A Brief History And The Evolution Of Partnerships

David Yovanno is the CEO of Impact, a technology company helping enterprises grow through partnerships.

The concept of partnerships has been around for some time. It extends from the recent definition of traditional affiliates and social media influencers, and even further back from the Industrial Revolution and big business in the 1800s. The original partnerships — two people or groups working together for mutual benefit — have probably been around since the dawn of civilization. We have long known the inherent benefit of working together. 

But today’s modern partnerships offer unique opportunities for business growth that didn’t exist even 20 years ago. So where did modern partnerships come from, where are we today and what’s next? Let’s explore.

The Inception: Affiliates 

Picture this: It is the late 20th century, the World Wide Web has emerged as a staple in the everyday consumer’s lifestyle. With this new platform, all

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Missouri University Of Science And Technology Receives $300 Million Gift, The Largest In Missouri Higher Education History

Missouri University of Science and Technology(Missouri S and T) announced today that it had received a $300 million donation, the largest single gift in the history of Missouri higher education. St. Louis businessman and Missouri S and T alum Fred Kummer and his wife June are giving the money to a foundation they created that will support several initiatives at the university.

The Kummers’ gift will be administered by The Kummer Institute Foundation. Funds from the foundation will support several new initiatives at Missouri S&T, including:

  • A new research and development entity modeled after other university-affiliated centers like the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California and the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. The new organization will be the home to four new research
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The GOP has a long history of ignoring science. Trump turned it into policy.

The resulting litany of falsehoods, misdirection and anti-science policies — during the pandemic, for instance, Trump has claimed that the coronavirus would just “disappear,” insisted that it doesn’t harm children, said covid-19 “affects virtually nobody” (1 million deaths worldwide), endorsed sham treatments such as injecting bleach and dismissed the ability of masks to stop the virus’s spread — looks like a product of a singular, addled mind. “I have no explanation for why these briefings and the scientific evidence just doesn’t seem to click” with him, former White House coronavirus task force staffer Olivia Troye, who resigned in protest of Trump’s science denialism, recently said. The wealthiest country in history, armed with arguably the best hospitals and smartest doctors anywhere, has registered the most cases, the most deaths and perhaps the most hostile-to-science response of any nation in the world. Experts say tens of thousands of the 212,000 American

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How an Expedition to the Galapagos Islands Saved One of the World’s Largest Natural History Museums | Science

In the spring of 1905, eight researchers from the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco set sail on a mission to complete a major comprehensive survey of the Galapagos Islands, something that no other institution had yet to accomplish. For 17 months, well-trained specialists in the fields of botany, geology, paleontology, entomology, malacology (the study of mollusks), ornithology and herpetology went on a collecting spree. They gathered multiple specimens of plants, birds, mammals, insects and reptiles. While they suspected that the collected specimens would help solidify Darwin’s theory of evolution and inform the world about Galapagos wildlife, they couldn’t have imagined that when they returned home, their city would be recovering from a catastrophic earthquake and conflagration that nearly destroyed their own institution.

“The Galapagos expedition was kind of a way to prove themselves. In the vein of, ‘We’re this scrappy little West Coast institution and we want to

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Common Sense Launches ‘Which Side of History?’ Campaign to Challenge Leaders to Reverse the Harm Tech Is Having on Democracy and Our Lives

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today Common Sense, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families in the digital world, launched Which Side of History?, a campaign to hold Big Tech accountable for sowing mistrust and spreading misinformation, threatening free and open societies, exacerbating the gap between rich and poor, creating an unequal society, and leaving an entire segment of the population behind.

Anchored by Common Sense founder and CEO James P. Steyer’s newest book, Which Side of History?: How Technology Is Reshaping Democracy and Our Lives (available October 13, 2020), the campaign convenes leading experts and Big Tech antagonists, such as Franklin Foer,Thomas Friedman, Shaun Harper, Julie Lythcott-Haims,Roger McNamee,Shoshana Zuboff, and others for a series of live virtual events to examine the impact of the tech sector on

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Save up to 55% on the world’s leading science, tech and history magazines

The holidays are the perfect time to stock up on quality reading material for the winter, but why not ensure your shelves are full for the whole year ahead? There is no better way than with a subscription to the world’s leading science, tech and history magazines. With annual and quarterly offers available in print and digital, you can bag the perfect holiday gift early and save money while you’re at it.  



graphical user interface, website: All about History, How it Works, History of War and All About Space magazines


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With a quarterly digital subscription, you will save 45% on the cover price — that’s just $7.15 for three issues — while our annual offers will make your gift last all year! If you love getting hold of a print copy, you can also get each issue delivered to your door, as well as your device, with our print

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California’s August Complex largest fire in state’s history — ScienceDaily

NOAA/NASA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured another startling image of the August Complex of fires that has grown to over 1,000,000 acres burned (1,006,140 acres total) and because of that grim milestone the complex has been dubbed a “gigafire.” The August Complex is only 58% contained. Inciweb reports that: “In the northeast zone, active behavior continues. Structures in Hidden Valley, Trinity Pines/Post Mountain, Wildwood and Platina are threatened by fire spread. Short range spotting and fire spread toward Hidden Valley has increased potential for impact to structures.”

Another view that can be captured by Suomi NPP satellite is a false-color image. The false-color image is collected by the VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) instrument suite using corrected reflectance bands. Burned areas or fire-affected areas are characterized by deposits of charcoal and ash, removal of vegetation and/or the alteration of vegetation structure. When bare soil becomes exposed, the brightness in Band

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History suggests tech shares poised for new highs in 2021

Column chart of Per cent showing Global tech stocks made big gains following mid-cycle corrections

The Nasdaq 100 index of the world’s largest technology companies suffered a tough run in September, shedding 5.7 per cent in its biggest pullback since the coronavirus shock in March. But if the trading patterns of the past five years hold, it may not be long before the sector rebounds.

The latest decline came as a frenzied tech rally ran out of momentum, continuing a highly volatile year. Even after the drop in September, and a 7.7 per cent decline in March, the index is still up about 30 per cent in 2020.

Analysis from UBS shows that between 2015 and 2019, mid-cycle corrections in global tech stocks lasted an average of a month from peak to trough, and caused the sector to lose 11 per cent. The scale of the rebounds over the following six months was, on average, 20 per cent.

This year has been supersized. In 38

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U.S. commercial aircraft Resilience makes history with Halloween launch

The first commercially owned U.S. rocket is going to launch into space this Halloween, by way of NASA and Space X.

NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 flight mission, scheduled to launch on October 31, will carry NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover, and Shannon Walker, as well as Soichi Noguchi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, to the space station from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, according to a press release.

MORE ASTRONOMY, PLEASE: SpaceX plans to build luxury spaceport resort in a tiny Texas town

The group will be the first international team to fly a NASA-certified capsule owned and operated by an American company. It will also be the first time an international crew member has flown on a commercial spacecraft from U.S. soil. It will be SpaceX’s second launch.

Michael Hopkins, commander of the Crew Dragon Spacecraft, was excited about the launch in a press conference held yesterday,

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Windows XP source code leak sheds light on Microsoft’s OS history

We’ve asked Microsoft for comment, although it already said it was “investigating the matter.” The Verge claimed the code was legitimate, with Ronin Dey and others also supporting those beliefs (via Windows Central).

One version of the code leak also includes code for MS DOS, Windows CE, Windows Embedded and Windows NT, although those aren’t believed to be new leaks. Experts talking to ZDNet believed the new leaks came from academia, which has long had access to Windows source code to help bolster its security.

This won’t necessarily lead to security issues on par with the WannaCry ransomware attack. While WannaCry exploited Windows XP flaws, the campaign succeeded in part due to poor security policies. No amount of source code will change that, especially if it doesn’t include later XP releases. Microsoft also ended regular support for Windows XP in 2014, limiting any help to organizations with special contracts.

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