Stacking and twisting graphene unlocks a rare form of magnetism

Stacking and twisting graphene unlocks a rare form of magnetism
Stacking monolayer and bilayer graphene sheets with a twist leads to new collective electronic states, including a rare form of magnetism. Credit: Columbia University

Since the discovery of graphene more than 15 years ago, researchers have been in a global race to unlock its unique properties. Not only is graphene—a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice—the strongest, thinnest material known to man, it is also an excellent conductor of heat and electricity.


Now, a team of researchers at Columbia University and the University of Washington has discovered that a variety of exotic electronic states, including a rare form of magnetism, can arise in a three-layer graphene structure.

The findings appear in an article published Oct. 12 in Nature Physics.

The work was inspired by recent studies of twisted monolayers or twisted bilayers of graphene, comprising either two or four total sheets. These materials were found to

Read More
Read More

New method generates precisely controlled graphene microbubbles with perfectly spherical curvature for lenses — ScienceDaily

Tiny bubbles can solve large problems. Microbubbles — around 1-50 micrometers in diameter — have widespread applications. They’re used for drug delivery, membrane cleaning, biofilm control, and water treatment. They’ve been applied as actuators in lab-on-a-chip devices for microfluidic mixing, ink-jet printing, and logic circuitry, and in photonics lithography and optical resonators. And they’ve contributed remarkably to biomedical imaging and applications like DNA trapping and manipulation.

Given the broad range of applications for microbubbles, many methods for generating them have been developed, including air stream compression to dissolve air into liquid, ultrasound to induce bubbles in water, and laser pulses to expose substrates immersed in liquids. However, these bubbles tend to be randomly dispersed in liquid and rather unstable.

According to Baohua Jia, professor and founding director of the Centre for Translational Atomaterials at Swinburne University of Technology, “For applications requiring precise bubble position and size, as well as high

Read More
Read More

Atomic Motion Of Graphene Generates Limitless Power, Study Finds

KEY POINTS

  • Study shows graphene moves in a back and forth manner similar to how electrons behave in a circuit
  • Physicists invent a circuit that can convert energy from graphene into an electrical current
  • The study result has became significant in today’s search for a clean energy source

The world may soon have a clean and limitless, energy source powered by a circuit that harvests electricity from the atomic motion of graphene. The technology comes in the form of small chips that have the potential of replacing disposable energy sources and saving people from the lifetime purchase of small batteries. 

A team of physicists from the University of Arkansas has presented their invention of a circuit that can capture the thermal motion of graphene and convert it into an electrical current. The study, published in the journal Physical Review E, is built upon a finding three years ago that first

Read More
Read More

Physicists build circuit that generates clean, limitless power from graphene

Physicists build circuit that generates clean, limitless power from graphene
Credit: University of Arkansas

A team of University of Arkansas physicists has successfully developed a circuit capable of capturing graphene’s thermal motion and converting it into an electrical current.


“An energy-harvesting circuit based on graphene could be incorporated into a chip to provide clean, limitless, low-voltage power for small devices or sensors,” said Paul Thibado, professor of physics and lead researcher in the discovery.

The findings, published in the journal Physical Review E, are proof of a theory the physicists developed at the U of A three years ago that freestanding graphene—a single layer of carbon atoms—ripples and buckles in a way that holds promise for energy harvesting.

The idea of harvesting energy from graphene is controversial because it refutes physicist Richard Feynman’s well-known assertion that the thermal motion of atoms, known as Brownian motion, cannot do work. Thibado’s team found that at room temperature the thermal motion of

Read More
Read More

‘Graphene ecosystem will help drive regional economy’

A Greater Manchester MP and science advisor has praised a new approach to innovation based around the commercialisation of graphene, citing its aim of supporting investment and new opportunities in the region.

Mark Logan, MP for Bolton North East and a member of the Parliamentary Science and Technology Committee, was shown facilities at the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC), including specialist labs and the ‘high bay’ area, which are home to highly specialised equipment used in the testing and scale-up of products using graphene and other 2D materials.

Mark (pictured right) was the first VIP visitor to take a virtual tour of a graphene facility at The University of Manchester following lockdown.

The tour was led by James Baker, CEO of Graphene@Manchester, using a digital 360 video (filmed pre-Covid) to ensure compliance with current health protocols and safeguard workers on site.

“It was really helpful to be

Read More
Read More

Royal Canadian Navy Partners with ZEN Graphene and Evercloak to Test Graphene Oxide Dehumidification Membrane Technology

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Thunder Bay, Ontario, Sep 30, 2020 (Newsfile Corp via COMTEX) —
Thunder Bay, Ontario–(Newsfile Corp. – September 30, 2020) – ZEN Graphene Solutions Ltd. (TSXV: ZEN) (“ZEN” or the “Company“) is pleased to announce that the Naval Material Technology Management (NMTM) section of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) has partnered with ZEN and Evercloak Inc. (Evercloak) as a testing organization, and has agreed to provide in-kind donations of test services from the Naval Engineering Test Establishment (NETE). The tests will compare the efficiency of an HVAC unit produced with the Evercloak dehumidification membrane technology to the incumbent HVAC system that is currently in use on the RCN’s Halifax-class frigates.

Evercloak is evaluating the advantages of its dehumidification membrane technology against the current dehumidification system used by the RCN. Based on lab testing and

Read More
Read More