Science research and the lessons of World War II | American Enterprise Institute

World War II seems like a pretty obvious example of successful industrial policy, at least in the sense of government directing science research toward specific goals. This from the new working paper “Organizing Crisis Innovation: Lessons from World War II” by Daniel P. Gross and Bhaven N. Sampat: “The [Office of Scientific Research and Development]’s priorities were demand-driven, focused on solving specific military problems, and led by input from the Armed Services. The bulk of its work was applied in nature, and while basic studies were sometimes needed, the urgency of the crisis meant that it mostly had to take basic science as given and to put it to work.”

And Washington’s effort at Big Science produced many notable successes. In just a half-decade, the paper notes, there were major advances across a range of technologies: radar, electrical engineering, jet propulsion, optics, chemistry, and atomic fission. That final one, of

Read More
Read More

StanChart Tech Boss Heeds Bank’s Post-Wuhan Stress Lessons: Q&A

Michael Gorriz

Courtesy of Standard Chartered

From sourcing 2,000 laptops for computer-less staff to boosting remote working capacity 20-fold, Michael Gorriz spent the year at the center of a global bank’s scramble to cope with an office-emptying pandemic.

Standard Chartered Plc’s chief information officer had a ringside seat for the start of the crisis. While his bank is headquartered in London, the German-born Gorriz works from Singapore — a five-hour flight to Wuhan, the Chinese epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak. StanChart’s branch in Wuhan was locked down, giving an early inkling of what life under Covid-19 might be like.

The pandemic drove thousands of older customers online for the first time, stress-testing technology for a company that’s bet heavily on digital banking. The Wuhan outbreak also gave Gorriz a unique perspective on enabling working from home at a time when the crisis still seemed remote in

Read More
Read More

Thank you for posting: Smoking’s lessons for regulating social media

Day by day, the evidence is mounting that Facebook is bad for society. Last week Channel 4 News in London tracked down Black Americans in Wisconsin who were targeted by President Trump’s 2016 campaign with negative advertising about Hillary Clinton—“deterrence” operations to suppress their vote.

A few weeks ago, meanwhile, I was included in a discussion organized by the Computer History Museum, called Decoding the Election. A fellow panelist, Hillary Clinton’s former campaign manager Robby Mook, described how Facebook worked closely with the Trump campaign. Mook refused to have Facebook staff embedded inside Clinton’s campaign because it did not seem ethical, while Trump’s team welcomed the opportunity to have an insider turn the knobs on the social network’s targeted advertising. 

Taken together, these two pieces of information are damning for the future of American democracy; Trump’s team openly marked 3.5 million Black Americans for deterrence in their data set, while

Read More
Read More

Lessons Learned From The Internet’s First Domain Names

Jeffrey is the Co-Founder of Saw.com, focusing on domain sales and acquisitions. Visit Saw.com if you want to purchase a domain.

I love the internet. I love domain names, and I also love history. Being at the age I am, I had the opportunity to see the internet start as the wild west when it was thousands of message boards, chatrooms and loads of pirated music. The good old days were back when one of the most well-known taglines was “You’ve got mail,” Netscape was your browser, Clippy was crashing computers everywhere, Napster/Limewire was pumping music through Winamp, and Minesweeper was the staple game on every Windows Operating system.

This was a place where large corporations didn’t know what to do about the internet or perhaps even attempt to understand it. Some of these companies saw the internet as a fad and did not capitalize on the opportunity that

Read More
Read More

Using Technology to Tailor Lessons to Each Student

Joel Rose, a former teacher, and Chris Rush, a technology and design expert, are the brains behind Teach to One 360, which is based in New York. When Mr. Rose first started teaching fifth grade in Houston in the 1990s, he was stunned by the number of students whose math skills were two or even three grade levels behind. “Some students were as low as the second grade, and other students as high as the eighth grade, and others in between,” he said.

This one-size-fits-all system is broken, he said, adding, “It is wildly outdated.”

So, in 2009, while working for the New York City schools chancellor, Mr. Rose partnered with Mr. Rush to create School of One (later renamed Teach to One 360), a technology driven math program for students in grades five through 12.

Here’s how it works: Students take a 90-minute MAP test, which is a standardized

Read More
Read More

3 Lessons Rebecca Alvarez Story Learned While Raising Capital For A Sexual Wellness Marketplace

When Rebecca Alvarez Story first started Bloomi, a sexual wellness marketplace, she understood that the gap she was trying to fill was one women had traditionally been encouraged to not speak about openly. 

Her mission was to solve for that exact problem. 

“By normalizing conversations around sex and wellness I hope other women, especially other women of color like myself, can feel empowered to embrace their sexuality and make informed decisions for their bodies,” she’d previously shared with Forbes. “It’s important that we talk about sex, because it’s a big part of our overall physical and emotional well-being.”

Now, as Bloomi has entered a round of crowdfunding and updated its strategy to meet the moment, Story has an even clearer view of how mission and product will intertwine. 

“When COVID hit, I began to lead free workshops covering a variety of intimacy and sexual

Read More
Read More

Lessons from ex-Google employees about productivity and culture

Ex-Google marketeer Ismail Jeilani founded edtech platform Scoodle.

Ismail Jeilani



Ismail Jeilani


How long were you at Google, and what did you do while you were there?

I was at Google for about a year as an associate account strategist.

In simple English, that meant helping businesses in the UK and Ireland improve their advertising campaigns. By showing the right ads to the right people at the right time, both consumers and businesses are happy.

What did you learn while working there?

I obviously learned a lot about digital marketing. By helping so many businesses, I was able to get pretty comfortable setting up and optimizing marketing campaigns for businesses of almost any size.

The importance of being around smart people is that – without realising – you raise your standards and you raise your expectations of success. This can be really powerful, regardless of what you do in the future.

I

Read More
Read More