Why Scientists Should Stop Misusing Science To Influence The Election

Earlier this month, the editors of Scientific American, published an all-out, endorsement of Joe Biden for President—something unprecedented in the journal’s 175 year history. Then, last week, all of the New England Journal of Medicine’s editors signed a scathing review of the Trump administration’s handling of the COVID-19 emergency, calling for Trump to be voted out of office.

In truth, both editorials offer several valid criticisms of the administration on scientific grounds. And to be clear: The present article is not making any counter-endorsement of Donald Trump—far from it.

Rather, we pose an important question: Are high-profile scientists crossing a dangerous line by using their trusted platforms to influence the election? Based on behavioral science, we believe they are and their actions come at the risk of diminishing the public’s trust in

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As Instagram turns 10, influence still growing

The photo and video sharing app has more than 1 billion users.

This week marks 10 years since the founding of Instagram, the hugely popular social media app that boasts more than a billion users.

Sarah Frier is the author of “No Filter: The Inside Story of Instagram.” She says Instagram’s growth over the last decade, especially after it was acquired by Facebook for $1 billion in 2012, is widespread and easy to see.

“It’s a platform where you can look around you and see the impact of the app, in a way that you can’t as easily see the impact of a Facebook or a Twitter,” Frier said.

One of the most prominent Instagram features is its photo-editing tools: namely, its selection of colorful filters. Frier says the customization that Instagram affords its users has produced millions of eye-catching photos.

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Factors that influence patterns in protein distribution — ScienceDaily

In plants, many proteins are found at only one end of a cell, giving them a polarity like heads and tails on a coin.

Often, cells next to each other have these proteins at the same end, like a stack of coins with heads all facing up. This protein patterning is critical for how plant cells orient and coordinate themselves to produce the leaves, flowers, stems and roots that adorn our gardens and provide us with all our food and the oxygen we breathe.

Previously it’s been unclear how this head-to-tail protein patterning is produced: can it arise within each cell, or does it depend on a collective effort of many cells working together?

A new paper, published in Current Biology has found that even cells in isolation can become polarised to create the head to tail pattern, and that this polarity can orient how the cell grows.

The team,

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Pompeo delivers warning to Italy over China’s economic influence, 5G

By Angelo Amante

ROME (Reuters) – U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo delivered a warning to Italy over its economic relations with China on Wednesday, and described Chinese mobile telecoms technology as a threat to Italy’s national security and the privacy of its citizens.

“The foreign minister and I had a long conversation about the United States’ concerns at the Chinese Communist Party trying to leverage its economic presence in Italy to serve its own strategic purposes,” Pompeo told a joint news conference with Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio.

“The United States also urges the Italian government to consider carefully the risks to its national security and the privacy of its citizens presented by technology companies with ties to the Chinese Community Party.”

Di Maio said the Italians were aware of U.S. concerns over Chinese 5G technology, and “fully realise the responsibility faced by every country when dealing with security”.

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Antiferromagnet lattice arrangements influence phase transitions — ScienceDaily

New research published in EPJ B reveals that the nature of the boundary at which an antiferromagnet transitions to a state of disorder slightly depends on the geometry of its lattice arrangement.

Calculations involving ‘imaginary’ magnetic fields show how the transitioning behaviours of antiferromagnets are subtly shaped by their lattice arrangements.

Antiferromagnets contain orderly lattices of atoms and molecules, whose magnetic moments are always pointed in exactly opposite directions to those of their neighbours.

These materials are driven to transition to other, more disorderly quantum states of matter, or ‘phases,’ by the quantum fluctuations of their atoms and molecules — but so far, the precise nature of this process hasn’t been fully explored. Through new research published in EPJ B, Yoshihiro Nishiyama at Okayama University in Japan has found that the nature of the boundary at which this transition occurs depends on the geometry of an antiferromagnet’s lattice arrangement.

Nishiyama’s

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Science untangles the elusive power and influence of hope in our lives

<span class="caption">Traditional dancers celebrate Hari Raya, the end of Ramadan. </span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://unsplash.com/photos/pKyY_fosG90" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Photo by Aniq Danial for Unsplash">Photo by Aniq Danial for Unsplash</a>, <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:CC BY-ND">CC BY-ND</a></span>
Traditional dancers celebrate Hari Raya, the end of Ramadan. Photo by Aniq Danial for Unsplash, CC BY-ND

On Erin Gruwell’s first day as a high school English teacher, she faced a classroom of 150 “at risk” freshmen. Most of these kids, statistically, were going to fail. They were tough, their young lives already defined by poverty, gangs, violence and low expectations. These students, she wrote, knew nearly every “four-letter word” except one: hope.

Yet four years later, every one of her “at risk” students at Wilson High School in Long Beach, CA, had graduated from high school. More than half went on to graduate from college. The stories written by Gruwell’s students were published as a book called “The Freedom Writers Diary”. It became a New York Times bestseller and in 2007 was made into a major motion picture called “Freedom Writers” starring Hilary Swank.

<span class="caption">Graduation carries many messages of hope.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://unsplash.com/photos/mUd_SVGiFrA" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Photo by Marleena Garris for Unsplash.">Photo by Marleena Garris for Unsplash.</a>, <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:CC BY-ND">CC BY-ND</a></span>
Graduation carries many messages of
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Variation in genes associated with viral entry of SARS-CoV-2 unlikely to influence COVID-19 morbidity and mortality, study finds — ScienceDaily

A comprehensive search of genetic variation databases has revealed no significant differences across populations and ethnic groups in seven genes associated with viral entry of SARS-CoV-2.

African Americans and Latinos in the United States and ethnic minorities in the United Kingdom are disproportionately affected by COVID-19. They are more likely to develop severe symptoms and also show significantly higher mortality compared with other regional and ethnic groups.

To investigate if this disparity could be caused by genetic variation, a team of three researchers — including Assistant Professor Ji-Won Lee of Hokkaido University’s Graduate School of Dental Medicine — surveyed publicly available databases of genomic variants, including gnomAD, the Korean Reference Genome Database, TogoVar (a Japanese genetic variation database) and the 1000 Genomes Project. They studied variants across multiple regional and ethnic groups in seven genes known to play roles in viral entry into host cells and recognition of viral RNA

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10 Big Tech Trends That Will Influence Tomorrow’s Workplace

With COVID-19 prompting office closures and a sudden shift to remote work, companies have had to adapt to and learn new tech on the fly in recent months, and change is still coming. Even if your organization has adjusted successfully, the “new normal” is an ever-moving target, especially when it comes to technology.

As top industry leaders, the members of Forbes Technology Council strive to identify upcoming tech trends and their potential impact before they arrive. Below, they predict the top 10 trends coming to the workplace and explain how your company can prepare for them.

1. On-Demand Workspaces

Once the pandemic subsides, a large portion of the workforce will continue to stay remote and visit physical offices as necessary. Corporations have to move to on-demand workspaces. Building systems have to

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Study investigates the influence of lockdown on geodetic measurements — ScienceDaily

Emerging use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) makes it possible to continuously measure shallow changes in elevation of Earth surface. A study by the University of Bonn now shows that the quality of these measurements may have improved significantly during the pandemic, at least at some stations. The results show which factors should be considered in the future when installing GPS antennas. More precise geodetic data are important for assessing flood risks and for improving earthquake early warning systems. The journal Geophysical Research Letters now reports on this.

A number of countries went into politically decreed late hibernation at the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. Many of those affected by the lockdown suffered negative economic and social consequences. Geodesy, a branch of the Earth Science to study Earth’s gravity field and its shape, on the other hand, has benefited from the drastic reduction in human activity. At least that

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