Researchers study the invasive frog’s role in Galapagos food web

Researchers study the invasive frog’s role in Galapagos food web
Fowler’s snouted treefrog Scinax quinquefasciatus was introduced on the Galápagos archipelago in the late 1990s. Credit: Senckenberg/Ernst

“I have taken pains to verify this assertion, and have found it true that frogs, toads, and newts are absent from most oceanic islands”—thus states Charles Darwin in his well-known work “On the Origin of Species.” For a long time, this observation by the famous naturalist also held true for the Galápagos Islands, which are inextricably linked to his name. “This only changed with the arrival of Fowler’s snouted treefrog Scinax quinquefasciatus on the archipelago in 1997 or 1998,” explains Dr. habil. Raffael Ernst of the Senckenberg Natural History Collections in Dresden, and he continues, “In our study, we examined the interactions of this newcomer with the local, primarily endemic fauna on Galápagos.”

Ernst and his colleagues were curious to find out what role this 33-to-38-millimeter-long frog plays within the island fauna’s food

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Citizen scientists reveal frogs’ initial response to ‘black summer’ bushfires

Surviving the flames: citizen scientists reveal frogs’ initial response to ‘black summer’ bushfires
The threatened Southern Barred Frog, one of the frogs recorded calling in burnt areas post-fire using FrogID. Credit: Dr Jodi Rowley

New research from the Australian Museum (AM) and UNSW Sydney published today in Conservation Science and Practice reveals that many frog species in southeastern Australia have initially survived following the unprecedented bushfires in late 2019 and early 2020. By area burnt, this fire season was the largest in southeastern Australia since European occupation and as a result, it had a dramatic impact on biodiversity, including frogs.


Frogs are one of the most threatened groups of animals on earth and face many risks, including the growing threat of fires due to the climate crisis.

“However, we don’t know enough about frogs’ response to fire, and there are limited studies on the impact of fire on Australian frogs—so we urgently needed real-time data to understand how frogs fared after the fires,

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