Southampton Chair in Emerging Technologies targets invisible and ubiquitous wearable technologies | Electronics and Computer Science

Published: 2 October 2020

Professor Steve Beeby is one of the world’s foremost experts on electronic textiles and energy harvesting

Professor Steve Beeby from the University of Southampton has been awarded a prestigious Chair in Emerging Technologies to pioneer reliable e-textile systems that are invisible to the wearer.

The Electronics and Computer Science professor is one of just eight UK-based researchers to share £22 million of funding from the Royal Academy of Engineering.

The research will exploit printed active materials, flexible circuit technologies and textile engineering to integrate sensing, electronic and energy harvesting/storage functionality within a single textile.

Professor Beeby, Head of the Smart Electronic Materials and Systems (SEMS) group, says: “We all come into contact with textiles every day of our lives – in our clothes, inside our homes and in our cars – which makes fabrics an ideal platform technology that can, for example, monitor our

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ITMO Researchers Develop Unique Printing Technology for ‘Invisible’ Images

IMAGE

IMAGE: The colorful optical response from the printed image can be easily observed through any LCD screen, including that of a smartphone. These watermarks could potentially be used for added security…
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Credit: Dmitry Lisovsky, ITMO.NEWS

ITMO Researchers Develop Unique Printing Technology for ‘Invisible’ Images

Researchers from ITMO University’s ChemBio Cluster have developed an inkjet printing technology that makes it possible to produce images that can only be seen in polarized light – such as when using a smartphone screen. The new technology will help manufacturers protect their products from forgery. An article concerning the technology was published in ACS Applied Material Interfaces.

In order to achieve these results, the researchers have spent 5 years working on a way to use solution chemistry methods to apply high-resolution organized nanostructures. In large part, the ability to produce images invisible to the naked eye is thanks to the creation of special

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Researchers develop unique printing technology for ‘invisible’ images

Researchers Develop Unique Printing Technology for ‘Invisible’ Images
Credit: Dmitry Lisovsky, ITMO

Researchers from ITMO University’s ChemBio Cluster have developed an inkjet printing technology that makes it possible to produce images that can only be seen in polarized light—such as when using a smartphone screen. The new technology will help manufacturers protect their products from forgery. An article concerning the technology was published in ACS Applied Material Interfaces.


In order to achieve these results, the researchers have spent five years working on a way to use solution chemistry methods to apply high-resolution organized nanostructures. In large part, the ability to produce images invisible to the naked eye is due to the creation of special colloidal ink based on nanoscale cellulose particles capable of orienting themselves on a surface in a special manner.

“The market for printing materials that can protect products from forgery and counterfeiting is growing at a geometric rate. To that end, manufacturers use various

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Hitting the Books: The invisible threat that every ISS astronaut fears

how to astronaut

Workman

Excerpted from How to Astronaut: An Insider’s Guide to Leaving Planet Earth by Terry Virts (Workman). © 2020.


For all the emergency training I went through as an astronaut, I never expected to be holed up in the Russian segment of the ISS, the hatch to the US segment sealed, with my crew waiting and wondering—would the space station be destroyed? Was this the end? As we floated there and pondered our predicament, I felt a bit like the guy in the Alanis Morissette song “Ironic,” who was going down in an airplane crash, thinking to himself, “Now isn’t this ironic?” This is how we ended up in that situation.

Every space station crew trains for all types of emergencies—computer failures, electrical shorts, equipment malfunctions, and more serious fire and air leak scenarios. However, on the International Space Station, the most dangerous of all is an ammonia leak. In

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