AMD Targets PC Gamers With New Ryzen 5000 Desktop CPUs Arriving on Nov. 5

(Credit: AMD)

AMD’s new desktop CPUs, the Ryzen 5000 series, will start arriving on Nov. 5 with the goal of offering the best PC gaming performance. 

The main improvements involve the Zen 3 architecture, which is designed to boost the max clock speeds and increase the instructions per clock by 19 percent. The layout on the Ryzen chips has also been redesigned so that the cores have direct access to the L3 cache for lower latency, enabling faster PC gaming. 

“Zen 3 increases our overall lead in performance,” said AMD CEO Lisa Su during a Thursday event. “It increases our lead in power efficiency, and also now it delivers the best single-threaded performance and gaming performance as well.”

The Ryzen 5000 family will first arrive in four processors: 

  • The Ryzen 9 5950X: a 16-core, 32-thread chip for $799

  • The Ryzen 9 5900X: a 12-core, 24-thread chip for $549

  • The Ryzen

Read More
Read More

Nuraphone Takes Aime At Gamers With Its New Gaming Bundle

If you own a pair of Nuraphone headphones – and you really should – you’ll be pleased to know that the world’s first personalized pair of headphones now have an optional boom microphone that’s been designed specifically with gamers in mind.

The award-winning Nuraphone product has established Nura as a leader in personalised sound and can change how you experience music. A personalised audio profile is becoming increasingly popular in the headphone market but Nura were the pioneers and thanks to Nuraphone’s self-learning engine, it’s the only headphone that automatically learns and adapts to a user’s unique hearing. 

Now the Nura music experience is expanding into the world of gaming with the release of the new Nuraphone Gaming Microphone. Featuring

Read More
Read More

APC targets console and PC gamers with its Back-UPS Pro Gaming uninterruptible power supply

Credit: APC

Whether you game on an Xbox, a Playstation, or a PC, nothing is more irritating than getting knocked out of a game by an electrical blackout. At best, you’ll get penalized for quitting a multiplayer game. At worst, you’ll see smoke rising from your gear because it got fried from a power surge when the electricity came roaring back.

APC, a division of Schneider Electric and one of the bigger names in uninterruptible power supplies, has announced a brand-new unit aimed squarely at gamers. Not familiar with the concept of a UPS? You can take a deep dive in our product guide here, but at a 5,000-foot level, it’s essentially a very big battery that will supply back-up power in the event of a blackout. The idea is to provide your equipment—including your broadband gateway and router—enough time to shut down gracefully, and give you a few minutes

Read More
Read More

The Best Gaming Chairs For Serious Gamers

In a bid to find the best gaming chair on the market, you may find yourself quickly overwhelmed by the options available to you. And in a surprisingly disconcerting number of cases, gaming chairs from several companies often look identical, with no clear difference between models. Finding the right gaming chair, therefore, takes some legwork. And it generally starts with understanding what a gaming chair is — and how it differs from traditional office chairs.

For one, you’ll quickly discover that gaming chairs have decidedly different designs than their office alternatives. They’re often fashioned after race car seats and come with bright and colorful accents. And although many office chairs use fabric and leather, gaming chairs may use a variety of materials to deliver comfort.

Indeed, long-term comfort is one of the hallmarks of a gaming chair. The companies behind them, like SecretLab, Herman Miller and others, (correctly)

Read More
Read More

NVIDIA Just Gave Call Of Duty Gamers With GeForce Cards An Edge

One of the technologies NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang unveiled during the GeForce RTX 30-series launch event was NVIDIA Reflex. For those unfamiliar with it, NVIDIA Reflex is latency reduction technology that’s designed to minimize input lag, sometimes called input latency or end-to-end latency. That’s a fancy way of defining how long it takes for something to happen on-screen after a mouse click or keyboard input.

NVIDIA Reflex works by streamlining a few steps along the rendering pipeline to reduce overall latency. NVIDIA’s software tweaks to enable Reflex make more efficient use of available CPU and GPU resources and minimize driver overhead, which according to NVIDIA, can reduce latency by up to 50% in games that are updated to properly support the technology. That means when a gamer clicks their mouse button to fire a weapon or whips their mouse around to

Read More
Read More

APC targets gamers with its Back-UPS Pro Gaming UPS

Whether you game on an Xbox, a Playstation, or a PC, nothing is more irritating than getting knocked out of a game by an electrical blackout. At best, you’ll get penalized for quitting a multiplayer game. At worst, you’ll see smoke rising from your gear because it got fried from a power surge when the electricity came roaring back.

APC, a division of Schneider Electric and one of the bigger names in uninterruptible power supplies, has announced a brand-new unit aimed squarely at gamers. Not familiar with the concept of a UPS? You can take a deep dive in our product guide here, but at a 5,000-foot level, it’s essentially a very big battery that will supply back-up power in the event of a blackout. The idea is to provide your equipment—including your broadband gateway and router—enough time to shut down gracefully, and give you a few minutes to save

Read More
Read More

Apple Drops 30% Fee for Facebook Paid Live Events, Excludes Gamers

In an unusual move, Apple has agreed to not collect the App Store’s 30% “tax” on purchases made through Facebook’s app for live paid events — but only through the end of 2020. Moreover, Apple will still take a 30% cut of paid livestreams from video-game  creators using the paid-livestream feature.

The ongoing clash of tech titans is the latest in the public fight some app developers are waging against Apple over its App Store business practices, which they say are unfair.

Facebook complained that Apple agreed only to a short moratorium on collecting in-app fees for paid live events, which it launched last month. For its part, Facebook says it won’t take a cut of creators or businesses’ revenue for livestreaming events until at least August 2021, citing economic hardships inflicted by the COVD pandemic.

“Apple has agreed to provide a brief, three-month respite after which struggling businesses will

Read More
Read More