Evaluating Technology For Ever-Changing Landscapes

Principal, Technology Transformation at 101 Solutions, responsible for our internal technology and our clients technology roadmaps.

Technology has always moved at a rapid pace, and what you did six months ago, let alone two years ago, is likely outdated. Something new has taken its place that promises better results for your organization. We’ve seen this change cycle accelerate rapidly in the months since the global pandemic has taken place, where previous trends were replaced, almost overnight, with new requirements to meet business demands and realities. This leaves a lingering question: How do organizations adjust their thinking to create flexibility and adaptability for an ever-evolving environment as they move forward?

Step 0: Create a foundation through organization.

You should start by seeing if commodity services can be treated as such and working with a partner for those functions based upon the size and complexity of your organization. This will enable

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Bright light bars big-eyed birds from human-altered landscapes

Bright light bars big-eyed birds from human-altered landscapes
In a study of 240 bird species, Florida Museum of Natural History researchers found strong links between eye size, light and habitat use. The findings suggest eye size could be an important predictor for how sensitive certain bird species may be to habitat disturbance. Credit: Ian Ausprey/Florida Museum

New research shows the glaring light in human-altered landscapes, such as livestock pastures and crop fields, can act as a barrier to big-eyed birds, potentially contributing to their decline.


Florida Museum of Natural History researchers found strong links between bird eye size, habitat and foraging technique. Birds that kept to the shade of the forest had larger eyes than those that inhabited the canopy, and birds with relatively small eyes were more numerous in agricultural settings.

The findings suggest eye size is an overlooked, but important trait in determining birds’ vulnerability to changes in their habitat and could help inform future research

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