New 3-D model of a DNA-regulating complex in human cells provides cancer clues — ScienceDaily

Scientists have created an unprecedented 3-dimensional structural model of a key molecular “machine” known as the BAF complex, which modifies DNA architecture and is frequently mutated in cancer and some other diseases. The researchers, led by Cigall Kadoch, PhD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, have reported the first 3-D structural “picture” of BAF complexes purified directly from human cells in their native states — rather than artificially synthesized in the laboratory -providing an opportunity to spatially map thousands of cancer-associated mutations to specific locations within the complex.

“A 3-D structural model, or ‘picture,’ of how this complex actually looks inside the nucleus of our cells has remained elusive — until now,” says Kadoch. The newly obtained model represents “the most complete picture of the human BAF complex achieved to date,” said the investigators, reporting in the journal Cell.

These new findings “provide a critical foundation for understanding human disease-associated mutations

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UserTesting Announces Second Annual Illumi Award Winners at the Human Insight World Customer Conference

The illumi Awards recognizes brands who have achieved extraordinary success using human insights to deliver world-class customer experiences

UserTesting, a leading provider of on-demand human insights, today announced the winners of its second annual illumi Awards at Human Insight World (#HiWorld20). The UserTestingⓇ HiWorld™ customer conference brings together UX researchers, designers, marketers, and product managers from some of the world’s leading brands to learn, share, and discuss how to create great experiences, build innovative products, and launch impactful campaigns using real human insight to drive the decision-making process.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005871/en/

UserTesting illumi Awards 2020 (Graphic: Business Wire)

“Great customer experiences start with human insight. Organizations that focus on customer empathy, particularly in today’s business climate, will continue to build brand loyalty, and long term success, said Andy MacMillan, CEO of UserTesting. “The illumi Awards highlight the incredible work our customers are

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How deadly parasites ‘glide’ into human cells — ScienceDaily

In biological terms, gliding refers to the type of movement during which a cell moves along a surface without changing its shape. This form of movement is unique to parasites from the phylum Apicomplexa, such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Both parasites, which are transmitted by mosquitoes and cats, have an enormous impact on global heath. Plasmodium causes 228 million malaria infections and around 400,000 deaths per year. Toxoplasma, which infects even one third of the human population, can cause severe symptoms in some people, and is particularly dangerous during pregnancy.

Gliding enables the Apicomplexa parasites to enter and move between host cells. For example, upon entering the human body through a mosquito bite, Plasmodium glides through human skin before crossing into human blood vessels. This type of motion relies on actin and myosin, which are the same proteins that enable muscle movement in humans and other vertebrates. Myosin has a

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Capgemini Press Release// Capgemini reveals its purpose of “Unleashing human energy through technology for an inclusive and sustainable future.”

Hi,
Please find below the press release issued today.

Best regards,

Florence Lièvre
Global PR Manager | Group Marketing & Communications

Capgemini Group | Paris
Tel.: +33 1 47 54 50 71
Email : florence.lievre@capgemini.com
_____________________

Press contact:
Sam Connatty
Tel.: +44 (0) 370 904 3601
Email: sam.connatty@capgemini.com

Capgemini reveals its purpose of
“Unleashing human energy through technology
for an inclusive and sustainable future.”

Paris, October 12 2020 – Capgemini today reveals its purpose which was developed in collaboration with its many stakeholders, and with the Group’s employees at the heart of the process. It now forms one of the fundamentals of the Group.

 “Unleashing human energy through technology for an inclusive and sustainable future”: for the Capgemini Group, technology promises progress

The Group believes that digital transformation should benefit all of humanity. Capgemini intends to be a benchmark in terms of its contribution to society, not just for

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When human and machine agree about iridium oxide

atoms
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A human research team and a machine learning algorithm have found that we need to rethink much of what we know about iridium oxide.


Iridium oxide is an excellent catalyst for electrochemical reactions, and is typically used for the production of energy carriers such as hydrogen from water. Now it turns out that research on iridium oxide carried out so far has been based on a wrong basic assumption: The arrangement of the atoms on its surface is completely different to that previously assumed.

The way in which this surprising result was determined gives a tantalizing first glimpse of how research might be performed in the future: a collaborative effort between a human research team and artificial intelligence analyzed the same problem, and came to the same conclusion. Since the researchers at the TU Wien and the TU Munich reached the same result at the same

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How many organs are in the human body?

Since ancient times, humankind has sought to understand the guts inside us. Ancient Egyptians handled human organs as they removed them for embalming. Medical manuscripts found in an ancient Chinese tomb may be the earliest-known anatomical writing about the human body. Thousands of years later, do we know how many organs are in the human body?

Organs are collections of tissues that work together for a common goal, explained Lisa M.J. Lee, an associate professor in the Department of Cell & Developmental Biology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “Every organ provides a function for human performance or survival,” she told Live Science.

But not every organ is necessary for survival. Only five organs — the brain, heart, liver, at least one kidney, and at least one lung are absolutely essential for living. Losing total function of any one of these vital organs spells death. Remarkably,

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Will This Be the Last French Open With Only Human Eyes Minding the Lines?

“It is not a 3-D re-creation; we give the real image,” Simon said. “We see the surface of the court how it is, even if it has moved or just moved.”

This year, the U.S. Open became the first Grand Slam event to use almost exclusively electronic line calling, eliminating line umpires on all but two of its courts. Initial feedback was positive, according to Stacey Allaster, the tournament director, but the U.S. Open has yet to commit to using the same system in 2021.

Electronic line judging would most likely eliminate one current issue: umpires examining the wrong ball mark on the clay, which is a frequent source of tension with players. But if there is a switch to electronic calls, players will still be able to see the mark on clay, and it will not always match what technology records.

“The ball mark can be larger or smaller

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Cheaper refrigerators? Stronger hip implants? A better understanding of human disease? All of these could be possible — ScienceDaily

Cheaper refrigerators? Stronger hip implants? A better understanding of human disease? All of these could be possible and more, someday, thanks to an ambitious new project underway at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

NIST researchers are in the early stages of a massive undertaking to design and build a fleet of tiny ultra-sensitive thermometers. If they succeed, their system will be the first to make real-time measurements of temperature on the microscopic scale in an opaque 3D volume — which could include medical implants, refrigerators, and even the human body.

The project is called Thermal Magnetic Imaging and Control (Thermal MagIC), and the researchers say it could revolutionize temperature measurements in many fields: biology, medicine, chemical synthesis, refrigeration, the automotive industry, plastic production — “pretty much anywhere temperature plays a critical role,” said NIST physicist Cindi Dennis. “And that’s everywhere.”

The NIST team has now finished building

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Argentina is using facial recognition system that tracks child suspects, Human Rights Watch says

Publishing such information violates the Convention of the Rights of the Child, a U.N. agreement to which Argentina is a signatory, that says a child’s privacy should be respected at all stages of legal proceedings, said Hye Jung Han, a researcher and advocate in the children’s rights division at Human Rights Watch, who was the lead researcher on the report.

Argentina’s embassy in Washington did not respond immediately to a request for comment.

On a visit to Argentina in May 2019, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy warned the Argentine government that CONARC’s database contained 61 children. By that October Argentina’s justice ministry said there was no children’s data in CONARC. But the report contends the practice continued after the U.N. visit, with 25 additional children added to the database.

An HRW review of CONARC also saw that the public information about the children was peppered

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PFAS ‘forever chemicals’ are widespread and threaten human health

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.)

(THE CONVERSATION) Like many inventions, the discovery of Teflon happened by accident. In 1938, chemists from Dupont (now Chemours) were studying refrigerant gases when, much to their surprise, one concoction solidified. Upon investigation, they found it was not only the slipperiest substance they’d ever seen – it was also noncorrosive and extremely stable and had a high melting point.

In 1954 the revolutionary “nonstick” Teflon pan was introduced. Since then, an entire class of human-made chemicals has evolved: per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, better known as PFAS. There are upward of 6,000 of these chemicals. Many are used for stain-, grease- and waterproofing. PFAS are found in clothing, plastic, food packaging, electronics, personal care products, firefighting foams, medical devices and numerous other products.

But over time, evidence has slowly built that some commonly used PFAS

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