Researcher to measure middle schoolers’ data science knowledge in context of social issues

Golnaz Arastoopour Irgens

Golnaz Arastoopour Irgens, assistant professor in Clemson’s education and human development department.
Image Credit: College of Education

A Clemson University faculty member will use an award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to examine middle school students’ data science knowledge and practices through the lens of social issues and gauge students’ sense of empowerment to positively change communities through data science.

Golnaz Arastoopour Irgens, assistant professor of learning sciences in the Clemson University College of Education, said it is a common misconception that data is neutral or free from the influence of social issues or that data has no effect on social issues. She said it is often the case that technology informed by data science, such as search engines or facial recognition software, has been shown to either reinforce discrimination or mischaracterize minority groups.

Because humans design these forms of technology and many more make decisions based on them,

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Can Wisdom, Technology, And Collective Knowledge Build A Better Future?

We are a society of seven billion human beings all with the ability to almost instantly connect. In seconds, we can send a text message or start a video chat with a friend on the other side of the planet. We often take for granted how easy it is to hop on a plane and sip coffee with that same friend a day later.

We are forever interconnected, now more than ever before. Not long ago, it’d be hard to imagine a board meeting without every executive physically sitting in the room. Now, it’s common to hash out quarterly planning strategies or discuss budgets while leaders sit in comfortably in their offices (or homes) thousands of miles apart.

But the perks of an interconnected world is more than just about pleasure, convenience, or savings on travel expenses. According to Rajesh Kasturirangan—the co-founder and CEO of Socratus—bringing together

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Golden raises $14.5M to build a wiki-style database of tech knowledge

Golden is announcing that it has raised $14.5 million in Series A funding. The round was led by previous investor Andreessen Horowitz, with the firm’s co-founder Marc Andreessen joining the startup’s board of directors.

When Golden launched last year, founder and CEO Jude Gomila told me that his goal was to create a knowledge base focused on areas where Wikipedia’s coverage is often spotty, particularly emerging technology and startups.

Gomila told me this week that “companies, technologies and the people involved in them” remain Golden’s strength. In that sense, you could see it as a competitor to Crunchbase, but with a much bigger emphasis on explaining and “clustering” information on big topics like quantum computing and COVID-19, rather than just aggregating key data about companies and people. (By the way, both TechCrunch and the author of this post have their own profile pages, though the latter is woefully empty.)

In

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Study delivers new knowledge on thunderstorms and heavy rain — ScienceDaily

Thunderstorms are weather disturbances characterized by concentrations of thunder, lightning and fierce winds.

When they accumulate in clusters, these storms are often accompanied by violent cloud bursts and flooding, which can devastate the areas affected.

Denmark is no stranger to this phenomenon. In 2011, large parts of Copenhagen were submerged by deluges that lead to roughly 6 billion kroner in damages reported to insurance companies.

In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen shed light on one particular mechanism that has the potential to spawn powerful thunderstorms and cloud bursts:

“We conclude that the atmosphere’s ability to generate large thunderstorms is influenced, among other things, by the difference between the temperature of the earth’s surface during the night versus during the day. If the difference is great, we see more thunderstorms, and subsequently, more cloud bursts,” explains Jan Olaf Härter, an associate professor at the University of Copenhagen’s

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