It’s Time For Startups To Use AI To Battle Tech Giants In Patent Wars

Technology giants such as Alibaba and IBM are eating startup innovators’ lunch. These behemoths are seeking to devour even more market share by publishing patents at unprecedented speed in emerging technologies such as blockchain.

As some of the richest companies on the planet, the corporations have the resources to manage the laborious search of existing patents and to overcome the outdated administrative hurdles so that they can file for intellectual property rights.

Patents are definitely old school. Patent laws started with the rise of the nation-state, so they began in the 18th century and were then fully developed in the 19th century. Some changes may have been made to reflect new technologies, but the basic patent laws haven’t evolved to meet the needs of the 21st century.

We’re patenting ideas based on today’s high-tech of artificial intelligence and blockchain with laws that were established centuries ago.

All this puts early-growth

Read More
Read More

Dow gains 251 points as tech giants rally and stimulus hopes persist


  • US stocks rose on Monday as Democrats and Republicans inched closer to a stimulus compromise.
  • Mega-cap companies including Apple and Amazon led indexes higher as investors rushed to the growth favorites.
  • President Trump urged Republicans to speed up Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation to the Supreme Court so that they can pass a new stimulus bill before Election Day.
  • Investors also prepared for earnings season. Citigroup and JPMorgan are set to kick off reporting on Tuesday.
  • Oil futures sank as operations temporarily halted by Hurricane Delta resumed. West Texas Intermediate crude fell as much as 3.8%, to $39.04 per barrel.
  • Watch major indexes update live here.

US equities extended their rally into a new week as investors pushed tech giants higher.

Apple surged ahead of a Tuesday event widely expected to unveil the next generation of iPhones. Amazon climbed as it kicked off its Prime Day sale

Read More
Read More

eSIM Technology Market Next Big Thing: Major Giants Deutsche Telekom, Gemalto, Sierra Wireless, STMicroelectronics | Oct 12, 2020

Edison, NJ — (SBWIRE) — 10/12/2020 — Latest research document on ‘eSIM Technology ‘market is added in AMA database providing detailed insights on growth factors and future strategies. The study breaks market by key regions that includes North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific with country level break-up and provide volume* and value related cross segmented information by each country. Some of the important players from a wide list of coverage used under bottom-up approach are Deutsche Telekom AG (Germany), Gemalto NV (Netherlands), Giesecke & Devrient GmbH (Germany), Infineon Technologies AG (Germany), NTT DOCOMO INC. (Japan), NXP Semiconductors N.V. (Netherlands), Sierra Wireless, Inc. (Canada), Singapore Telecommunications Limited (Singapore), STMicroelectronics (Switzerland), Telefónica, S.A. (Spain)

Request a sample report @ https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/sample-report/123572-global-esim-technology-market

What is eSIM Technology Market?
eSIM (Embedded sim) is programmable SIMs that allow you to switch carriers without changing the physical card in your device. The initial specification eSIM is by GSMA in 2013

Read More
Read More

Tech giants have skirted regulation because of how monopolies are defined by law. Democrats now want to rewrite those laws.



a close up of a logo: Business Insider


© Business Insider
Business Insider



Jeff Bezos standing in front of a television: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies via video conference during the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law hearing on Online Platforms and Market Power in the Rayburn House office Building, July 29, 2020. Graeme Jennings-Pool/Getty Images


© Provided by Business Insider
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies via video conference during the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law hearing on Online Platforms and Market Power in the Rayburn House office Building, July 29, 2020. Graeme Jennings-Pool/Getty Images

  • Now that House Democrats have completed a sweeping antitrust investigation into Facebook, Apple, Amazon, and Google, they’re prepared to introduce new laws to curb the tech giants’ power.
  • The 449-page report published by the House Antitrust Subcommittee on Tuesday, as well as public statements by Democrats on the heels of the report, signal how they might go about changing the laws.
  • Antitrust court decisions in recent decades have focused on consumer welfare, but Democrats say laws need to be updated given that many tech companies don’t charge consumers for their products and have wide-ranging impacts on workers and other businesses.
  • Meanwhile, Republicans
Read More
Read More

Ancient Sharks’ Cannibalistic Behavior May Have Helped Them Become Giants

KEY POINTS

  • Megalodons grew to be up to 50 feet in length
  • The prehistoric sharks were the biggest among the carnivorous or non-planktivorous shark species
  • Researchers say a unique behavior called intrauterine cannibalism may have helped megalodons grow very large

The ancient megalodon sharks’ predatory behavior inside the womb might have helped them achieve their gigantic size, a new study shows. The shark species grew to be up to 50 feet in length before going extinct about 3.6 million years ago.

In a study published in the journal Historical Biology, a team of researchers explained that most sharks give birth through a method known as ovoviviparity, where the embryos develop inside eggs that remain inside the mother’s body until they are ready to be hatched. In some aggressive shark types like lamniform, the early-hatched embryos often eat the unhatched eggs, a behavior called intrauterine cannibalism, the researchers noted. Megalodons belong

Read More
Read More

CEOs of 3 tech giants to testify at Oct. 28 Senate hearing

title=

This combination of 2018-2020 photos shows, from left, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. They are expected to testify in an Oct. 28, 2020 Senate hearing on tech companies’ control over hate speech and misinformation on their platforms.

AP

The CEOs of technology giants Facebook, Google and Twitter are expected to testify for an Oct. 28 Senate hearing on tech companies’ control over hate speech and misinformation on their platforms.

The Senate Commerce Committee voted last week to authorize subpoenas for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai of Google and Twitter’s Jack Dorsey to force them to testify if they didn’t agree to do so voluntarily. Spokespeople for the companies said Monday that the CEOs will cooperate.

The hearing “must be constructive and focused on what matters most to the American people: how we work

Read More
Read More

CEOs of 3 Tech Giants to Testify at Oct. 28 Senate Hearing | Washington, D.C. News

By MARCY GORDON, AP Business Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEOs of technology giants Facebook, Google and Twitter are expected to testify for an Oct. 28 Senate hearing on tech companies’ control over hate speech and misinformation on their platforms.

The Senate Commerce Committee voted last week to authorize subpoenas for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai of Google and Twitter’s Jack Dorsey to force them to testify if they didn’t agree to do so voluntarily. Spokespeople for the companies said Monday that the CEOs will cooperate.

The hearing “must be constructive and focused on what matters most to the American people: how we work together to protect elections,” Twitter said in a tweet in its policy channel.

The hearing will come less than a week before Election Day. It marks a new bipartisan initiative against Big Tech companies, which have been under increasing scrutiny in Washington and from state

Read More
Read More

CEOs of 3 social media giants to testify at Senate hearing

The hearing “must be constructive and focused on what matters most to the American people: how we work together to protect elections,” Twitter said in a tweet in its policy channel.

The hearing will come less than a week before Election Day. It marks a new bipartisan initiative against Big Tech companies, which have been under increasing scrutiny in Washington and from state attorneys general over issues of competition, consumer privacy and hate speech.

The executives’ testimony is needed “to reveal the extent of influence that their companies have over American speech during a critical time in our democratic process,” said Sen. Roger Wicker, a Mississippi Republican who heads the Commerce Committee.

Facebook, meanwhile, is expanding restrictions on political advertising, including new bans on messages claiming widespread voter fraud. The new prohibitions laid out in a blog post came days after President Donald Trump raised the prospect of mass fraud

Read More
Read More

Cannibalism in the womb may have helped make megalodon sharks giants

The largest sharks ever to hunt in Earth’s oceans may have gotten so big thanks to their predatory behavior in the womb, scientists report October 5 in Historical Biology.

The idea emerged from a study that first analyzed the sizes and shapes of modern and ancient shark teeth, using those data to estimate body sizes of the fish. Paleobiologist Kenshu Shimada of DePaul University in Chicago and colleagues focused on an order of sharks called lamniformes, of which only about 15 species still exist today, including fierce, fast great white and mako sharks as well as filter-feeding basking sharks (SN: 8/2/18).

Well over 200 lamniform species existed in the past, some of them quite large, Shimada says. But none is thought to have rivaled Otodus megalodon, commonly called megalodon, which lived between about 23 million and 2.5 million years ago. Determining just how giant these creatures were

Read More
Read More

Google Play gets new rules, Apple launches app marketing tools, EU looks to rein in tech giants

Welcome back to This Week in Apps, the TechCrunch series that recaps the latest OS news, the applications they support and the money that flows through it all.

The app industry is as hot as ever, with a record 204 billion downloads and $120 billion in consumer spending in 2019. People are now spending three hours and 40 minutes per day using apps, rivaling TV. Apps aren’t just a way to pass idle hours — they’re a big business. In 2019, mobile-first companies had a combined $544 billion valuation, 6.5x higher than those without a mobile focus.

In this series, we help you keep up with the latest news from the world of apps, delivered on a weekly basis.

Google changes its app store rules, too



a hand holding a cell phone: Google Play Store screen


© Provided by TechCrunch
Google Play Store screen

Google Play Store screen

Just a couple of weeks ago, Apple revised its App Store rules

Read More
Read More