Schiff: If Trump wanted more infections ‘would he be doing anything different?’

Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffSchiff: If Trump wanted more infections ‘would he be doing anything different?’ EXCLUSIVE: Intelligence chief briefed lawmakers of foreign influence threats to Congress House panel urges intelligence community to step up science and technology efforts MORE (D-Calif.) on Thursday tore into President TrumpDonald John TrumpDes Moines mayor says he’s worried about coronavirus spread at Trump rally Judiciary Committee Democrats pen second letter to DOJ over Barrett disclosures: ‘raises more questions that it answers’ Trump asks campaign to schedule daily events for him until election: report MORE’s handling of the coronavirus, warning that a rally he plans to hold at the White House on Saturday runs the risk of spreading the illness. 

“Donald Trump held a super-spreader event at the White House. Now he wants to hold another big rally there, and still refuses to wear a mask. I don’t think Donald Trump wants

Read More
Read More

Coronavirus: The science is simple – but can a three-tier system in England really drive down infections? | UK News

The autumn surge in COVID-19 has shown just how hard it is to suppress a highly infectious virus.

Sky data shows 50 areas in England have endured local restrictions since the national lockdown was lifted back in July.

But just one – Luton – has ever come out of restrictions, with local people praised by the prime minister in the House of Commons for following health guidance.

Just a day later the town was once again classified as an area of concern after another rise in cases.

Handwashing, masks and social distancing slow the spread of the virus, but they don’t seem to stop it.

Nationwide cases are rising, with the R number above one, indicating that the epidemic is growing exponentially.

But figures from Imperial College’s REACT study show there is huge variation across England.

In London the R number is estimated to be just below one. But in

Read More
Read More

Innovation could improve detection of COVID-19 infections

COVID-19
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

A multidisciplinary research team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a way to increase the sensitivity of the primary test used to detect the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19. Applying their findings to computerized test equipment could improve our ability to identify people who are infected but do not exhibit symptoms.


The team’s results, published in the scientific journal Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, describe a mathematical technique for perceiving comparatively faint signals in diagnostic test data that indicate the presence of the virus. These signals can escape detection when the number of viral particles found in a patient’s nasal swab test sample is low. The team’s method helps a modest signal stand out more clearly.

“Applying our technique could make the swab test up to 10 times more sensitive,” said Paul Patrone, a NIST physicist and a co-author on the

Read More
Read More

Coronavirus infections, hospitalizations keep decreasing across California

Coronavirus infections and deaths continue to slow down across California, as the seven-day infection rate and hospitalizations drop to their lowest points in months.

Since peaking in July, both new cases and hospitalizations steadily cooled off throughout August and September. Now, the state’s seven-day new case average has decreased to 3,201 cases as of Friday — the lowest it’s been since mid-June, according to data compiled by this news organization, and about one-third of the 9,000-plus average daily cases reported during the July peak.

Hospitalizations have plummeted even more dramatically. Just 2,339 confirmed COVID-19 patients across California were hospitalized as of Thursday, when data was most recently available — the fewest since early April. Los Angeles County, which has long been one of the pandemic’s statewide epicenters, makes up about one-third of those patients with 698 hospitalizations, marking a nearly 70% decrease since its peak of more than 2,000 in

Read More
Read More

NY Rolls Out Phone App To ID Coronavirus Infections [POLL]

NEW YORK — New York unleashed another weapon in its arsenal to fight the new coronavirus. This one will reside on your smartphone.

At a news conference Thursday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced the state had launched its new COVID Alert NY app.

He said the free app uses the phone’s built-in Bluetooth technology to alert the phone’s owner that they have been in close contact with another person who is infected with the virus.

Close contact, according to the app, is defined as being within 6 feet of someone for more than 10 minutes.

Cuomo said the app was really creative and could make a big difference.

Even though the state has about 19 million residents, there are just 15,000 contact tracers, or as Cuomo calls them “disease detectives.”

He said the app could help identify faster those who have been potentially been exposed to the new coronavirus.

“Testing is

Read More
Read More

Biomedical sciences researchers find new way to prevent and cure rotavirus, other viral infections — ScienceDaily

A combination of two substances secreted by the immune system can cure and prevent rotavirus infection, as well as potentially treat other viral infections that target epithelial cells, which cover body surfaces such as skin, blood vessels, organs and the urinary tract, according to researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.

Rotavirus, which causes severe, life-threatening diarrhea in young children and moderate gastrointestinal distress in adults, leads to thousands of deaths in children annually, particularly in developing countries where rotavirus vaccines are only moderately effective. Rotavirus is an RNA virus that primarily infects intestinal epithelial cells.

The substances identified in the study, officially known as cytokines, are interleukin 18 (IL-18) and interleukin 22 (IL-22). IL-18 and IL-22 are produced when the body detects a protein in the whip-like appendage of bacteria.

The study, which investigated how these cytokines inhibit rotavirus infection, found when mice were treated

Read More
Read More

Coronavirus infections among school-age kids rose in the summer, CDC says

Keen to send the nation’s kids back to reopened schools, President Trump has called children “virtually immune,” “essentially immune” and “almost immune” to the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.



a group of people sitting at a table: Second-graders listen to teacher Darsi Green at Weaverville Elementary School in California. (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)


© Provided by The LA Times
Second-graders listen to teacher Darsi Green at Weaverville Elementary School in California. (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)

But a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention underscores how wrong those assertions are.

Children can catch, suffer and die from the coronavirus, according to the report released Monday. Between March 1 and Sept. 19, at least 277,285 schoolchildren in 38 states tested positive for the virus.

And 51 of them — including 20 children between ages 5 and 11 — died of COVID-19. In all, 3,189 children between 5 and 17 were hospitalized.

School-aged children with asthma and other chronic lung diseases accounted for roughly 55% of those who tested positive, and almost 10%

Read More
Read More