High-speed low-power printed transistors could lead to new display technologies — ScienceDaily

The chances are you are reading these words on a smartphone or computer screen. For around the last 10 years, these types of screens have been based on a display technology composed of so-called thin film transistors. These are inorganic transistors which require very little power, and they have proven themselves very capable given their widespread adoption. But they have some limits which researchers have been busy trying to overcome.

“We explore new ways to improve upon thin film transistors, such as new designs or new methods of manufacture,” said Gyo Kitahara, a Ph.D. student from the Department of Applied Physics. “Organic thin film transistors, for example, have a bright future in LCD screen devices. Compared to the inorganic kind currently used, we expect the organic kind to be useful in low-cost, large-area, lightweight and wearable electronic products, especially by using printing-based production technologies.”

The idea of organic thin film

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High-speed photos shine a light on how metals fail

High-speed photos shine a light on how metals fail
An alloy sample being stretched in front of the laser-high speed camera set up. Credit: Aalto University

How things deform and break is important for engineers, as it helps them choose and design what materials they’re going to use for building things. Researchers at Aalto University and Tampere University have stretched metal alloy samples to their breaking point and filmed it using ultra-fast cameras to study what happens. Their discoveries have the potential to open up a whole new line of research in the study of materials deformation.


When materials get stretched a bit, they expand, and when the stretching stops, they return to their original size. However, if a material gets stretched a lot, they no longer return back to their original size. This over-stretching is referred to as ‘plastic’ deformation. Materials that have begun to be plastically deformed behave differently when they’re stretched even more, and eventually snap

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New high-speed Army satellites accelerate attacks on enemy tanks

When an Air Force fighter jet or bomber closes in on a high-value target area, poised for attack, or an Army ground unit moves to contact with an enemy, success or failure of a given high-risk mission can often hang in the balance of what can be described in two words – satellite networking.

A sufficiently hardened, multi-directional signal can ensure that pilots quickly receive target coordinates, navigational details, or sensitive threat information of great relevance to the mission. Should target accuracy be compromised, signal fidelity jammed, or flight path compromised by threats from unanticipated directions, mission objectives can of course be destroyed and lives are put at risk.

Given this, high-throughput, multi-frequency, multi-directional antennas, coupled with secure “meshed” networking between satellites, are considered crucial to war planners looking to favor success in missions by increasing the strength and speed of space connectivity.

“We are looking at how we can

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ABB Enhances Portfolio of High-Speed Industrial Robots With Codian Acquisition

Strategic buy builds on industry-leading food and beverage, pharmaceutical and logistics portfolio

ABB has acquired Codian Robotics B.V., a leading provider of delta robots, which are used primarily for high-precision pick and place applications. Codian Robotics’ offering includes a hygienic design line, ideal for hygiene-sensitive industries including food and beverage and pharmaceuticals. With the transaction, ABB is accelerating its engagement in the growing field of delta robots.

Codian Robotics is located in Ede, Netherlands and employs 20 people globally. The company will continue to serve its customers directly. The acquisition was signed and closed on October 1, 2020 and both parties agreed not to disclose any details regarding the purchase price.

“Our acquisition underscores our focus on breakthrough technology, helping our customers to fully realize the potential of automation and increase their flexibility in a rapidly changing business landscape,” said Sami Atiya, President of ABB Robotics & Discrete Automation. “Codian

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