COVID-19 frequently causes neurological injuries — ScienceDaily

Without directly invading the brain or nerves, the virus responsible for COVID-19 causes potentially damaging neurological injuries in about one in seven infected, a new study shows. These injuries range from temporary confusion due to low body-oxygen levels, to stroke and seizures in the most serious cases, say the study authors.

Led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, the study showed no cases of brain or nerve inflammation (meningitis or encephalitis), indicating no immediate invasion of these organs by the pandemic virus, SARS-CoV-2.

While this should reassure patients, the neurological complications of COVID-19 should be taken seriously because they dramatically raise a patient’s risk of dying while still in hospital (by 38 percent), researchers say. Such adverse effects also raise a coronavirus patient’s likelihood (by 28 percent) of needing long-term or rehabilitation therapy immediately after their stay in hospital.

“The results of our study showed no signs that

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Study may advance genetic therapies for blindness and other injuries to the central nervous system — ScienceDaily

Working with fish, birds and mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that some animals’ natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals. Specifically, the researchers found that some genetic pathways that allow many fish and other cold-blooded animals to repair specialized eye neurons after injury remain present in mammals as well, but are turned off, blocking regeneration and healing.

A description of the study, published online by the journal Science on Oct. 1, offers a better understanding of how genes that control regeneration are conserved across species, as well as how they function. This may help scientists develop ways to grow cells that are lost due to hereditary blindness and other neurodegenerative diseases.

“Our research overall indicates that the potential for regeneration is there in mammals, including humans, but some evolutionary pressure has turned it off,” says Seth Blackshaw, Ph.D., professor of

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Amazon warehouse robots ‘increase staff injuries’

Amazon has defended its safety record
Amazon has defended its safety record

Amazon’s use of robots in its warehouses has led to more injuries for human workers, an investigation says.

The Center for Investigative Reporting said it had acquired internal records for 150 warehouses over four years.

At the most common kind of Amazon “fulfilment centre”, serious injuries are 50% higher for those that have robots than those without, it says.

Amazon said its numbers were high because it encouraged the reporting of even minor incidents.

The report from journalist Will Evans was published on the centre’s own news website.

It accuses the giant online retailer of “bald misrepresentations the company has deployed to hide its growing safety crisis”.

It said Amazon officials had “profoundly misled the public and lawmakers” over its safety record.

The company, however, said: “We strongly refute the claims that we’ve misled anyone.

“The reporter is misinterpreting data, and the very internal

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Can mobile tech offer new pathways to improve recovery from serious traumatic injuries?

health
Credit: George Hodan/public domain

Serious traumatic injuries are a health event that can begin a trajectory toward chronic health and social challenges. Research on patient outcomes following traumatic injuries establishes the pervasive nature of injuries’ long-term consequences in physical, psychological, social and economic well-being, which may persist months and even years after an injury hospitalization. In light of this research, emerging interventions have targeted enhanced and coordinated healthcare services to support recovery and address patients’ long-term rehabilitative needs.

Across a numerous of other health conditions, mobile technology-based prevention and treatment interventions have been used successfully to monitor and transform health outcomes. But until now, their potential for addressing inter-related physical, psychological, and social challenges in long-term injury recovery has not been unexplored.

A new study—recently published in mHealth —from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) is the first of its kind to examine how mobile health applications

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