Crayfish ‘trapping’ doesn’t control invasive species

Oct. 13 (UPI) — In Britain, a handful of celebrity chefs have encouraged the practice of crayfish “trapping” to control the invasion of American signal crayfish.

Unfortunately, new research — published Tuesday in the Journal of Applied Ecology — suggests the practice doesn’t work. In fact, crayfish trapping can have a host of unintended consequences.

“Trapping has been linked to a range of risks to our waterbodies, including the spread of invasive species on wet or unclean equipment, as well as the direct capture and release of invasive crayfish to seed new harvestable populations,” study co-author Eleri Pritchard told UPI in an email.

“Sadly, trapping also risks protected native wildlife, and has been responsible for the deaths of otters and water voles,” said Pritchard, a postdoctoral researcher at University College London.

American signal crayfish have led to significant declines of native crayfish in Britain and Europe. The invasive species is

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Researchers study the invasive frog’s role in Galapagos food web

Researchers study the invasive frog’s role in Galapagos food web
Fowler’s snouted treefrog Scinax quinquefasciatus was introduced on the Galápagos archipelago in the late 1990s. Credit: Senckenberg/Ernst

“I have taken pains to verify this assertion, and have found it true that frogs, toads, and newts are absent from most oceanic islands”—thus states Charles Darwin in his well-known work “On the Origin of Species.” For a long time, this observation by the famous naturalist also held true for the Galápagos Islands, which are inextricably linked to his name. “This only changed with the arrival of Fowler’s snouted treefrog Scinax quinquefasciatus on the archipelago in 1997 or 1998,” explains Dr. habil. Raffael Ernst of the Senckenberg Natural History Collections in Dresden, and he continues, “In our study, we examined the interactions of this newcomer with the local, primarily endemic fauna on Galápagos.”

Ernst and his colleagues were curious to find out what role this 33-to-38-millimeter-long frog plays within the island fauna’s food

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Using mobile technology to predict invasive species transmission

Using mobile technology to predict invasive species transmission
Invasive Eurasian milfoil entangled on a boat and trailer. Credit: NYS Department of Environmental Conservation

A cooler full of fish might not be the only thing anglers bring back from a trip to the lake. Unknowingly, they may also be transporting small aquatic “hitchhikers” that attach themselves to boats, motors ― and even fishing gear ― when moving between bodies of water.


Considerable research shows that aquatic invasive species can completely transform ecosystems by introducing disease, out-competing and eating native species, altering food webs, changing physical habitat, devastating water-delivery systems and damaging economies. Furthermore, once established, eradication of nuisance species is near impossible, and management can be extremely difficult and costly.

Although preventative measures have been enacted to reduce their introduction and spread, such as mandatory watercraft inspections, educational programs and even dogs trained in sniffing out invasive species, these aquatic stowaways still manage to find their way into new

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Scientists predict potential spread, habitat of invasive Asian giant hornet

Scientists predict potential spread, habitat of invasive Asian giant hornet
The world’s largest hornet, the Asian giant hornet has been encountered in the Pacific Northwest. New research at Washington State University predicts where the hornet could find suitable habitat, both in the U.S. and globally, and how quickly it could spread, should it establish a foothold. Credit: WSDA

Researchers at Washington State University have predicted how and where the Asian giant hornet, an invasive newcomer to the Pacific Northwest, popularly dubbed the “murder hornet,” could spread and find ideal habitat, both in the United States and globally.


Sharing their discoveries in a newly published article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team found that if the world’s largest hornet gains a foothold in Washington state, it could spread down much of the west coast of the United States.

The Asian giant hornet could also find suitable habitat throughout the eastern seaboard and populous parts of

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