at NYU and one of the study’s senior authors.

“Improvements in malaria control are needed as urgently as ever during the global COVID-19 crisis,” added Kahr. “The number of

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Stacking and twisting graphene unlocks a rare form of magnetism

Stacking and twisting graphene unlocks a rare form of magnetism
Stacking monolayer and bilayer graphene sheets with a twist leads to new collective electronic states, including a rare form of magnetism. Credit: Columbia University

Since the discovery of graphene more than 15 years ago, researchers have been in a global race to unlock its unique properties. Not only is graphene—a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice—the strongest, thinnest material known to man, it is also an excellent conductor of heat and electricity.


Now, a team of researchers at Columbia University and the University of Washington has discovered that a variety of exotic electronic states, including a rare form of magnetism, can arise in a three-layer graphene structure.

The findings appear in an article published Oct. 12 in Nature Physics.

The work was inspired by recent studies of twisted monolayers or twisted bilayers of graphene, comprising either two or four total sheets. These materials were found to

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How a toxic chromium species could form in drinking water — ScienceDaily

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan, brought much-needed attention to the problem of potentially toxic metals being released from drinking water distribution pipes when water chemistry changes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology have investigated how hexavalent chromium, known as Cr(VI), can form in drinking water when corroded cast iron pipes interact with residual disinfectant. Their findings could suggest new strategies to control Cr(VI) formation in the water supply.

The metal chromium, known as Cr(0), is found in cast iron alloy, which is the most widely used plumbing material in water distribution systems. As pipes corrode, a buildup of deposits, known as scale, forms on the pipes’ inner walls. Trace chemicals in water can react with scale, forming new compounds that could be released into the water. Some of these compounds contain Cr(VI), which, at high doses, can cause lung cancer, liver damage, reproductive issues and developmental

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Key control mechanism allows cells to form tissues and anatomical structures in the developing embryo

Sticking together
Determination of neural progenitor cell-cell de-adhesion forces using micropipette aspiration. Credit: IST Austria

Under a microscope, the first few hours of every multicellular organism’s life seem incongruously chaotic. After fertilization, a once tranquil single-celled egg divides again and again, quickly becoming a visually tumultuous mosh pit of cells jockeying for position inside the rapidly growing embryo.


Yet, amid this apparent pandemonium, cells begin to self-organize. Soon, spatial patterns emerge, serving as the foundation for the construction of tissues, organs and elaborate anatomical structures from brains to toes and everything in between. For decades, scientists have intensively studied this process, called morphogenesis, but it remains in many ways enigmatic.

Now, researchers at Harvard Medical School and the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria have discovered a key control mechanism that cells use to self-organize in early embryonic development. The findings, published in Science on Oct. 2, shed light on a

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Why Some Stars Never Form Planets

The planetary paradigm has shifted so quickly and so radically in the last quarter century that is easy to forget that only a few decades ago, one would be hard-pressed to find any professional astronomer who would stake their careers on the idea that most stars harbor planets. But although the overwhelming majority of stars may harbor some form of planet, not all stars are capable of forming planets.

During the first two decades of looking for planets that circle

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Mechanical Technology Incorporated Announces Filing of Form 10 Registration Statement & Leadership Announcements

ALBANY, N.Y., Sept. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Mechanical Technology, Incorporated (“MTI” or the “Company”), a publicly traded company (OTC Pink: MKTY) headquartered in Albany, New York, announces today that it has filed a Form 10 Registration Statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) to register its common stock under Section 12 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”). Once the Form 10 goes effective, which, unless withdrawn, will be on November 29, 2020, MTI will once again be subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act and will resume filing annual, quarterly, and current reports, and annual proxy statements with the SEC. The Company also expects that its common stock will move from being quoted on the OTC Pink – Current Information tier to the OTCQB Venture Market tier of the OTC Markets Group quotation system upon effectiveness of the Form

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Black holes so big we don’t know how they form could be hiding in the universe

Black holes can get big … really big. But just how big? It’s possible they could top out at over a trillion times more massive than the sun. That’s 10 times bigger than the largest known black hole so far.



a close up of a light in the dark: Illustration of a black hole.


© Provided by Live Science
Illustration of a black hole.

But could these monsters truly exist in our universe? A team of researchers has come up with a plan to go hunting for them. And if they exist, they could help us solve the mysteries of how the first stars appeared in the cosmos.

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Related: The biggest black hole findings

The demographics of the dark

If you want to go shopping for black holes in the universe, unfortunately you only have two basic sizes: kind of small and gigantic. You know that frustrating feeling you get when the online store is out of your size of that amazing

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Facebook critics form oversight board ahead of 2020 election

Some of Facebook’s most vocal critics are tired of waiting for its independent oversight board — so they’re starting their own.



a person wearing a suit and tie


© Provided by NBC News


A group of about 25 experts from academia, civil rights, politics and journalism announced Friday that they have formed a group to analyze and critique Facebook’s content moderation decisions, policies and other platform issues in the run-up to the presidential election and beyond.

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The group, which calls itself the Real Facebook Oversight Board, plans to hold its first meeting via Facebook Live on Oct. 1. It will be hosted by Recode founder Kara Swisher, a New York Times contributing opinion writer.

Facebook is still working on creating its own oversight board, first described in April 2018 by CEO Mark Zuckerberg as an independent “Supreme Court” for content moderation decisions. Facebook’s board won’t launch in time to make any decisions during the presidential

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Epic, Spotify and other Apple critics form coalition to take on App Store rules

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Angela Lang/CNET

More than a dozen app makers and other companies have joined together to form the Coalition for App Fairness, a nonprofit group that’s taking aim at Apple and its App Store rules. Among the founding members are Spotify, Epic Games and Match Group, all of which have been vocal critics of the fees Apple charges developers. 

“As enforcers, regulators, and legislators around the world investigate Apple for its anti-competitive behavior, The Coalition for App Fairness will be the voice of app and game developers in the effort to protect consumer choice and create a level playing field for all,” said Horacio Gutierrez, head of global affairs at Spotify, in a release on Thursday.

The coalition comes as Apple is locked in a public battle with Fortnite developer Epic Games.

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