Teachers play a critical role in shaping girls’ future as coders

The Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work.

The big idea

It doesn’t take long to help girls see a future for themselves in computer science, but it depends largely on how good their teachers are at recognizing the skills the girls have in coding, which is basically writing language for computers. We found that girls ages 10 to 12 can come to see themselves as coders in as little as a week. And there are diverse roles within the world of coding that allow girls with various personalities and skill sets to see themselves as coders. However, if educators recognize girls only for when they play a background role and help others, but not when they are more assertive and confident, then they may not develop their assertiveness and confidence in a way that enables them to succeed as coders.

To reach this conclusion, my colleagues

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Girls benefit from doing sports — ScienceDaily

Girls — but not boys — who participate actively in school sports activities in middle childhood show improved behaviour and attentiveness in early adolescence, suggests a new Canadian study published in Preventative Medicine.

“Girls who do regular extracurricular sports between ages 6 and 10 show fewer symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at age 12, compared to girls who seldom do,” said Linda Pagani, a professor at Université de Montréal’s School of Psychoeducation.

“Surprisingly, however, boys do not appear to gain any behavioural benefit from sustained involvement in sports during middle childhood,” said Pagani, who led the study co-authored by her students Marie-Josée Harbec and Geneviève Fortin and McGill University associate medical professor Tracie Barnett.

As the team prepared their research, “it was unclear to what extent organized physical activity is beneficial for children with ADHD symptoms,” recalled Pagani.

“Past studies have varied widely in quality, thus blurring the true

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New Research From Accenture and Girls Who Code Outlines Steps to Double the Number of Women in Technology in 10 Years

Joint report reveals just eight percent of women of color say it’s easy to thrive in technology

An inclusive culture is key to unlocking opportunities for women who are studying and working in technology, and holds the potential to double their number over the next 10 years, according to a joint research report by Accenture (NYSE: ACN) and Girls Who Code, an international nonprofit working to close the gender gap in technology.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200929005390/en/

Accenture and Girls Who Code outline how much cultural practices can boost women in technology (Photo: Business Wire)

The report, “Resetting Tech Culture,” analyzed the journey for women in technology from college to mid-career. While there are many reasons women abandon a career in technology, the highest percentage of respondents — 37% — cite company culture as the leading cause.

The research shows that if every company

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