From edible treats to science experiments, these are the hottest toys of 2020

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The holiday season is fast-approaching, and this year we might be looking forward to days filled with joy and gift-giving more than ever.

Little kids can often be some of the hardest people on your list to shop for — there is always a new toy or gadget that you likely haven’t heard of yet, and it might already be off the shelves by the time they actually tell you what they really want. Even if the little ones in your life haven’t started curating their wish list just yet, we’ve got the inside scoop on all of the hottest toys of the season.

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How Dan Sundheim became the LeBron James of investing, launched one of the hottest hedge funds on earth, and minted a billion-dollar fortune along the way

The world has changed drastically in the two years since D1 Capital launched.



Ole Andreas Halvorsen posing for the camera: Dan Sundheim has quickly become an investor to follow since launching his fund D1 Capital after working as the chief investment officer at Andreas Halvorsen's Viking Global. Alastair Grant/AP Photo; Streeter Lecka/Getty Images; Brendan McDermid/Reuters; Scott Olson/Getty Images; Samantha Lee/Business Insider


© Provided by Business Insider
Dan Sundheim has quickly become an investor to follow since launching his fund D1 Capital after working as the chief investment officer at Andreas Halvorsen’s Viking Global. Alastair Grant/AP Photo; Streeter Lecka/Getty Images; Brendan McDermid/Reuters; Scott Olson/Getty Images; Samantha Lee/Business Insider

And Dan Sundheim made money through it all, thanks to a string of bets that have emerged as winners in the new normal. The Wharton grad now has at least $1 billion in personal wealth between his assets in his firm, stake in the NBA’s Charlotte Hornets, real-estate portfolio, and art collection.

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The former Viking Global Investors chief investment officer started trading at D1 in July 2018 with more than $5 billion — including more than $500 million of his own money — and hasn’t looked back.

Business Insider’s

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Fungus May Be Fall’s Hottest Fashion Trend

It may be fashion week in Paris, with showgoers in face coverings parsing runway looks from the latest designer ready-to-wear collections, but several thousand miles away from the French capital, out of the dank, dark belly of an industrial hangar, a potentially more momentous industry trend is … growing.

Mushroom leather might not sound stylish. But Bolt Threads, a start-up that specializes in developing next-generation fibers inspired by nature, is one of a growing number of companies convinced that the material is a viable replacement — in both form and function — for animal-sourced and synthetic skins.

In 2018, Bolt Threads began producing limited-edition products made from Mylo, a material made from mycelium, the branching network of threadlike cells that underpins all fungi. Now they are preparing to bring that technology to the world, thanks to an unconventional consortium of backers (and rivals) from across the fashion spectrum.

This week,

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Nuclear Power Wants to Hitch Fortune to the Hottest New Fuel

(Bloomberg) —

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The nuclear industry should tap into rising investor interest in hydrogen-fuel to revive the flagging prospects of reactor operators in an increasingly crowded marketplace for clean power.

That was the message delivered by executives and scientists who convened this week at the International Atomic Energy Agency. Higher demand for hydrogen from industry and heavy transport could make production of the fuel by operating reactors more economical, potentially breathing new life into a technology that’s been overtaken by wind and solar power.

“If nuclear can be leveraged to generate alternative revenue streams, its costs can be offset,” said Gloria Kwong, the Nuclear Energy Agency’s head of technology, at the IAEA’s annual general conference this week in Vienna. Executives from the Korean Atomic Energy Institute and Canadian Nuclear Laboratories similarly recommended a pivot toward hydrogen to buoy the industry’s prospects.



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© WNISR via Bloomberg



Trailing Atomic Investments

Nuclear

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Nuclear Power Wants to Hitch Its Fortune to the Hottest New Fuel

(Bloomberg) —

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The nuclear industry should tap into rising investor interest in hydrogen-fuel to revive the flagging prospects of reactor operators in an increasingly crowded marketplace for clean power.

That was the message delivered by executives and scientists who convened this week at the International Atomic Energy Agency. Higher demand for hydrogen from industry and heavy transport could make production of the fuel by operating reactors more economical, potentially breathing new life into a technology that’s been overtaken by wind and solar power.

“If nuclear can be leveraged to generate alternative revenue streams, its costs can be offset,” said Gloria Kwong, the Nuclear Energy Agency’s head of technology, at the IAEA’s annual general conference this week in Vienna. Executives from the Korean Atomic Energy Institute and Canadian Nuclear Laboratories similarly recommended a pivot toward hydrogen to buoy the industry’s prospects.



chart, bar chart


© WNISR via Bloomberg



Trailing Atomic Investments

Nuclear

Read More
Read More