Spark Turns On 5G In Auckland And Offers A Glimpse Into The Future Of Smart Cities

Spark turned on 5G in downtown Auckland today and has
partnered with Auckland Transport (AT) to showcase some of
the latest in IoT (Internet of Things) technology and
demonstrate what the future could look like for Auckland’s
CBD with the power of 5G.

5G is expected to underpin
the widespread deployment of IoT technology with its
increased speeds, low latency (or lag) and reliability. To
bring this potential to life, Spark and AT have installed
IoT enabled infrastructure at Auckland’s Wynyard Quarter –
including 5G connected lighting, smart benches with charging
capability, smart bins, and parking sensors.

Spark
Technology Lead, Renee Mateparae said: “We are excited to
launch our commercial 5G network in downtown Auckland today,
building on the private network we have in place to support
Emirates Team New Zealand and the launch of Spark Race Zone
last month. Our

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On old film, a collector in Georgia uncovered a glimpse into Hawaii’s past from 1976

HONOLULU, Hawaii (HawaiiNewsNow) – A collector in Georgia recently purchased an old camera from an online auction, and it turned out to be more valuable than she expected.



a sign posing for the camera: The photos were taken in Hawaii in 1976 at a political rally at McKinley High School for John Craven who was running for Congress for the first time.


© Provided by Honolulu KHNL
The photos were taken in Hawaii in 1976 at a political rally at McKinley High School for John Craven who was running for Congress for the first time.

“Honestly, I wasn’t even looking to buy the camera, I was actually looking to buy the film,” said Atlanta camera collector Jodi Benaroch. “This kind of film has been discontinued many, many years ago, but I do have one or two other cameras that use it.”

Benaroch says she bought the old film and Kodak Instamatic camera from an eBay seller in Hawaii for about $60.

She says she noticed the number “8” on the back of the device, which meant there were someones’ photos inside.

“It will

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Here’s a first glimpse of China’s digital yuan



Yuan bank notes.


© Provided by Quartz
Yuan bank notes.

China’s long-anticipated digital yuan has arrived in the wallets of some ordinary citizens.

Beijing began exploring a digital currency in 2014, with the project going into high gear in 2017—the same year the country cracked down on cryptocurrency trading. The digital yuan is very much not a cryptocurrency; like the regular yuan, it is under the control of the People’s Bank of China, and will be rolled out with the help of the country’s largest commercial banks. After conducting small-scale trials earlier this year, China began its largest test yet yesterday, with 200 yuan ($30) worth of the virtual money issued to 50,000 citizens in the southern tech hub of Shenzhen through a lottery.

The pilot comes as the Chinese president Xi Jinping prepares to visit Shenzhen tomorrow (Oct. 14) to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the country’s establishment of its first special

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xCloud is an unfinished but inspiring glimpse of how we might game in the future

The first time you boot up an Xbox One game on an Android phone can be surreal. Earlier this month, I opened the Game Pass app on a Pixel 3A phone, connected an Xbox One controller via Bluetooth in the device settings, and tapped the “play” button on the page for Halo 5: Guardians. After a somewhat lengthy loading time, there I was on the menu screen, ready to play the exact same Halo 5 campaign that I left unfinished back in 2016.

It surprised me that my save file was intact and accessible in the cloud, letting me pick up right where I left off. The best part: I didn’t even have to unpack the Xbox One where I originally played the game. It’s sitting unplugged in a box, exactly where I left it since moving back to the East Coast at the end of the summer.

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Chinese App Allows Small Glimpse Beyond ‘Great Firewall’ | World News

BEIJING (Reuters) – An app launched this week in China allows access to some content on Western social media sites long banned domestically such as YouTube, marking the first product by a major Chinese tech firm that helps internet users bypass the Great Firewall.

Tuber was launched on third-party Android stores in China by a subsidiary of Qihoo 360, the biggest Chinese cybersecurity firm. The app, which has since seen millions of downloads, is not available on the Apple store just yet.

While such proxy apps are not new in China, where a virtual private network (VPN) service is typically needed to allow domestic users passage to sites such as Google or Facebook, the arrival of Tuber suggests a slight lowering of the Great Firewall.

While welcomed by internet users in China, some complained about the app’s slowness. References to sensitive political issues such as the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown

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OnePlus Gives a Glimpse to the OnePlus 8T’s Design and Camera

(Credit: OnePlus)

OnePlus is giving consumers an early look at the OnePlus 8T phone ahead of next week’s launch event. 

On Thursday, the company released a 17-second video that shows the rear side of the phone, including the camera system, which appears to have four different lenses. The company has also positioned the camera away from the center of the phone, to the top left corner, similar to the OnePlus Nord. 

We’re hoping the new camera improves what we found on the OnePlus 8; it has a three lens system, but it comes up short against other leading smartphones.

Along with the video, company CEO Pete Lau also published a forum post explaining the glossy glass covering on the 8T device, which has been redesigned to reduce fingerprints. 

“This version takes advantage of diffuse reflection, a form of light refraction that scatters light in an expansive array of angles and

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GeekWire Summit Preview: A glimpse of the future of tech, health, education, jobs and more

Our signature technology conference, the GeekWire Summit, kicks off next week. Now in its ninth year, this annual event is known for offering a glimpse of the future through the eyes of leaders in technology, science and business, and in these challenging and uncertain times, this annual tradition has never been more important.

You may have seen the news that Bill Gates has joined the lineup for an hour-long interview on Oct. 15. But the Microsoft co-founder and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation co-chair is just one element of a larger lineup. In this post and special episode of the GeekWire Podcast, my colleague John Cook and I offer a sneak preview of what’s in store.

The GeekWire Summit will be held virtually over three weeks, from Oct. 13 to 29, with sessions taking place twice weekly, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from late morning to early afternoon. The full content

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