‘Very High Risk’ Two Large Pieces Of Space Junk Will Collide This Week

A defunct Russian satellite and a spent Chinese rocket just floating around high over Earth could smash into each other within a few days, potentially creating a big mess in orbit with potentially dire long-term consequences.

LeoLabs, which tracks space debris, put out the alert on Tuesday warning that the two large hunks of junk will come within 25 meters of each other and have up to a twenty percent chance of colliding Thursday evening.

That’s considered way too close for comfort by space standards. The two objects have a combined mass of 2,800 kilograms and if they were to smash into each other, the “conjunction” could create thousands of new pieces of space junk that would put actual functioning satellites at risk.

Astronomer Jonathan McDowell, who keeps a close eye on objects in orbit, identified the old crafts

Read More
Read More

Earth grows large crystals, rare elements in just minutes

Oct. 7 (UPI) — Scientists have gained new insights into crystal growth rates inside pegmatites, veinlike formations that host some of the planet’s biggest crystals, as well as valuable elements such as tantalum, niobium and lithium.

Magma cooling time typically controls the size of crystals — when magma cools quickly, crystals remain microscopic, and when it cools slowly, crystals have time to grow.

But pegmatite crystals appear to upend this logic, researchers said in a study published this week in the journal Nature Communications.

“Pegmatites cool relatively quickly, sometimes in just a few years, and yet they feature some of the largest crystals on Earth,” Cin-Ty Lee, professor of geology at Rice University, said in a news release. “The big question is really, ‘How can that be?'”

To determine the growth rates of pegmatite crystals, scientists turned to the rare elements that are often found inside pegmatites.

“It was more

Read More
Read More

Normally an insulator, diamond becomes a metallic conductor when subjected to large strain in a new theoretical model

Normally an insulator, diamond becomes a metallic conductor when subjected to large strain in a new theoretical model
Scanning electron microscope image of a diamond nanoneedle subject to reversible elastic bending deformation. Credit: Amit Banerjee (Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan), Yang Lu (City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong), Ming Dao (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA), and Subra Suresh (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Republic of Singapore)

Long known as the hardest of all natural materials, diamonds are also exceptional thermal conductors and electrical insulators. Now, researchers have discovered a way to tweak tiny needles of diamond in a controlled way to transform their electronic properties, dialing them from insulating, through semiconducting, all the way to highly conductive, or metallic. This can be induced dynamically and reversed at will, with no degradation of the diamond material.


The research, though still at an early proof-of-concept stage, may open up a wide array of potential applications, including new kinds of broadband solar cells, highly efficient LEDs and power electronics, and

Read More
Read More

Findings come from new analysis of large epidemiological dataset — ScienceDaily

Children appear to be at greater risk of having high blood pressure when their mothers had the high blood pressure condition called preeclampsia during pregnancy — but this adverse association may be reduced or even eliminated for children who were exposed to higher levels of vitamin D in the womb, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

The findings, based on an analysis of data on 754 mother-child pairs in Massachusetts, suggest that higher vitamin D levels in pregnancy may help protect children born to preeclamptic women from developing high blood pressure. High blood pressure in childhood is associated in turn with hypertension and heart disease in adulthood.

The study was published online October 5 in JAMA Network Open.

“There is increasing evidence that cardiovascular disease risk is, to a great extent, programmed in the womb, and we now see that it

Read More
Read More

Blast Furnaces Market Will Showcase Neutral Impact During 2020-2024 | Large Installed Base of Blast Furnaces to Boost the Market Growth

The Daily Beast

Photos Show Why Miami Public Schools Could Be the Next Ron DeSantis Coronavirus Debacle

MIAMI—Last week, a few days before Donald Trump revealed he came down with COVID-19, Karla Hernandez-Mats went on a coronavirus safety fact-finding mission in South Florida schools ahead of their reopening on Monday.The president of United Teachers of Dade, the local teachers union, Hernandez-Mats said she and her colleagues conducted surprise inspection visits at 17 Miami-area schools that suggested administrators were still scrambling to put safety measures in place.At Miami Springs Senior High, one of the 17 schools inspected, administrators initially refused to allow her colleague, United Teachers of Dade First Vice-President Antonio White, to enter the building and called a police resource officer on him, the union officials told The Daily Beast.“When administrators act like that, their schools are usually not prepared,” White said in an interview. “That was the case at

Read More
Read More

Preliminary results of two large immune therapy studies show promise in advanced cervical cancer — ScienceDaily

Preliminary results from two independent, phase II clinical trials investigating a new PD-1 (programmed cell death protein 1)-based immune therapy for metastatic cervical cancer suggest potential new treatment options for a disease that currently has limited effective options and disproportionately impacts younger women.

David O’Malley, MD, of The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center — Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC — James), presented the preliminary study results at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Virtual Congress 2020 on Sept. 18. O’Malley was the lead presenter for both trials, which were sponsored by Agenus Inc.

Each study involved more than 150 patients with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer from cancer treatment centers across the United States and Europe. All patients were previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy as a first-line therapy. The two independent but consecutive phase II trials tested a new immune-based agent

Read More
Read More

Megalodon was exceptionally large compared with other sharks

Oct. 5 (UPI) — New analysis of body size among the different genera in the shark order Lamniformes suggests the megatooth shark megalodon was exceptionally massive.

Mature megalodon sharks, which swam the oceans between 15 million and 3.6 million years ago, reached lengths of 50 feet.

For as long as scientists have been finding and studying megalodon fossils, they’ve been aware of the shark’s impressive size, but for the new study, published this week in the journal Historical Biology, researchers wanted to better understand how the species’ size compared with maximum sizes of its many relatives.

Megalodon is a member of a group of sharks known as lamniforms. Most extinct lamniform species are known only by their fossilized teeth, but by analyzing the relationship between teeth and body size among present-day non-planktivorous lamniforms, researchers developed an equation for estimating the body sizes of extinct lamniform shark species.

When researchers estimated

Read More
Read More

Very Large Telescope finds 6 galaxies trapped in web of supermassive black hole

Oct. 1 (UPI) — Using the Very Large Telescope, a powerful observatory in Chile, astronomers have identified six galaxies trapped in the web of a supermassive black hole when the universe was just 900 million years old.

The discovery, described Thursday in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics, helps explain how supermassive black holes got so big so soon after the Big Bang.

“This research was mainly driven by the desire to understand some of the most challenging astronomical objects — supermassive black holes in the early universe,” lead study author Marco Mignoli said in a news release.

“These are extreme systems and to date we have had no good explanation for their existence,” said Mignoli, an astronomer at the National Institute for Astrophysics in Italy.

The findings lend support to the theory that web-like structures of gas fueled the rapid growth of supermassive black holes in the early universe. When

Read More
Read More

18-Foot Python Devours Large Prey Before Villagers, Rescue Caught On Camera

KEY POINTS

  • Villagers spotted the unusual sight and immediately alerted the forest department
  • By the time the officers could arrive at the scene, the reptile had already devoured the animal
  • Python was rescued and released into the wild

A huge python was rescued after it devoured a large prey in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh on Sunday.

Villagers gathered at the scene after they spotted the 18-foot-long python attempting to swallow an animal, which is believed to be a goat. The villagers immediately alerted the forest department, however, by the time the officers could arrive at the scene, the reptile had already devoured the animal.

A video of the rescue showed the bloated python unable to move after swallowing its prey. The officers and the villagers then tied a rope around the reptile and pull it toward a truck. The reptile is then raised from the ground using logs

Read More
Read More