Earth’s space junk problem is getting worse. And there’s an explosive component.

Before humans first started sending objects into Earth orbit, the pocket of space around our planet was clear and clean. But the launch of Sputnik 1 in October of 1957 changed everything. Since then, the space debris has been accumulating, with the amount of useless, defunct satellites vastly outnumbering the operational objects in our orbit.



Lots of space debris is orbiting Earth, including non-functional satellites.


© Provided by Live Science
Lots of space debris is orbiting Earth, including non-functional satellites.

A new annual report from the European Space Agency (ESA) has found that while we have become aware of the problem and taken steps in recent years to mitigate it, those steps are currently not keeping up with the sheer scale of space junk.

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All spacefaring nations have contributed to the problem, which is significant: as more and more defunct objects populate near-Earth space, the risk of collision rises – which, as objects crash and shatter, produces even

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‘Very High Risk’ Two Large Pieces Of Space Junk Will Collide This Week

A defunct Russian satellite and a spent Chinese rocket just floating around high over Earth could smash into each other within a few days, potentially creating a big mess in orbit with potentially dire long-term consequences.

LeoLabs, which tracks space debris, put out the alert on Tuesday warning that the two large hunks of junk will come within 25 meters of each other and have up to a twenty percent chance of colliding Thursday evening.

That’s considered way too close for comfort by space standards. The two objects have a combined mass of 2,800 kilograms and if they were to smash into each other, the “conjunction” could create thousands of new pieces of space junk that would put actual functioning satellites at risk.

Astronomer Jonathan McDowell, who keeps a close eye on objects in orbit, identified the old crafts

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Space junk even worse than what we can see, astronomers say

Tracking space junk

Orbital debris, not functional satellites, make up 95 percent of the objects in this computer-generated illustration of objects in low-Earth orbit. 


NASA

The debris and detritus orbiting above our heads has been multiplying as humans send more and more satellites and rockets into space. All that space junk can pose a threat to operating satellites, and new research suggests that the problem could be much worse than previously thought. 

Astronomers at the University of Warwick attempted to cross-reference detected orbital debris in geosychronous orbit — the altitude where many large communications satellites circle our planet — with objects in public satellite catalogs. They found that more than 75 percent of the debris did not have a match. 

Most of the unknown objects were faint and small, measuring 39 inches (one meter) or less. 

“Many of

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New ‘mini-moon’ set to be captured by Earth might just be space junk



This article, New ‘mini-moon’ set to be captured by Earth might just be space junk, originally appeared on CNET.com.

We’ve got one huge moon looming overhead and you might think “that’s enough moons.” But sometimes, Earth gets greedy and starts pulling in small asteroids for extended stays in orbit. The brief visitations by these “mini-moons” are fairly rare, with only two confirmed so far. The most recent came on Feb. 15, when tiny rock 2020 CD3 was discovered by astronomers at the

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‘Junk Science’ and Roundup Verdicts Examined in the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons

‘Junk Science’ and Roundup Verdicts Examined in the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons

PR Newswire

TUCSON, Ariz., Sept. 21, 2020

TUCSON, Ariz., Sept. 21, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — San Francisco juries have awarded up to $1 billion to persons claiming their cancer resulted from exposure to glyphosate, the active ingredient in the weedkiller Roundup™. In the fall issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons, Paul Driessen, J.D., examines the evidence and the legal process in this case study of litigation that is destroying companies and technology.

(PRNewsfoto/Association of American Physici)
(PRNewsfoto/Association of American Physici)

Law firms are still soliciting clients for lawsuits in which cumulative awards could reach trillions of dollars, Driessen writes.

Introduced in 1974, glyphosate is the world’s most widely used herbicide, he notes. Millions of homeowners, gardeners, and farmers use it regularly to kill weeds. Countless farmers employ it with “Roundup-Ready” corn, soybeans, cotton, and

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