Get Real Launches New Advisory Firm To Help Clients Imagine And Leverage Virtual Reality And Augmented Reality Technology To Improve The Way They Work

CHICAGO, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Get Real, a Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality (VR/AR) advisory firm, publicly launched today to help businesses and not for profits implement VR and AR technologies that dramatically improve and scale their organizations. Clients will benefit from Get Real’s team of professionals that combine several decades of experience in leveraging emerging technology and integrated platforms to solve real-world business challenges and create sustainable competitive advantages.

“We’re excited to help our clients discover Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in its early stages, establish themselves as leaders amongst their peers, and maintain a competitive edge for years to come,” said Rob Merrilees, Get Real Co-Founder. “Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality technology is ready for business applications today. It has the ability to change how organizations train, collaborate, market, visualize data, gather, educate, and raise money.”

Get Real works with clients to match them with

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Rajasthan Royals Implement RightEye’s Advanced Dynamic Vision Technology to Improve Players’ Performance

Dynamic vision testing and training system aims to provide elite cricketers with competitive edge.

The Rajasthan Royals (RR), an Indian Premier League foundational cricket team, has adopted RightEye’s Dynamic Vision testing technology and Dynamic Vision Trainer to improve its players’ sports vision and gain a competitive edge that will differentiate the team from the rest of the pack.

Elite sports teams require their athletes to perform at the peak of their potential. Exceptional dynamic vision is critical for cricket players to excel in a sport that requires superior ball tracking, visual speed, and visual processing skills. The ability to see an object in space and understand how fast and where it is traveling is paramount for athletes’ success.

As the Royals prepare for the upcoming IPL season in Dubai, most players on the team have already been tested. “The fast-paced sport of cricket demands that our players have outstanding dynamic

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Microsoft and Facebook vet leads nonprofit making software to improve COVID-19 rapid tests

Most of the Audere team, gathered together in pre-COVID times. (Audere Photo)

A Seattle-based nonprofit launched to provide digital health solutions for poorer countries is applying its expertise to help with COVID-19 testing.

Audere is building software for administering rapid result COVID tests that can be integrated into products being developed by U.S. manufacturers that use saliva or nasal swab samples.

“There is a critical need for rapid testing,” said Philip Su, CEO and founder of Audere. People are increasingly realizing that the widespread distribution of a vaccine is still many months away. The availability of accurate, inexpensive tests that provide results in minutes can help control the spread of the virus in the meantime, Su said.

Philip Su, Audere CEO and founder. (Audere Photo)

The tests — known generally as rapid diagnostic tests or RDTs — can have high rates of failure, though the basic concept is simple. Imagine

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Silk fibers improve bioink for 3D-printed artificial tissues and organs — ScienceDaily

How do you test, in early-stage research, whether a potential pharmaceutical effectively targets a human tumor, organ, or some other part of the body? How do you grow a new hand or some other body part? Researchers are in the early stages of using 3D cell printing technology to make developments like these happen. A standard way — currently unavailable — to fix the cells in place after printing would help researchers avoid having to ‘reinvent the wheel’ in every new investigation.

In a study recently published in Materials Today Bio, researchers from Osaka University have used silk nanofibers obtained by mechanical disintegration to enhance the printing process without damaging the cells or cell assemblies. An attractive point of silk for this application is that silk is believed to be a safe material for humans. This development will help bring 3D cell printing research out of the laboratory and

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Questionmark Launches Ready-Made Assessments to Help Employers Identify Staff Strengths and Weakness and Improve Performance

  • Tests cover compliance, sales & marketing, and transferable skills

  • Better skills assessments help employers make more informed people decisions

Questionmark, the online assessment provider, has launched a new ready-made assessment offer that helps employers assess the business skills of their people. The tests cover compliance, sales and marketing, and transferable skills.

Questionmark has developed the tests in response to demand from customers who wanted help to identify strengths and address areas of risk or weakness across specific skills and functions.

The launch is part of the firm’s strategy to provide an end-to-end assessment service for customers. It complements Questionmark’s enterprise-grade assessment platform. It follows the launch of Questionmark’s professional services, where the firm provides a range of consultancy and training services to help customers get up to speed on the platform.

Assessments available through the new offer will include:

Compliance tests

Employers often struggle to identify what regulations and compliance

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Precariously-balanced rocks are helping to improve earthquake hazard predictions

Precariously-balanced rocks are helping to improve earthquake hazard predictions
Precariously-balanced rocks are helping to improve earthquake hazard predictions

Precariously balanced rocks, or PBRs, can be found throughout the world, identified by slender rocks balanced on a pedestal boulder.

There are a few ways they can form. PBRs can be the result of landslides or retreating glaciers, which deposit the rocks in the unordinary formations. They can also manifest when softer blocks erode, leaving the stronger ones behind.

While they look delicate, some of them — like the Brimham Rocks in Yorkshire or Chiricahua National Monument in Arizona — have survived countless earthquakes over thousands of years. Now, researchers from Imperial College London are taking a closer look at PBRs, because they are showing promise in helping scientists determine earthquake hazards more accurately.

The study’s authors say the construction of PBRs provides insight on the upper limit of earthquake shaking that has occurred in the area.

It’s this information that

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Study suggests EMFs alter redox signaling to improve insulin sensitivity — ScienceDaily

Researchers from the University of Iowa may have discovered a safe new way to manage blood sugar non-invasively. Exposing diabetic mice to a combination of static electric and magnetic fields for a few hours per day normalizes two major hallmarks of type 2 diabetes, according to new findings published Oct. 6 in Cell Metabolism.

“We’ve built a remote control to manage diabetes,” says Calvin Carter, PhD, one of the study’s lead authors and a postdoc in the lab of senior author Val Sheffield, MD, PhD, professor of pediatrics, and of ophthalmology and visual sciences at the UI Carver College of Medicine. “Exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) for relatively short periods reduces blood sugar and normalizes the body’s response to insulin. The effects are long-lasting, opening the possibility of an EMF therapy that can be applied during sleep to manage diabetes all day.”

The unexpected and surprising discovery may have

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Scientist maps CO2 emissions for entire US to improve environmental policymaking — ScienceDaily

With intense wildfires in the western U.S. and frequent, intense hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, the nation is again affected by extreme weather-related events resulting from climate change. In response, cities, states and regions across the country are developing policies to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases, chiefly carbon dioxide (CO2). Even though many state and local governments are committed to these goals, however, the emissions data they have to work with is often too general and too expensive to provide a useful baseline and target the most effective policy.

Professor Kevin Gurney of Northern Arizona University’s School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems today published results in the Journal of Geophysical Research detailing greenhouse gas emissions across the entire U.S. landscape at high space- and time-resolution with details on economic sector, fuel and combustion process.

Gurney, who specializes in atmospheric science, ecology and public policy, has

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Innovation could improve detection of COVID-19 infections

COVID-19
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

A multidisciplinary research team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a way to increase the sensitivity of the primary test used to detect the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19. Applying their findings to computerized test equipment could improve our ability to identify people who are infected but do not exhibit symptoms.


The team’s results, published in the scientific journal Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, describe a mathematical technique for perceiving comparatively faint signals in diagnostic test data that indicate the presence of the virus. These signals can escape detection when the number of viral particles found in a patient’s nasal swab test sample is low. The team’s method helps a modest signal stand out more clearly.

“Applying our technique could make the swab test up to 10 times more sensitive,” said Paul Patrone, a NIST physicist and a co-author on the

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Surgeons find that shifting to virtual visits could be a way to improve patient-centered care, satisfy busy patients — ScienceDaily

Surgical patients who participate in virtual follow-up visits after their operations spend a similar amount of time with surgical team members as those who meet face-to-face. Moreover, these patients benefit by spending less time waiting at and traveling to the clinic for in-person appointments, according to research findings presented at the virtual American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress 2020.

“I think it’s really valuable for patients to understand that, in the virtual space scenario, they are still going to get quality time with their surgical team,” said lead study author Caroline Reinke, MD, FACS, associate professor of surgery at Atrium Health in Charlotte, N.C. “A virtual appointment does not shorten that time, and there is still an ability to answer questions, connect, and address ongoing medical care.”

Due to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the widespread adoption of technology, many surgical patients are being offered virtual appointments in

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