In wake of hacker attack, patients need information | Articles

Our wired world unavoidably puts our personal information at potential risk. The points of vulnerability are many: Our home computers. Banks and credit unions. Online retailers. Government agencies.

And medical facilities. Indeed, the health care sector has been regularly a target of hackers across the country. Nebraska has had several examples. Malware, brought in by a third-party vendor’s device, struck a CHI Health location in 2019. The year before, a hacker accessed patient information at Boys Town National Research Hospital.

Last week, Nebraska Medicine became the latest health care facility targeted in our state for cyberattack. The assault — described as a “significant information technology system downtime event” — led the hospital to postpone patient appointments, with staff resorting to old-style charting of medical information.

Nebraska Medicine has since regained its footing in terms of service delivery.

“People have done a yeoman’s job in making sure we deliver good patient

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Nevada school district refuses to submit to ransomware blackmail, hacker publishes student data

A cybercriminal has published private data belonging to thousands of students following a failed attempt to exhort a ransomware payment from a Nevada school district.

Ransomware is a form of malware that can have a devastating impact on businesses and individuals alike. 

Once a ransomware package has landed and executed on a vulnerable system, files are usually encrypted, access to core systems and networks is revoked, and a landing page is thrown up demanding a payment — usually in cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin (BTC) or Monero (XMR) in return for a decryption key — which may or may not work.   

See also: Ransomware is your biggest problem on the web. This huge change could be the answer

Ransomware operators target organizations across every sector in the hopes that the fear of disrupting core operations will pressure victims into paying up. It may not be a valid legal expense, but for

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Job diary: I’m a ‘white hat’ hacker. Here’s what my job is like, and 5 things I think everyone should do to protect their personal information.

  • Frank Villani is a 53-year-old information security specialist based in New Jersey who’s worked in information technology for 24 years and IT security for 12 years.
  • He’s a ‘white hat’ hacker, someone who works on the inside of an organisation to protect its internet systems from ‘black hat’ hackers who want to violate computer security for personal gain.
  • For personal security measures, Villani says you should change your passwords every 45 days, be careful using public ATMs, pay in cash or credit cards at gas stations, and avoid using public WiFi unless it asks for credentials or consent.
  • This is his story, as told to freelance writer Jenny Powers.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

My name is Frank Villani. In a nutshell, my job is to test what those of us in the industry refer to as IOT — ‘the internet of things’ that encapsulates anything connected to

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