Animal study shows treatment blocks inflammation and protects lungs without killing the flu virus — ScienceDaily

The raging lung inflammation that can contribute to death from the flu can be stopped in its tracks by a drug derived from a naturally occurring human protein, a new animal study suggests.

In mouse studies, all untreated animals given a lethal dose of influenza died within days. All but one of the infected mice treated with the experimental therapy not only survived, but remained energetic and kept weight on — despite having high levels of the flu virus in their lungs.

The experimental treatment is a heavy dose of MG53, part of a family of proteins that plays an essential role in cell membrane repair. Already identified as a potential therapy for conditions ranging from Alzheimer’s disease to persistent skin wounds, MG53 was found in this study to prevent death from a lethal flu infection by blocking excessive inflammation — without having any effect on the virus itself.

The

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Body Camera Footage Shows Detailed Aftermath of Breonna Taylor’s Killing

Body camera footage from the night Breonna Taylor was killed has been released by the Louisville Metro Police Department, CBS News reports. The footage raises questions about why Taylor’s home was targeted. 

More than 250 videos and over 4,000 pages of documents were released on Wednesday, one of which shows Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, outside the home after she had been shot telling the police that his partner had died. 

“Who else is in the apartment?” an officer asks Walker. “Nobody,” he replied. “My girlfriend’s dead.”

The SWAT team then enters the home and designates the residence a crime scene. One officer is then heard saying “We have to be mindful of what we say, we are on camera now.” After checking Taylor’s pulse, a member of the SWAT team can be heard saying “she’s done,” per TMZ. The outlet also points out that the graphic video shows “bloodstains on

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Salute the venerable ensign wasp, killing cockroaches for 25 million years — ScienceDaily

An Oregon State University study has identified four new species of parasitic, cockroach-killing ensign wasps that became encased in tree resin 25 million years ago and were preserved as the resin fossilized into amber.

“Some species of ensign wasps have even been used to control cockroaches in buildings,” OSU researcher George Poinar Jr. said. “The wasps sometimes are called the harbingers of cockroaches — if you see ensign wasps you know there are at least a few cockroaches around. Our study shows these wasps were around some 20 or 30 million years ago, with probably the same behavioral patterns regarding cockroaches.”

Ensign wasps, of the Hymenoptera order and scientifically known as Evaniidae, earned their common name because their abdomen resembles a flag; an ensign is a large flag on a ship, usually flown at the stern or rear of the vessel, that indicates the ship’s nationality.

“As the wasps move

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