Cameras that can learn what they are viewing — ScienceDaily

Intelligent cameras could be one step closer thanks to a research collaboration between the Universities of Bristol and Manchester who have developed cameras that can learn and understand what they are seeing.

Roboticists and artificial intelligence (AI) researchers know there is a problem in how current systems sense and process the world. Currently they are still combining sensors, like digital cameras that are designed for recording images, with computing devices like graphics processing units (GPUs) designed to accelerate graphics for video games.

This means AI systems perceive the world only after recording and transmitting visual information between sensors and processors. But many things that can be seen are often irrelevant for the task at hand, such as the detail of leaves on roadside trees as an autonomous car passes by. However, at the moment all this information is captured by sensors in meticulous detail and sent clogging the system with

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Pittsburgh-Area School Districts Use Technology To Help Students Learn In New Ways

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Teaching remotely is a big challenge, but many local school districts are taking advantage of new technology.

Teachers at Pine-Richland schools wear wireless microphones and use tracking cameras, document cameras and interactive display boards with mounted cameras so students both in school and at home can see the same things.

In the Elizabeth Forward and Avonworth school districts, teachers are using Gizmos virtual science labs, which allows students to manipulate the variables and work together.



a person standing in front of a computer


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Elizabeth Forward Middle School eighth-grader Joseph Maksin grew virtual plants.

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“You got to pick what type of plant you were using, how much soil, the amount of sun it was getting, how much water it was getting, and it would show a time-lapse of how it was growing,” said Maksin.

His pre-biology teacher at Elizabeth Forward Middle School, Rachel Lintelman, said, “I

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What can we learn from mathematical modeling

Human heart in space: What can we learn from mathematical modeling
Examples of pressures (P) and flow rates (Q) throughout the human body: on Earth (blue) and spaceflight (red) configurations. Credit: Politecnico di Torino

Human spaceflight has been fascinating man for centuries, representing the intangible need to explore the unknown, challenge new frontiers, advance technology and push scientific boundaries further. A key aspect of long-term human spaceflight is the physiological response and consequent microgravity (0G) adaptation, which has all the features of accelerated aging involving almost every body system: muscle atrophy and bone loss, onset of balance and coordination problems, loss of functional capacity of the cardiovascular system.


Research published recently in npj Microgravity and conducted by Caterina Gallo, Luca Ridolfi and Stefania Scarsoglio shows that human spaceflight reduces exercise tolerance and ages astronauts’ heart.

The study is based on a mathematical model which allowed to investigate some spaceflight mechanisms inducing cardiovascular deconditioning, that is the adaptation of the cardiovascular system

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What we can learn from 36 years of prescribed burns at this Tahoe state park

I’m standing in a stretch of woods. The trunks of towering trees are charred black and some of the lowest hanging pine needles are singed a burnt orange. Light streams through an open canopy. A sapling of cedar hardly bigger than the palm of my hand has just started to poke its head above a thin layer of pine needles.

This stretch of forest has obviously seen fire recently, but instead of destruction, I see growth and regeneration. The forest just feels healthier, spacious.

“What I see here is a really successful prescribed burn,” says Courtney Rowe, a senior environmental scientist with the California State Parks Sierra District. We are walking through the Edwin L. Z’berg Natural Reserve at Sugar Pine Point State Park on Tahoe’s West Shore with forester Rich Adams and burn boss David Murray. Adams directs the prescribed burn program here, while Murray manages the fire crew.

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Econ 3.0? What economists can contribute to (and learn from) the pandemic

For evidence that mainstream economists are taking the challenge of covid-19 seriously, look no further than the comments of Gabriela Ramos, chief of staff at the OECD, at a conference in April: “For many institutions, including the OECD, which has traditionally emphasized the need for efficiency, it is not easy to accept that we should build slack, buffers, and spare capacity into our systems…but as we now see this is literally a question of life or death.”

This is the first plank of the profession’s response to the pandemic: questioning whether national economies, individual companies, and markets should be optimized to maximize return on capital, or to ensure resilience in the face of a crisis. 

The second clear trend concerns methodology and a willingness for economists to move away from strict mathematical models. “The pandemic has, in many cases, decreased our reliance on traditional economic metrics such as GDP,” says

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What Can We Learn Today From Science and Technology Development in WWII?

Anti-aircraft guns in London during the Blitz of 1940 were mostly for show. It was extremely difficult to shoot down an aircraft. The shells launched to explode in an enemy bomber’s flight path had to be timed to one-fortieth of a second, explained Future Tense fellow Jaime Holmes in a recent online event co-sponsored by Future Tense and Issues in Science and Technology. A timing device a second off would mean an explosion 2,000 feet from its intended target.



a herd of cattle standing on top of a building: The aftermath of a V-1 flying bomb strike in central London, June 1944 U.S. Army Signal Corps/National Archives


© U.S. Army Signal Corps/National Archives
The aftermath of a V-1 flying bomb strike in central London, June 1944 U.S. Army Signal Corps/National Archives

It’s no surprise, then, that at the start of the Blitz it took about 20,000 shells to shoot down a single airplane.

Developing a solution to the problem—an electronic sensor within a shell that could detect a nearby aircraft and blow up in its proximity—was simple

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