Revealing the reason behind jet formation at the tip of laser optical fiber

Revealing the Reason Behind Jet Formation at the Tip of Laser Optical Fiber
The observation of water jets in experiments and the schematics of the jet formation mechanism. Credit: Junnosuke Okajima, Tohoku University

When an optical fiber is immersed in liquid, a high-temperature, high-speed jet is discharged. Researchers expect this to be applied to medical treatment in the future. Now, a research team from Russia and Japan has explored this phenomenon further and revealed the reasons behind the jet formation.


Lasers using a thin optical fiber and combined with an endoscope and catheter can be easily transported into deep areas of the body or inside blood vessels. Traditionally, affected areas or lesions are removed by generating heat inside the tissue through laser absorption—a process known as the photothermal effect.

Yet, hydrodynamical phenomena, such as microbubble formation or high-speed jet generation from the optical fiber, show immense medical promise.

The process of jet formation happens when the laser is irradiated to the water, causing

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Revealing the reason behind jet formation at the tip of laser optical fiber — ScienceDaily

When an optical fiber is immersed in liquid, a high temperature, high speed jet is discharged. Researchers expect this to be applied to medical treatment in the future. Now, a research team from Russia and Japan has explored this phenomenon further and revealed the reasons behind the jet formation.

Lasers using a thin optical fiber and combined with an endoscope and catheter can be easily transported into deep areas of the body or inside blood vessels. Traditionally, affected areas or lesions are removed by generating heat inside the tissue through laser absorption — a process known as the photothermal effect.

Yet, hydrodynamical phenomena, such as microbubble formation or high-speed jet generation from the optical fiber, show immense medical promise.

The process of jet formation happens when the laser is irradiated to the water, causing the water to boil and a vapor bubble to form at the tip of the optical

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Research has helped underpin the formation of a nature reserve in Vietnam

Research has helped underpin the formation of a nature reserve in vietnam
An endangered red-shanked douc langur (Pygathrix nemaeus) photographed in Khe Nuoc Trong. Credit: Bjornolesen.com/Viet Nature

Research by the University of Leeds and Utrecht University has helped secure the highest government protection for internationally-important Vietnamese forests. Over the past five years, conservation organization Viet Nature, and its partners World Land Trust, IUCN National Committee of the Netherlands (IUCN NL), Birdlife International and researchers from the University of Leeds and Utrecht University have been working to protect the Khe Nuoc Trong forests—the last substantial area of lowland forest in Vietnam.


In August, the Vietnamese government agreed to formally protect Khe Nuoc Trong’s 22,132-hectare tract of Annamite lowland evergreen forests as a Nature Reserve, the country’s highest standard of protection.

The move delivers a safer home for 40 globally threatened species brought to brink of extinction by loggers and poachers. This includes singing gibbons, the spectacular peacock-like crested argus birds and the critically

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A new 3D model could explain the formation of a hexagon storm on Saturn — ScienceDaily

With its dazzling system of icy rings, Saturn has been a subject of fascination since ancient times. Even now the sixth planet from the sun holds many mysteries, partly because its distance away makes direct observation difficult and partly because this gas giant (which is multiple times the size of our planet) has a composition and atmosphere, mostly hydrogen and helium, so unlike that of Earth. Learning more about it could yield some insights into the creation of the solar system itself.

One of Saturn’s mysteries involves the massive storm in the shape of a hexagon at its north pole. The six-sided vortex is an atmospheric phenomenon that has been fascinating planetary scientists since its discovery in the 1980s by the American Voyager program, and the subsequent visit in 2006 by the U.S.-European Cassini-Huygens mission. The storm is about 20,000 miles in diameter and is bordered by bands of winds

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Astronomers turn up the heavy metal to shed light on star formation

Astronomers turn up the heavy metal to shed light on star formation
Astronomers use galaxies near to Earth as a ‘local’ laboratory. Credit: ICRAR

Astronomers from The University of Western Australia’s node of the International Center for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) have developed a new way to study star formation in galaxies from the dawn of time to today.


“Stars can be thought of as enormous nuclear-powered processing plants,” said lead researcher Dr. Sabine Bellstedt, from ICRAR.

“They take lighter elements like hydrogen and helium, and, over billions of years, produce the heavier elements of the periodic table that we find scattered throughout the universe today. The carbon, calcium and iron in your body, the oxygen in the air you breathe, and the silicon in your computer all exist because a star created these heavier elements and left them behind,” Bellstedt said. “Stars are the ultimate element factories in the universe.”

Understanding how galaxies formed stars billions of years ago requires the

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Iodic acid influences cloud formation at the North Pole — ScienceDaily

The Arctic is warming two or three times faster than the rest of the planet. This amplified warming is due to several factors, but the relative importance of each one remains still unclear. “We do know, however, that clouds could play an important role,” says Julia Schmale, an EPFL professor who heads the Extreme Environments Research Laboratory and holds the Ingvar Kamprad Chair. “By reflecting the sun’s rays back into space or trapping heat close to the Earth’s surface like a blanket, clouds help either cool off or warm up the planet.”

Schmale — along with scientists from the Paul Scherrer Institute’s Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry and Stockholm University’s Department of Environmental Science and Bolin Centre for Climate Research — spent several weeks collecting data near the North pole in August and September 2018, as part of the US-Swedish expedition Arctic Ocean 2018 on board the Swedish icebreaker Oden. The

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Iodic acid influences cloud formation at the North Pole

arctic
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

The Arctic is warming two or three times faster than the rest of the planet. This amplified warming is due to several factors, but the relative importance of each one remains still unclear. “We do know, however, that clouds could play an important role,” says Julia Schmale, an EPFL professor who heads the Extreme Environments Research Laboratory and holds the Ingvar Kamprad Chair. “By reflecting the sun’s rays back into space or trapping heat close to the Earth’s surface like a blanket, clouds help either cool off or warm up the planet.”


Schmale—along with scientists from the Paul Scherrer Institute’s Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry and Stockholm University’s Department of Environmental Science and Bolin Center for Climate Research—spent several weeks collecting data near the North pole in August and September 2018, as part of the US-Swedish expedition Arctic Ocean 2018 on board the Swedish icebreaker Oden. The

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MDC Partners Announces Formation of Global Technology Group

NEW YORK, Sept. 28, 2020 /CNW/ — MDC Partners Inc. today announced the formation of a new division within the Company, the Global Technology Group, to introduce a bold new vision for technology infrastructure designed to unleash collaboration at global scale. The Group taps a roster of seasoned intra-network technology leaders who, under the direction of John Georgatos, Global Chief Information Officer, will drive global strategy across the network in areas including security, systems design, and cloud architecture.

The Global Technology Group is the latest in a series of actions MDC Partners has taken to transform the company into the most modern global marketing partner to clients, equipping the company with the state-of-the-art IT infrastructure needed to deliver custom-built solutions that are global in scale, digital in nature, and reliant on agile, borderless collaboration.

“MDC’s global network transformation has innovation at its core,” said Mark Penn, Chairman

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