East Asia to Remain Prolific in Automotive Glass Market, CAGR to Rise at 4% through 2030

Automotive glass market is showing promising growth due to in numerous demand in electric car segment and other industries. East Asia is set to boost their production in the upcoming years with lucrative opportunities for manufacturers too.

DUBAI, UAE / ACCESSWIRE / October 14, 2020 / The automotive glass market is likely to surpass US$ 16.8 billion through the forecast period. Manufacturers and key players are regularly focussing on expanding sales opportunities in the market which will in turn widen value and revenue, thereby, paving a path for opportunities. Tough competition between players and inadequate standardization might hinder market growth which can act as key restraints in the market.

“Advancement in technology and increasing demand in electric segments or car manufacturing companies is promoting the market. Cost efficiency and access to technologies plays a key role in shaping the market scenario. The escalating need for passenger vehicles and widening sales

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How Garmin’s Fenix 6 Pro Power Glass Offers Near-Limitless Battery Life

Garmin released its first solar-charging watches in 2019. They use Power Glass to convert sunlight into electricity. However, the models that had it were not the ones most people want.

They were the chunkiest, most expensive watches in Garmin’s line-up. This changed in 2020 when Garmin added Solar as an option to the main Fenix 6 line and the Instinct, which is one of Garmin’s more affordable watches.

They launched with the catchy tagline that you could expect up to “unlimited” battery life. There are, as you might guess, some important caveats to this claim. However, Garmin Power Glass is a useful and clever piece of tech that makes a lot of sense for hikers, if not the average runner who will always use the Fenix 6 Pro Solar’s most accurate GPS-tracking mode.

What’s the claim?

Where does the

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A clearer view of what makes glass rigid — ScienceDaily

Researchers led by The University of Tokyo employed a new computer model to simulate the networks of force-carrying particles that give amorphous solids their strength even though they lack long range order. This work may lead to new advances in high-strength glass, which can be used for cooking, industrial, and smartphone applications.

Amorphous solids such as glass — despite being brittle and having constituent particles that do not form ordered lattices — can possess surprising strength and rigidity. This is even more unexpected because amorphous systems also suffer from large anharmonic fluctuations. The secret is an internal network of force-bearing particles that span the entire solid which lends strength to the system. This branching, dynamic network acts like a skeleton that prevents the material from yielding to stress even though it makes up only a small fraction of the total particles. However, this network only forms after a “percolation transition”

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