Mouse study suggests parental response to infant distress is innate but adapts to change — ScienceDaily

A National Institutes of Health study in mice suggests that parents have an innate capacity to respond to an infant’s cries for help and this capacity may serve as a foundation from which a parent learns to adjust to an infant’s changing needs. The study was conducted by Robert C. Froemke, Ph.D., of New York University School of Medicine, and colleagues. It appears in Nature.

When housed with mice who have given birth, unmated female mice will assist with the care of the newborn pups. The researchers evaluated the ability of such babysitter mice to respond to a variety of recorded newborn distress cries. These included typical distress cries as well as a range of cries that had been digitally altered — sped up or slowed down to include more or fewer syllables than typical distress vocalizations.

Experienced babysitters responded to typical distress cries 80% of the time, compared

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Global Baby Food and Infant Formula Market 2020 Emerging Technologies, Opportunity Assessment, Projections and Future Opportunities by 2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 27, 2020 (CDN Newswire via Comtex) —
The latest published report namely World Baby Food and Infant Formula Market Research Report 2025 added by MarketandResearch.biz offers an insightful take on the historical data of the market and predictions for 2020 to 2025 time-period. The report provides an understanding of the global Baby Food and Infant Formula industry competitors, the sales channel, growth potential, potentially disruptive trends, industry product innovations and the value/volume of size, market segments, and market share of the best actors/products. Current market trends and dynamics are assessed which helps in mapping the track of the global market. A chapter-wise format has been used to ease the readability and complexity of the data. Each chapter is further categorized into its respective segments containing well-structured data.

Market Competition:

The competitive landscape of the global Baby

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Study shows reassuring initial findings for infant health — ScienceDaily

Infants born to women with COVID-19 showed few adverse outcomes, according to the first report in the country of infant outcomes through eight weeks of age.

The study, led by researchers at UC San Francisco, suggests that babies born to mothers infected with the virus generally do well six to eight weeks after birth, however there was a higher rate of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions reported if the mothers had COVID-19 up to two weeks prior to delivery.

Among 263 infants in the study, adverse outcomes — including preterm birth, NICU admission, and respiratory disease — did not differ between those born to mothers testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 and those born to mothers testing negative. No pneumonia or lower respiratory tract infection were reported through eight weeks of age.

The study is published as a prepublication accepted manuscript in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

“The babies are doing well,

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