9 ways to expand computer science equity in high school

Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught

(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)

Almost half of U.S. high schools now teach at least one computer science course. That means, however, students at a majority of high schools don’t have access to computer science, according to a new report.

And Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught, according to “State of Computer Science Education: Illuminating Disparities” by Code.org, the Computer Science Teachers Association, and the Expanding Computing Education Pathways Alliance.

Students from rural areas and economically disadvantaged backgrounds are also less likely to have a chance to take computer science.

Students in these underrepresented groups are also less likely than are white and Asian American teeens to attend a school that offers an advanced placement computer science course or to an

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‘Very High Risk’ Two Large Pieces Of Space Junk Will Collide This Week

A defunct Russian satellite and a spent Chinese rocket just floating around high over Earth could smash into each other within a few days, potentially creating a big mess in orbit with potentially dire long-term consequences.

LeoLabs, which tracks space debris, put out the alert on Tuesday warning that the two large hunks of junk will come within 25 meters of each other and have up to a twenty percent chance of colliding Thursday evening.

That’s considered way too close for comfort by space standards. The two objects have a combined mass of 2,800 kilograms and if they were to smash into each other, the “conjunction” could create thousands of new pieces of space junk that would put actual functioning satellites at risk.

Astronomer Jonathan McDowell, who keeps a close eye on objects in orbit, identified the old crafts

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Ultrafast fiber laser produces record high power

lasertag
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

Researchers have developed an ultrafast fiber laser that delivers an average power more than ten times what is available from today’s high-power lasers. The technology is poised to improve industrial-scale materials processing and paves the way for visionary applications.


Michael Müller, a Ph.D. student of Prof. Jens Limpert from the Friedrich Schiller University’s Institute of Applied Physics and the Fraunhofer Institute of Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering in Jena, Germany, will present the new laser at the all-virtual 2020 OSA Laser Congress to be held 12-16 October. The presentation is scheduled for Tuesday, 13 October at 14:30 EDT.

High power without the heat

In lasers, waste heat is generated in the process of light emission. Laser geometries with a large surface-to-volume ratio, such as fibers, can dissipate this heat very well. Thus, an average power of about 1 kilowatt is obtained from today’s high-power

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Apple’s new iPhone 12 with 5G technology carries high expectations

The new technology, which holds the promise of internet speeds significantly faster than what is available for many smartphone users, has stoked anticipation that iPhone users will see a compelling reason to upgrade after millions in recent years held on longer to older devices.

The wave of new iPhone purchases could be enough to compare with 2014, when Apple unveiled a larger screen and sold a record number of devices, or 2017, when the company introduced higher-priced models with facial recognition leading to record revenue, analysts say.

Some investors are hoping it might even lead to the kind of dramatic growth seen in the iPhone’s earliest days, when every annual iteration promised new technological leaps and must-have features.

“I believe it translates into a once-in-a-decade-type upgrade opportunity for Apple,” said Dan Ives, an analyst for Wedbush Securities. He expects the new phone to help fuel iPhone sales this fiscal year

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Apple’s 5G iPhone Carries High Expectations

Apple


AAPL 1.74%

is set on Tuesday to unveil a 5G-enabled iPhone that has fueled sky-high expectations for the world’s most valuable company even as uncertainty remains about how useful the next-generation wireless technology is for consumers.

The new technology, which holds the promise of internet speeds significantly faster than what is available for many smartphone users, has stoked anticipation that iPhone users will see a compelling reason to upgrade after millions in recent years held on longer to older devices.

The wave of new iPhone purchases could be enough to compare with 2014, when Apple unveiled a larger screen and sold a record number of devices, or 2017, when the company introduced higher-priced models with facial recognition leading to record revenue, analysts say.

Some investors are hoping it might even lead to the kind of dramatic growth seen in the iPhone’s earliest days, when every annual iteration promised new

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It’s High Time We Got a ‘F**k Off’ Economy: Zephyr Teachout

In the 1980s, under the Reagan administration’s lax enforcement of antitrust laws, corporate mergers in the U.S. began to jump. Since then, the market power of America’s biggest corporations has only continued to increase, with this result: A tiny number of companies dominate slews of major industries—from pharmaceuticals and retailers to hospitals and meat processors to defense contractors and social media, to many, many others. This issue was thrown into stark relief during the pandemic when behemoths such as Amazon, Google, Facebook, and Walmart saw their market values skyrocket while smaller companies all over the country went bankrupt.

Zephyr Teachout contends that monopoly is the forgotten issue of our time.

Monopoly, argues the law professor and former New York congressional and gubernatorial candidate, is a key driver of modern society’s biggest problems, such as low wages, income inequality, financial speculation, restrictions to worker freedom, declining entrepreneurship, and racism.

With her

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Durr develops paint application with high edge definition and no overspray

Germany’s Durr has developed a new technique that applies paints over large areas or in simple patterns with high edge definition – and absolutely no overspray. The innovative EcoPaintJet applicator won this year’s innovation award ‘Deutscher Innovationspreis’ in Germany, and is now available for the general industry in an easily integrated set. Paint company Adler has developed paints tailored to the new application technology.

In woodworking, shipbuilding, electronics manufacturing, and many other industry sectors, product and component surfaces are coated to protect them or add colour. This previously involved a great deal of effort if the coating had to be applied with high edge definition since the surfaces either need to be manually masked or film-wrapped. There is also a significant amount of waste, both in terms of adhesive tape and paint loss due to overspray. According to Durr, with the new overspray-free application set, both of these challenges are

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Tesla Model 3 Price Too High? Dirt-Cheap Used Electric Cars Can Be Good Deals

The used EV has arrived.

It was only nine years ago that the first won’t-break-the-bank electric cars arrived.

Those non-Tesla EVs — like the Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt — weren’t priced at $80,000 like the Model S and the first- and second- generations of those cars have been hitting the used car market over the last several years.

And with a Long Range 2020 Tesla Model 3 starting at about $47,000, “dirt cheap” for an EV is anything under $20,000.

A couple of the better sites for used EVs are MYEV and CarGurus.

Most of the used EVs cited below are first- and second-generation electrics that were sold roughly between 2011 and 2017.

Note: all prices are based on a used vehicle

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Hydroxychloroquine does not counter SARS-CoV-2 in hamsters, high dose of favipiravir does: study — ScienceDaily

Virologists from the KU Leuven Rega Institute in Belgium have shown that a treatment with the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine does not limit SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus replication in hamsters. A high dose of the anti-flu drug favipiravir, by contrast, has an antiviral effect in the hamsters. The team published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Virologists at the KU Leuven Rega Institute have been working on two lines of SARS-CoV-2 research: searching for a vaccine to prevent infection, and testing existing drugs to see which one can reduce the amount of virus in infected people.

To test the efficacy of the vaccine and antivirals preclinically, the researchers use hamsters. The rodents are particularly suitable for SARS-CoV-2 research because the virus replicates itself strongly in hamsters after infection. Moreover, hamsters develop a lung pathology similar to mild COVID-19 in humans. This is not the case with

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Tech Ideas For Those Who Are Worried About High Valuations

Tech has been a terrific place to be for a while now, and still is. Traditionally, though, this area has been off-putting to those concerned about value, whether in the traditional academic sense that requires low ratios, or in the theoretically sound sense that requires investors to face the challenges of making necessary assumptions about future growth. This disconnect need not exist, however. Value investors can filter for emerging growth opportunities and look for appealing valuations within that particular subset of the market.

© Can Stock Photo / sergey150770

Value Without Growth Is Not Really Value

There are many out there who see value and growth as being opposed styles, and in some cases, downright antagonistic. That’s wrong.

The correct valuation for a stock is not an arbitrarily chosen low number, or even a low rank relative to other valuations in the market. An appealing value is one in which

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