A Chemist Aims to Beat a Trump-Loving Republican on Long Island

Democratic House candidate Nancy Goroff in the lab.

Democratic House candidate Nancy Goroff in the lab.
Photo: Goroff for Congress

That “I believe in science” and “I believe in using facts and evidence to solve problems” are rallying cries for a political campaign says a lot about 2020. Yet that’s the pitch of Nancy Goroff, a chemist at Stony Brook University who is the Democratic nominee taking on Rep. Lee Zeldin in a Long Island district.

That appeal to science-based decision-making speaks to the hellscape of modern America that Republicans have created. The Trump administration is the culmination of those efforts, having spent nearly four years sidelining science to disastrous consequences. That includes the acute crisis of a pandemic that has left the U.S. with the highest death toll in the world and one of the highest per capita death rates of any developing country. Hell, the president came down with it after holding a superspreader event.

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Wallops Island Virginia may soon become the second busiest launch site in the country

After the Federal Aviation Administration last month granted Rocket Lab, a commercial launch company, a license to fly its small Electron rocket from the facility, Wallops could soon see a significant increase in launches as the company joins Northrop Grumman in launching from this remote site. While Rocket Lab is largely focused on national security missions, Northrop Grumman launches its Antares rocket to send a spacecraft to the International Space Station on cargo resupply missions at a rate of about two a year, with its next launch scheduled for Friday at 9:16 p.m. Northrop also launches its Minotaur rocket from Wallops.

Rocket Lab wants to launch to orbit as frequently as once a month from Wallops, which would make the facility the second busiest launch site in the country, behind Cape Canaveral, which is on track to fly 39 rockets to orbit this year.

Hoping to give birth to another

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Recent findings suggest the repeated evolution of similar traits in island lizards was not channelled by developmental responses to the environment, as commonly thought — ScienceDaily

Scientists have challenged a popular theory behind the evolution of similar traits in island lizards, in a study published recently in eLife.

The findings in Greater Antillean Anolis lizards provide insights on why creatures often evolve similar physical features independently when living in similar habitats. They suggest that the role of developmental plasticity in shaping adaptive evolution may be less important than commonly thought.

Developmental plasticity refers to how development responds to the environment, in particular the way that an organism’s genetic constitution (or genotype) interacts with its environment during development to produce a particular set of characteristics (or phenotype).

“Anolis lizards that live on all four of the Greater Antillean islands have independently and repeatedly evolved six different body types for maneuvering through their given habitat,” says lead author Nathalie Feiner, Researcher at the Department of Biology, Lund University, Sweden. “As a result, they make a great model

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The 2020 Taiwan Innotech Expo Sustainability Pavilion Presents the Circular Technology Island

With the increasing depletion of the earth’s resources, countries worldwide are more determined about green industrial policies. The European Commission adopted the New Circular Economy Action Plan this March. The UK, Japan, and China will draw up a “marine pollution map” in response to the “marine plastic crisis.” These show that the green industry has become a major field of study for human survival and reducing resource consumption. Therefore, the “Sustainability Pavilion” of the “2020 Taiwan Innotech Expo” will focus on the green industrial chain. The core values are “sustainable living,” “sustainable energy,” and “sustainable resources” tied in with “new agriculture,” “green energy technology,” “circular economy,” and “workplace safety” that reflect the four aspects of life. The pavilion will present more than one hundred technologies that can build a sustainable home in the next ten to twenty years.

The circular economy technology ecosystem demonstrated by the circular technology island

The

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