‘Lack of updated information hurts stock investors’

The BSEC was also considering redefining the definition of Price Sensitive Information (PSI) to ensure its due objective

The demise of 62 directors from 32 listed companies were not updated in their respective websites, which prevented investors from getting updated information, said Commissioner of the Bangladesh Securities and Exchange Commission (BSEC), Prof Shaikh Shamsuddin Ahmed, on Saturday.

He also said that about 15% of listed companies’ websites were non-functional, despite it being mandatory by law to keep their information updated at all times. Additionally, 7% of the listed companies did not have any annual report on their websites.

The BSEC commissioner made the remarks at a webinar titled “Technology to Protect and Assist Investors in the Capital Market”, organized on World Investors Week 2020, by Bangladesh Merchant Bankers Association (BMBA) on the day.

He also informed that BSEC was set to allow stockbrokers to open trading booths across the country

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The government’s low-tech reputation hurts future innovators

The U.S. government has an image problem.

The idea that the government is a low-tech place where projects move slowly has chilled the willingness of lawmakers to fund ambitious, tech-driven projects within the government. And it’s stifled the movement of talented people into government service roles.

In a conversation at Fast Company‘s Innovation Festival Thursday, ex-Google CEO Eric Schmidt, Rhode Island governor Gina Raimondo, and Booz Allen Hamilton chief innovation officer Susan Penfield argued that the government needs to embark on a charm offensive to prove that big-time, game-changing innovation isn’t strictly confined to the private sector.

According to Penfield of Booz Allen Hamilton, the government doesn’t entirely deserve its low-tech reputation.

“There’s amazing work going on every day, and it really takes leadership . . . from the federal sector to really tout the things they’re doing,” Booz Allens’s Penfield said. “If you think about the government, they’re

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Vedanta’s Profit Tumbles as India Lockdown Hurts Output, Demand

(Bloomberg) — Billionaire Anil Agarwal’s Indian commodities conglomerate Vedanta Ltd. posted a 23.5% drop in quarterly profit as one of the world’s strictest lockdowns hit production and demand.



a man walking down a street next to a river: Police officers walk along an empty road during a lockdown imposed due to the coronavirus in Mumbai, India, on Monday, June 1, 2020. Despite a strict two-month-long lockdown, the outbreak in India’s financial capital has snowballed, with the city now accounting for nearly a quarter of India’s more than 4,700 deaths and more a fifth of India’s over 165,000 infections.


© Bloomberg
Police officers walk along an empty road during a lockdown imposed due to the coronavirus in Mumbai, India, on Monday, June 1, 2020. Despite a strict two-month-long lockdown, the outbreak in India’s financial capital has snowballed, with the city now accounting for nearly a quarter of India’s more than 4,700 deaths and more a fifth of India’s over 165,000 infections.

Group net income slumped to 10.33 billion rupees ($141 million) in the three months to June from 13.51 billion rupees a year earlier, the company said in a statement late Saturday. Sales fell 25.9% to 156.87 billion rupees.

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Vedanta’s main businesses include zinc, aluminum and oil and gas, all of which have been hit by a

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