The GOP has a long history of ignoring science. Trump turned it into policy.

The resulting litany of falsehoods, misdirection and anti-science policies — during the pandemic, for instance, Trump has claimed that the coronavirus would just “disappear,” insisted that it doesn’t harm children, said covid-19 “affects virtually nobody” (1 million deaths worldwide), endorsed sham treatments such as injecting bleach and dismissed the ability of masks to stop the virus’s spread — looks like a product of a singular, addled mind. “I have no explanation for why these briefings and the scientific evidence just doesn’t seem to click” with him, former White House coronavirus task force staffer Olivia Troye, who resigned in protest of Trump’s science denialism, recently said. The wealthiest country in history, armed with arguably the best hospitals and smartest doctors anywhere, has registered the most cases, the most deaths and perhaps the most hostile-to-science response of any nation in the world. Experts say tens of thousands of the 212,000 American

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Tech giants are ignoring questions over the legality of their EU-US data transfers

A survey of responses from more than 30 companies to questions about how they’re approaching EU-US data transfers in the wake of a landmark ruling (aka Schrems II) by Europe’s top court in July, which struck down the flagship Privacy Shield over US surveillance overreach, suggests most are doing the equivalent of burying their head in the sand and hoping the legal nightmare goes away.

European privacy rights group, noyb, has done most of the groundwork here — rounding up in this 45-page report responses (some in English, others in German) from EU entities of 33 companies to a set of questions about personal data transfers.

It sums up the answers to the questions about companies’ legal basis for transferring EU citizens’ data over the pond post-Schrems II as “astonishing” or AWOL — given some failed to send a response at all.

Tech companies polled on the issue run the

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Ignoring isolation request from NHS app is not illegal

Matt Hancock said today on Times Radio it wouldn't be illegal to ignore a message from the coronavirus app telling you to go into self-isolation. (PA)
Matt Hancock said today on Times Radio it wouldn’t be illegal to ignore a message from the coronavirus app telling you to go into self-isolation. (PA)

It will not be illegal to ignore the NHS app telling you to self-isolate, Matt Hancock confirmed today.

Speaking on Times Radio the health secretary said it was not mandatory to enter self-isolation if the app told you to, but it is if an NHS test and trace member of staff tells you to.

On Monday it will be illegal in England to not enter self-isolation after being told to do so by a staff member of NHS test and trace, with the threat of a £10,000 fine.

Hancock said: “If the app tells you to self isolate then you should self isolate, if an NHS test and trace contact tracer tells you to then you must by law.”

Watch: How does the Covid-19

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