Lights on the track are helping runners shatter world records

Advancements in shoe technology have garnered headlines and stirred controversy recently for the way they boost performance. But three vaunted world records have fallen in recent weeks thanks in part to wavelight technology, a system of flashing lights that helps runners keep pace with record times.

There are no plans to use the lights at high-profile events such as the Olympics or world championships, where runners angle more for titles than for records. But the lights have been deployed in a handful of a single-day meets this year at which chasing world records was the primary target, generating buzz among fans, coaches and analysts.

Some appreciate the visual cues when watching on television or a computer. Others worry that the runners are benefiting from an artificial aid that wasn’t available to previous generations.

“If our activity is sport, our business is entertainment,” Sebastian Coe, president of World Athletics, the global

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App Removed After Helping Users Bypass China’s Great Firewall

(Bloomberg) — An app backed by Chinese cybersecurity giant 360 Security Technology Inc. that helped users vault over Beijing’s Great Firewall was blocked and removed from mobile stores Saturday.



a close up of a light: Green lights illuminate cable terminals on the Sberbank and SberCloud Christofari supercomputer during an event to mark its launch into commercial operation inside the Sberbank PJSC data processing center (DPC) at the Skolkovo Innovation Center in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, Dec. 16, 2019. As Sberbank expands its technology offerings, the Kremlin is backing legislation aimed at keeping the country's largest internet companies under local control by limiting foreign ownership.


© Bloomberg
Green lights illuminate cable terminals on the Sberbank and SberCloud Christofari supercomputer during an event to mark its launch into commercial operation inside the Sberbank PJSC data processing center (DPC) at the Skolkovo Innovation Center in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, Dec. 16, 2019. As Sberbank expands its technology offerings, the Kremlin is backing legislation aimed at keeping the country’s largest internet companies under local control by limiting foreign ownership.

The Tuber browser, which let mainland users visit blocked sites from Google to Facebook Inc., stopped functioning Saturday afternoon and could no longer be located on the app store run by Huawei Technologies Co. It was unclear which agency ordered its removal, which came after Chinese users on social media

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She bootstrapped her company after facing bias. Now she’s helping others do the same.

This story originally ran on CNBC.com

Melissa Bradley’s mission to help women and people of color build their businesses stems from the hardships she faced as a young entrepreneur.

The 52-year-old, co-founder of the mentorship tech platform Ureeka and a Georgetown University professor, started her first company shortly after she graduated from college 30 years ago. The business’s mission was to provide financial literacy services to parents.

Bradley says that when she went to a government agency for a loan, she was told she had three strikes against her: She was Black, she was a woman and the person said she didn’t know any successful Black women in finance.

Bradley, who recently participated in the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and CNBC + Acorns Invest in You’s “Rebuilding Better: A Virtual Town Hall for America’s Small & New Business Owners,” still managed to get her company off the ground. “I bootstrapped,”

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The Tiny Technology Helping Cannabinoid Balance By CBD Products Inc. Make A Big Splash

LA JOLLA, Calif., Oct. 9, 2020 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ — Nanotechnology has long been understood to support many facets of medical science. Researchers and manufacturers are taking this proven technology and are now applying it to one of the fastest growing consumer markets in the world – CBD. And no one has been more active in bringing this tiny technology to CBD consumers than CBD Products Inc, with their new nano inspired brand Cannabinoid Balance.

Having seen that nanotechnology could have a profound effect on absorption rates in the body, the team at CBD Products Inc. turned to NanoZorb™ to help deliver the cannabinoids and terpenes in their Cannabinoid Balance products into the bloodstream quicker.

As with so many things in science, Nano Technology works by increasing the contact area and in turn increases the rate of absorption. By using NanoZorb™Technology in their Cannabinoid Balance products, Anthony Tribunella realized that he

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OpenInvest now shows investors exactly how they’re helping the world

  • Andreessen Horowitz-backed startup OpenInvest just released Portfolio Diagnosis, a platform which allows investors to understand the social impact their investments.
  • For example, investors can learn about the amount of carbon emissions they’ve saved and how that translates to trees planted. Or, if they wish, they can ensure they are not investing in companies that support the politically divisive National Rifle Association.
  • OpenInvest was co-founded by two former Bridgewater Associates hedge funders and is backed by Andreessen Horowitz and Y Combinator.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Andreessen Horowitz-backed fintech startup OpenInvest is making it easier for investors to measure the impacts of their social or sustainable investments — down to the number of trees or carbon emissions they’ve saved.

The product, called Portfolio Diagnosis, will allow registered investment advisors — the people who help rich people manage their portfolios — more concretely describe the social impact specific investments will

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Technology is helping global communities recover during the pandemic

  • Businesses, universities, and communities around the world are innovating with digital technologies — including social media, mobile apps, analytics, and cloud computing — to cope with the pandemic. 
  • Yolande E. Chan, Arman Sadreddin, and Suchit Ahuja, researchers in business technology management, found many organizations are incorporating digital technologies into phases of their crisis management plans.
  • From identifying potential threats to containing crises, these technologies rely on community participation and infrastructure to helping global populations operate safely during this time.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Amid the horrific public health and economic fallout from a fast-moving pandemic, a more positive phenomenon is playing out: COVID-19 has provided opportunities to businesses, universities, and communities to become hothouses of innovation.

Around the world, digital technologies are driving high-impact interventions. Community and public health leaders are handling time-sensitive tasks and meeting pressing needs with technologies that are affordable and inclusive, and don’t

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A new solution to helping kids have fun with science at home

Two of our bright minds in Detroit are on a mission. Dr. Alecia Gabriel and Dierdre Roberson, two scientists who graduated from Cass Tech High School, want to enrich the lives of young teens and preteens in our community and help diversify the field of science. To do this, the duo created a fun new experience in a box called The Lab Drawer. They joined Tati Amare via to Skype talk about the box which can be delivered to your home.

The goal of The Lab Drawer is to help kids have fun learning STEAM, or science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics. The box is geared to kids aged 10-14 and according to Gabriel and Roberson, it helps kids connect the science they experience every day to scientific principles. Each box, which is delivered monthly and costs $44.99, involves a fun creative activity that kids can do. For example, the

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Precariously-balanced rocks are helping to improve earthquake hazard predictions

Precariously-balanced rocks are helping to improve earthquake hazard predictions
Precariously-balanced rocks are helping to improve earthquake hazard predictions

Precariously balanced rocks, or PBRs, can be found throughout the world, identified by slender rocks balanced on a pedestal boulder.

There are a few ways they can form. PBRs can be the result of landslides or retreating glaciers, which deposit the rocks in the unordinary formations. They can also manifest when softer blocks erode, leaving the stronger ones behind.

While they look delicate, some of them — like the Brimham Rocks in Yorkshire or Chiricahua National Monument in Arizona — have survived countless earthquakes over thousands of years. Now, researchers from Imperial College London are taking a closer look at PBRs, because they are showing promise in helping scientists determine earthquake hazards more accurately.

The study’s authors say the construction of PBRs provides insight on the upper limit of earthquake shaking that has occurred in the area.

It’s this information that

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Advisors use technology to handle challenge in helping clients adjust to the new environment

  • Financial advisory firms have had to adapt using virtual technologies to keep their meetings going with clients.
  • Their newfound comfort with tech will probably change advisory practices well into the future.
  • Top-ranked firms in the 2020 CNBC FA 100 list weigh in on how technology has transformed their businesses.



Abby Phon sitting at a desk in front of a laptop computer


© Provided by CNBC


The Covid-19 pandemic has pushed more financial advisors to figure out how to meet virtually with clients.

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Advisory firms have had to find ways to be able to adapt through the use of virtual technologies to keep their meetings going with clients. That newfound comfort will probably change advisory practices well into the future.

To that point, the first Zoom video meeting that the advisors at Salem Investment Counselors had earlier this year to discuss financial markets was not a resounding success.

“We spent half the time troubleshooting people’s connections, and then it shut down

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Semi-retired tech innovator cites helping others, developing WiFi among his accomplishments

Rob La Gesse’s resume reads like a Hollywood script.

Navy veteran. Mayor. Wi-Fi development team member. Author.

A man of many talents, La Gesse credits his accomplishments to working with great leaders and innovators of technology. That, and caring about others around him.

“My life, from being a medic to a vice president in a publicly-traded company, has been about how I can empower other people,” La Gesse, 59, said. “I call it compassionate leadership. Everything that happened to me happened because I was nice to someone.”

Rob La Gesse relaxes in the garage at home with his Cobra sports car on Oct. 2, 2020.

He grew up in Papineau, Illinois, one of six boys. At 16, his family moved to Corpus Christi. He said it was a memorable trip because they drove through traffic-jammed streets of Memphis on the day of Elvis Presley’s funeral.

College wasn’t a financial option. In 1979, after La Gesse graduated from Mary Carroll High School, he enlisted in the Navy.

La Gesse

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