Why AI Is Our Best Bet To Save Green Energy In The US

KEY POINTS

  • Global energy investment topped $2 trillion last year and the International Energy Agency estimates that China needs to add the equivalent of today’s U.S. power system to its electricity infrastructure by 2040, while India needs the equivalent of the European Union’s.
  • Average American household power interruptions totaled six hours in 2018, according to the latest U.S. Energy Information Administration statistics, up threefold from 2013 when reliability data was first collected.
  • Policymakers and business leaders will need to ensure their responses to the dawning AI revolution are smart, practical and, most importantly, ethical. 

The devastation wrought by wildfires along the U.S. west coast in recent days has exposed a fundamental flaw in the adoption of green energy: without digital innovation to create smart grids, clean energy is a green illusion.

Across the globe, hundreds of billions of dollars are being spent each year on wind and solar power projects

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Exclusive: HSBC targets net zero emissions by 2050, earmarks $1 trillion green financing

LONDON (Reuters) – HSBC HSBA.L will target net zero carbon emissions across its entire customer base by 2050 at the latest, and provide between $750 billion and $1 trillion in financing to help clients make the transition, Chief Executive Noel Quinn told Reuters.

FILE PHOTO: HSBC logo is seen on a branch bank in the financial district in New York, U.S., August 7, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid/File Photo

The pledge is the strongest statement by Europe’s biggest bank on climate change to date, although it met with criticism from some environmental groups for not taking more immediate action to curb its fossil fuel financing.

“COVID has been a wake-up call to us all, including me personally. We have seen how fragile the global economy is to a major event, in this case a health event, and it brings home the reality of what a major climate event could do,” Quinn told

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HSBC targets net zero emissions by 2050, earmarks $1 trillion green financing

By Lawrence White, Sinead Cruise and Simon Jessop

LONDON (Reuters) – HSBC <HSBA.L> will target net zero carbon emissions across its entire customer base by 2050 at the latest, and provide between $750 billion and $1 trillion in financing to help clients make the transition, its Chief Executive Noel Quinn told Reuters.

In the strongest statement by Europe’s biggest bank on climate change to date, its CEO outlined HSBC’s ambitions to align its activities with the Paris Agreement.

“COVID has been a wake-up call to us all, including me personally, we have seen how fragile the global economy is to a major event, in this case a health event, and it brings home the reality of what a major climate event could do,” Quinn told Reuters in a video interview.

HSBC aims to achieve net zero in its own operations by 2030, he added.

While other UK banks such as

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Green Builder Media Announces Call for Entries for Green Home of the Year Awards

The 13th Annual Green Home of the Year Awards and 3rd Annual Sustainability Awards celebrates sustainable cities, residential projects, and the pros who produce them. Enter today!

A winner from last year, the Monroe Farmhouse showcases outstanding attention to energy, ventilation, and heat management.
A winner from last year, the Monroe Farmhouse showcases outstanding attention to energy, ventilation, and heat management.
A winner from last year, the Monroe Farmhouse showcases outstanding attention to energy, ventilation, and heat management.
A former winner, the Palo Alto Apartments proves if one green home is good, multiple green structures must be great. This is a series of net-zero residences in the heart of downtown Palo Alto, Calif.
A former winner, the Palo Alto Apartments proves if one green home is good, multiple green structures must be great. This is a series of net-zero residences in the heart of downtown Palo Alto, Calif.
A former winner, the Palo Alto Apartments proves if one green home is good, multiple green structures must be great. This is a series of net-zero residences in the heart of downtown Palo Alto, Calif.

Lake City, Colo., Oct. 06, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Green Builder Media’s annual Green Home of the Year and

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Police ask AG to green light probe of Gila Gamliel after corona violation

The police on Tuesday requested formal approval to interrogate Environmental Protection Minister Gila Gamliel for allegedly violating multiple coronavirus-related laws.Only Attorney-General Avichai Mandelblit has the authority to allow a probe of a minister to go forward, and on Monday night a Justice Ministry spokesman said they had not yet received such a request.Although Gamliel had already admitted on Monday to violating limitations on movement during the lockdown and for a person, like her, who tested positive for the virus, the more severe allegations relate to whether she actively misled the Health Ministry in order to further violate quarantine restrictions.The difference in violations is some violations carry only a fine as a penalty whereas others could carry several years in jail for lying to the Health Ministry and active promotion of the virus.Gamliel found herself in hot water after violating coronavirus lockdown restrictions by traveling some 150 km. from her Tel
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Green Electricity Provider to Create 1,000 New Jobs in U.K.

(Bloomberg) — A U.K. clean energy company is seeking to create 1,000 jobs by the end of next year, expanding its technology to simplify the way consumers buy electricity.



a field of grass with trees in the background: Power lines run from Hinkley Point nuclear power stations, operated by Electricite de France SA's (EDF), near Bridgwater, U.K., on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016. After a decade of dealmaking and political brinkmanship, Electricite de France SA finally won the green light to build what will be the most expensive nuclear power station ever built, an 18 billion-pound ($24 billion) behemoth at Hinkley Point on England's west coast.


© Bloomberg
Power lines run from Hinkley Point nuclear power stations, operated by Electricite de France SA’s (EDF), near Bridgwater, U.K., on Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016. After a decade of dealmaking and political brinkmanship, Electricite de France SA finally won the green light to build what will be the most expensive nuclear power station ever built, an 18 billion-pound ($24 billion) behemoth at Hinkley Point on England’s west coast.

Octopus Energy Ltd. said it wants to make the U.K. the “Silicon Valley of energy” and detailed a plan to expand its cloud-computing platform, known as Kraken, which aims to make it easier and cheaper for people to use renewable energy.

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The new jobs will go mainly to graduates and

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Researchers will develop green technology to recycle refrigerants that drive climate change

LAWRENCE — Refrigerants inside the air conditioner that cools your house or apartment are extremely powerful greenhouse gases. Used widely in domestic and commercial cooling systems, commonplace refrigerants called hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) such as R-410A have a global-warming potential roughly 2,000 times greater than the carbon dioxide emitted from vehicle tailpipes.

Recent legislation restricts using some HFC refrigerants in particular applications and mandates their eventual phaseout, but with millions of tons of HFCs used today around the world, how can they be disposed of without harming the environment? Venting or incinerating them would be wasteful and could accelerate climate change.

Now, Project EARTH (Environmentally Applied Research Toward Hydrofluorocarbons), a new research project based at the University of Kansas School of Engineering, will develop technology to separate and recycle HFC refrigerant mixtures. Supported by a four-year, $2 million grant from the National Science Foundation, the Project EARTH collaboration comprises four universities —

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Going Green: The Benefits of Sustainable Infrastructure Investments and Technology’s Role

By Mohammad Raafi Hossain, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Fasset

2020 has witnessed wildfires run rampant in Australia, tremendous storms and flooding in the southern United States, and the largest ice shelf left in the world shattering earlier this month—climate change and the threat it poses to society are startlingly obvious. The impact of climate change will go well beyond the physical world, however, and is set to have significant knock-on effects to the global economy. By 2050, experts estimate, climate change will cost the world economy $7.9 trillion.

While haunted by the threat of climate change, both developed and developing nations are facing deepening challenges around infrastructure development. In emerging economies, rampant population growth and rapid urbanization are placing increased pressure on existing infrastructural systems. Meanwhile, developed markets are engaged in maintaining relevance in an increasingly technology-driven, global economy and are in need of modernizing rapidly-dating infrastructure. Around

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There’s a giant ‘Green Banana’ off Florida’s coast, and researchers have finally gotten to the bottom of it

ocean
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

If you haven’t heard of the “Green Banana blue hole” you might imagine a tropical cocktail you can order in Key West, or a dessert you ordered after a night on Bourbon Street.


Forget that. This Green Banana is actually a mysterious sink hole. More specifically, it’s a huge, underwater cavern off the coast of Florida that humans had never fully explored—until last month.

Scientists say the Green Banana could hold clues to the formation of toxic red tides, algae blooms that are devastating to Florida’s shoreline, and the extent of the aquifer that supplies the state with most of its drinking water.

Maybe even the origins of life.

Blue holes—sink holes that form under water—are not unusual in the Gulf of Mexico. In the mid-1970s, a boat captain sailing about 60 miles west of Sarasota spotted one about 160 feet under water, and an unripe

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BP Bets Future on Green Energy, but Investors Remain Wary

BP

PLC has unveiled the most aggressive plans yet by a major oil company to pivot toward cleaner energy. But the revamp has so far failed to ignite enthusiasm among investors despite growing interest in renewables.

The British energy giant’s strategy—the biggest overhaul in its 111-year history—calls for a 40% reduction in oil-and-gas production over the coming decade, greater investment in low-carbon energy and a ramp-up in wind and solar power. No other major oil company has targeted such a steep decline in their main source of profit.

“Our new strategy is going to transform BP into a very different company, not overnight…but fast,” new Chief Executive Bernard Looney told investors this month at an event detailing the plans. He acknowledged there were “a few concerns, some skepticism and even a few myths” about the overhaul.

The 50-year-old BP lifer, who took the helm in February, said the company would

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