Double jeopardy for ecologically rare birds and terrestrial mammals

endangered species
Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

Common assumptions notwithstanding, rare species can play unique and essential ecological roles. After studying two databases that together cover all known terrestrial mammals and birds worldwide, scientists from the CNRS, the Foundation for Biodiversity Research (FRB), Université Grenoble Alpes, and the University of Montpellier have demonstrated that, though these species are found on all continents, they are more threatened by human pressures than ecologically common species and will also be more impacted by future climate change. Thus, they are in double jeopardy. The researchers’ findings, published in Nature Communications (October 8, 2020), show that conservation programs must account for the ecological rarity of species.


It has long been thought that rare species contribute little to the functioning of ecosystems. Yet recent studies have discredited that idea: Rarity is a matter not only of the abundance or geographical range of a species, but also of the distinctiveness

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Double jeopardy for ecologically rare birds and terrestrial mammals — ScienceDaily

Common assumptions notwithstanding, rare species can play unique and essential ecological roles. After studying two databases that together cover all known terrestrial mammals and birds worldwide, scientists from the CNRS, the Foundation for Biodiversity Research (FRB), Université Grenoble Alpes, and the University of Montpellier[1] have demonstrated that, though these species are found on all continents, they are more threatened by human pressures than ecologically common species and will also be more impacted by future climate change. Thus they are in double jeopardy. The researchers’ findings, published in Nature Communications (October 8, 2020), show that conservation programmes must account for the ecological rarity of species.

It has long been thought that rare species contribute little to the functioning of ecosystems. Yet recent studies have discredited that idea: rarity is a matter not only of the abundance or geographical range of a species, but also of the distinctiveness of its ecological functions.

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Is Big Tech Putting Teladoc’s Future in Jeopardy?

In the 1930s, 40% of patient encounters with a doctor occurred in the home. By the late 1980s, house calls were down to less than 1% of all physician encounters. It would seem that telehealth could fill some of the gaps in physician access, but for years, adoption has been less than enthusiastic. A 2014 survey found that of those who took advantage of telehealth, just over 80% engaged with their physicians only once per year through online platforms. This year, the coronavirus has drastically shifted patient behaviors. Stay at home orders and the fear of visiting a doctor’s office have driven rapid adoption of telehealth offerings. Analysts expect telehealth visits to top 1 billion before the year’s end, up from pre-pandemic estimates of 36 million virtual visits.

Since 2005, Teladoc Health (NYSE:TDOC) has been using technology to bring doctors to patients where and when it is most convenient. Despite

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