Hidden camera’s hugging tiger wins wildlife photo award

The embrace by Sergey Gorshkov, Russia
Sergey Gorshkov’s winning WPY image is called The Embrace

To photograph one of rarest creatures on Earth you have to be incredibly skilled and remarkably lucky.

But Sergey Gorshkov is clearly both – as demonstrated by his stunning picture of a Siberian, or Amur, tiger deep in the forests of Russia’s Far East.

The image has just won him the title of Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

The female tiger is seen embracing a tree, rubbing herself up against the bark to leave her scent and mark territory in Leopard National Park.

“The lighting, the colours, the texture – it’s like an oil painting,” says WPY chair of judges Roz Kidman-Cox.

“It’s almost as if the tiger is part of the forest. Her tail blends with the roots of the tree. The two are one,” she told BBC News.

All the more extraordinary is that this is a camera-trap image.

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Using a UV Camera to Reveal Hidden Ultraviolet Patterns Humans Can’t See

Photographer and “mad scientist” Don Komarechka is back for a DPReview TV episode on ultraviolet light. Specifically, he explains how a modified camera-and-filter combination can reveal hidden ultraviolet patterns that are invisible to the human eye, but crucial for pollinators like bees.

Human trichromatic vision is limited to the so-called “visible” portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, but the spectrum doesn’t simply stop at those boundaries. Immediately adjacent to the visible light spectrum is near-infrared and infrared on one end, and ultraviolet on the other, both of which can be captured using specially-modified cameras.

We’ve featured infrared photography many times before, but in this video, Komarechka heads over to the other end to reveal the hidden world of ultraviolet light. Specifically, he shows you the hidden patterns that pollinators like bees use to home in on certain flowers. The results can be downright shocking:

From streaks leading to the pollen source,

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All Fortnite Season 4 Challenges: Tony Stark’s Hidden Lab, Doom’s Domain Vault, And More

Season 4 of Fortnite: Chapter 2 is rolling along across consoles and PC. This season has introduced a ton of changes to Epic’s hit battle royale shooter, bringing the likes of Thor, Iron Man, Groot, She-Hulk, Storm, and other Marvel superheroes into the game to thwart an invasion by Galactus.

Of course, a new season also means new challenges, and there are already a ton for players to complete. Clearing these tasks will level up your Season 4 battle pass, which in turn will unlock exclusive Marvel-themed cosmetics. In addition to the standard weekly missions, Epic is rolling out a separate set of Wolverine challenges over the course of the season, which you’ll need to complete to unlock the Wolverine skin. There are also Awakening challenges that will unlock emotes and other cosmetic flourishes for Season 4’s other Marvel skins.

Although Season 4 is underway on most platforms, you cannot

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Hidden Beneath the Ocean’s Surface, Nearly 16 Million Tons of Microplastic

Our plastic bags seem to end up floating like waterlogged jellyfish in the sea.

Discarded bottles spoil pristine beaches around the world.

Now, scientists have a glimpse of what happens when tiny fragments of plastic break off and end up on the ocean floor.

In what researchers called the first such global estimate, Australia’s national science agency says that 9.25 million to 15.87 million tons of microplastics — fragments measuring between five millimeters and one micrometer — are embedded on the sea floor.

That is far more than on the ocean’s surface.

It is the equivalent of 18 to 24 shopping bags full of small plastic fragments for every foot of coastline on every continent except for Antarctica.

It is an issue that activists have long warned about even as the fight to clean up the ocean has focused largely on the eradication of single-use plastic products like shopping bags.

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Cancer’s hidden vulnerabilities — ScienceDaily

One of the biggest challenges to the development of medical treatments for cancer is the fact that there is no single kind of cancer. Cancers derive from many kinds of cells and tissues, and each have their own characteristics, behaviors, and susceptibilities to anti-cancer drugs. A treatment that works on colon cancer might have little to no effect on lung cancer, for example.

So, to create effective treatments for a cancer, scientists seek insight into what make its cells tick. In a new paper appearing in Nature Communications, Caltech researchers show that a framework they developed, using a specialized type of microscopy, allows them to probe the metabolic processes inside cancer cells.

The work was conducted by researchers from the laboratory of Lu Wei, assistant professor of chemistry, as well as from the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle and UCLA. It utilizes a technique called Raman spectroscopy in conjunction

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