Huawei ousted from heart of EU as Nokia wins Belgian 5G contracts

By Supantha Mukherjee and Mathieu Rosemain

STOCKHOLM/PARIS (Reuters) – Orange and Proximus have picked Nokia to help build 5G networks in Belgium as they drop Huawei amid U.S. pressure to exclude the Chinese firm from supplying key telecoms equipment.

The moves are among the first by commercial operators in Europe to drop Huawei from next-generation networks and come after months of diplomatic pressure from Washington, which alleges Huawei equipment could be used by Beijing for spying.

The Belgian capital Brussels is home to the European Union’s executive body and parliament, making it a matter of particular concern for U.S. intelligence agencies.

“Belgium has been 100% reliant on Chinese vendors for its radio networks – and people working at NATO and the EU were making mobile phone calls on these networks,” said John Strand, an independent Danish telecoms consultant.

“The operators are sending a signal that it’s important to have access

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RIT, URMC Receive NIH Funding to Study AI-Enabled Toilet Seat Technology for Heart Failure

Toilet seats with high tech sensors might be the non-invasive technology of the future that could help reduce hospital return rates of individuals with heart disease.

Heart failure is one of the leading causes of adults admitted to hospitals and more than six million adults in the United States have heart disease, according to the American Heart Association. Re-hospitalizations occur in some instances within 30 days to 6-months of initial treatment. Having a way to intercept these rehospitalizations might afford patients improved care and decrease costs.

A joint project by researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC), will determine if in-home monitoring can successfully monitor vital signs and reduce risk and costly re-hospitalization rates for people with heart failure. The five-year, $2.9 million venture, is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Close up of FIT Seat technology embedded in a common toilet seat

Photo by: A. Sue Weisler, RIT University Communications

A close

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Yale docs ‘doing it for the heart’: Technology brings more transplants with shorter wait

NEW HAVEN — Dan Bruno’s heart was failing him.

While he taught multimedia at Groton Middle School, rode his exercise bike and lifted weights, “I learned from the doctors that this was kind of abnormal,” he said .

He had been diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a thickening of the heart muscle, at 5. He had a defibrillator. In June 2019, his weak heart caught up to him.

While mowing the lawn, Bruno’s heart began to race and his defibrillator fired, trying to shock his heart into beating regularly. Then it fired again, 21 times in all.

“They compared it to being kicked in the chest by a horse,” Bruno said. Lying face down, with “each shock, my body would convulse up. It was quite the experience.”

After showing poor results on a stress test in late July, “that basically sealed it. They said, ‘you’re going on the transplant list,’” he

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Climate change at the heart of more frequent and intense dry and hot extremes in recent decades — ScienceDaily

Simultaneous heatwaves and droughts are becoming increasingly common in western parts of the Unites States, according to a new study led by researchers from McGill University. Periods of dry and hot weather, which can make wildfires more likely, are becoming larger, more intense, and more frequent because of climate change.

In a study published by Science Advances, the researchers analyzed heat and drought events across the contiguous United States over the past 122 years. They found that combined dry and hot events have not only increased in frequency, but also in size geographically. Where such events were once confined to small parts of the United States, now they cover whole regions, such as the entire west coast and parts of the Northeast and Southeast.

“Dry-hot events can cause large fires. Add wind and a source of ignition, and this results in ‘megafires’ like the 2020 fires across the west

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U.S. sanctions on chipmaker SMIC hit at the very heart of China’s tech ambitions

  • The U.S. government has reportedly imposed restrictions that require suppliers to get an export license to sell certain equipment to China’s biggest chipmaker SMIC.
  • The move threatens to hit at the heart of China’s plans to boost its domestic semiconductor industry, a need that has been accelerated by the trade war with the U.S.
  • SMIC is seen as a critical part of China’s ambitions and the commerce department’s sanctions could hold back the company’s development for several years.



a circuit board: A close up image of a CPU socket and motherboard laying on the table.


© Provided by CNBC
A close up image of a CPU socket and motherboard laying on the table.

GUANGZHOU, China — The U.S. government has reportedly imposed restrictions on exports to SMIC, China’s biggest chip manufacturer, a move that threatens Beijing’s push to become more self-reliant in one of the most critical areas of technology.

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Suppliers for certain equipment to SMIC will need to apply for an export license, according

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In Venus’ clouds there’s phosphine. Phosphine stinks. But its discovery lifts my heart.

A computer-processed image of Venus first captured by NASA's Mariner 10 spacecraft in 1974. The contrast-enhanced version, right, makes features in the planet's thick cloud cover visible in greater detail. <span class="copyright">(NASA / JPL-Caltech)</span>
A computer-processed image of Venus first captured by NASA’s Mariner 10 spacecraft in 1974. The contrast-enhanced version, right, makes features in the planet’s thick cloud cover visible in greater detail. (NASA / JPL-Caltech)

Hazy and noxious clouds obscure the hot land below. Here in Utah, as I write, distant wildfires have turned the sky a monochromatic opal. In a time of unrest, plague and rising fear of science, joy is hard to find. Consolation, if it comes, is the sweet call of a bird, a favorite, a northern flicker above maple-red woods.

And when it’s clear, Venus, in the morning sky like a gem.

I’ve been thinking about the hazy, noxious clouds on Venus for the past few days because in its hellish sky there’s something called phosphine. Phosphine stinks. But its discovery lifted my heart.

Life is resilient. Recently, scientists revived 100-million-year-old microbes from deep ocean sediments. Another study

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Mapping the human heart, cell by cell — ScienceDaily

Ka-thump. Ka-thump. Ka-thump. Though we barely notice it most of the time, the steady beating of a human heart is an amazingly complex performance. Like an orchestra, thousands of cells have to master their individual performances as well as work together.

Now a team of scientists has created the first atlas of human heart cells, a collection of maps showing nearly half a million heart cells and identifying the role of each in the heart’s symphony. The researchers examined six regions in 14 healthy donor hearts, creating a detailed database that provides a new basis of comparison for studying heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide.

To understand what’s going wrong in various forms of heart disease, “first we need to know what is normal,” says Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator Christine Seidman, a cardiovascular geneticist at Harvard University and director of the Cardiovascular Genetics Center at Brigham and

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Royole New Foldable Smartphone FlexPai 2 is at the Heart of 2020 Flexible Technology Strategy

FREMONT, Calif., Sept. 22, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Royole Corporation, a leading innovator and pioneer of next-generation, human-machine interface technologies and products such as fully flexible displays, fully flexible sensors, foldable smartphones and other smart devices, announces the global launch of the Royole FlexPai 2 smartphone. The successor to the world’s first smartphone with a fully flexible display, Royole FlexPai, FlexPai 2 has today been announced at the 2020 Royole Strategy and New Product Launch event and introduces upgrades in performance, design and user experience.

Utilizing Royole’s most advanced, third-generation Cicada Wing® fully flexible display, FlexPai 2 brings new possibilities for the human-machine interface and delivers the brightest, most color-rich screen of any foldable smartphone and with a response speed of just 0.4ms. Royole’s fully flexible display is extremely thin and light, like wings of the cicada, and is as smooth as a mirror. The display is super

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