Creating fuel from thin air with artificial leaves

Device
Artificial leaves could one day provide fuel

The sun produces more than enough energy for human activities, but we still can’t capture enough of it, points out Erwin Reisner, energy and sustainability professor at Cambridge University.

He heads a team of researchers trying to capture more of that free energy.

While solar panels have made big advances in recent years, becoming cheaper and more efficient, they just provide electricity, not storable liquid fuels, which are still in great demand.

“If you look at the global energy portfolio and what’s needed, electricity only covers maybe 20-25%. So the question is when we have covered that 25%, what do we do next?” asks Prof Reisner.

His answer is to look to nature: “Plants are a huge inspiration, because they have learned over millions of years how to take up sunlight and store the energy in energy carriers.

“I really believe that artificial

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Hotel thief leaves smartphone in room after seeing the light: Orange Police Blotter

ORANGE, Ohio

Disturbance, theft, simple assault: Orange Place

Police responded to the Hampton Inn around 3:30 a.m. on Sept. 25 after a Cleveland woman, 22, initially reported someone was crawling out of her second-floor window. She later explained that she had met a Cleveland man, 28, in the parking lot and invited him up to her room, but when he became too intoxicated, she asked him to leave.

An argument ensued, and when the man punched her in the face, she struck him with a lamp before he fled with $200 that belonged to her. The desk clerk said he refused when the frantic suspect came to the lobby and asked to be let back in the room in order to retrieve the iPhone he had left behind, at which point he went out through the main entrance.

Police and hotel staff later found the room’s broken door knob

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First study of its kind reveals the benefits of droplets on leaves — ScienceDaily

Small watery droplets on the edges of blueberry bush leaves are loaded with nutrients for many insects, including bees, wasps and flies, according to a Rutgers-led study, the first of its kind.

The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, suggests that these droplets are an important but underexplored feature in plants, with profound implications for insects in agricultural and natural ecosystems.

“Our study shows for the first time that plant ‘guttation’ — fluid from sap secreted at the edges and tips of leaves — is a nutrient-rich source of food for insects,” said senior author Cesar Rodriguez-Saona, a professor and extension specialist in the Department of Entomology in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

Many insects such as bees, wasps and flies drink the small droplets, which arise on nights with high levels of moisture in soil,

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