How A Pandemic Pushed Us To Embrace A Long Overdue Future Of Work

Founder & CEO of SlicedBrand, a global PR agency with an award winning team, she’s successfully led PR for thousands of technology companies

The pandemic has created a new thought process to reconcile when it comes to how we physically operate as a business. I immediately recognized that the fear of unleashing employees faded, if only out of necessity. Optimism grew, and ultimately everything new started to just seem normal. Now, it’s hard to even picture the days of our old office-bound lives.

Approximately six months into a forced remote office experiment, here are a few of the things I’ve learned.

My employees don’t need an office to be productive.

While I’ve been able to run a brand completely remotely, widespread adoption of a complete work-at-home workforce hasn’t been as rapid as industry leaders may have hoped.

The novel coronavirus kicked into overdrive the move to a fully

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Covid on Smartphone? Here’s how long it can stay

This means, you should disinfect or clean your smartphone periodically.

The research, undertaken at the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness (ACDP) in Geelong, found that SARS-CoV-2 survived longer at lower temperatures and tended to survive longer on non-porous or smooth surfaces such as glass, stainless steel and vinyl, compared to porous complex surfaces such as cotton.

The study, published in Virology Journal, showed that the virus survived longer on paper banknotes than plastic banknotes.

“While the precise role of surface transmission, the degree of surface contact and the amount of virus required for infection is yet to be determined, establishing how long this virus remains viable on surfaces is critical for developing risk mitigation strategies in high contact areas,” said one of the study authors Debbie Eagles, Deputy Director of ACDP.

“How long they can survive and remain infectious depends on the type of virus, quantity, the surface, environmental conditions

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New method can pinpoint cracks in metal long before they cause catastrophes — ScienceDaily

When metallic components in airplanes, bridges and other structures crack, the results are often catastrophic. But Johns Hopkins University researchers have found a way to reliably predict the vulnerabilities earlier than current tests.

In a paper published today in Science, Johns Hopkins University researchers detail a new method for testing metals at a microscopic scale that allows them to rapidly inflict repetitive loads on materials while recording how ensuing damage evolves into cracks.

“We’re able now to have a more fundamental understanding about what leads up to cracks,” El-Awady said. “The practical implication is that it will allow us to understand and predict when or how the material is going to fail.”

Whether it is the pounding of vehicles on bridges or shifts in air pressure on airplanes, such continuous change called “cyclic loading” gradually induces slips in the internal molecular structure of the most durable metals until cracks

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The GOP has a long history of ignoring science. Trump turned it into policy.

The resulting litany of falsehoods, misdirection and anti-science policies — during the pandemic, for instance, Trump has claimed that the coronavirus would just “disappear,” insisted that it doesn’t harm children, said covid-19 “affects virtually nobody” (1 million deaths worldwide), endorsed sham treatments such as injecting bleach and dismissed the ability of masks to stop the virus’s spread — looks like a product of a singular, addled mind. “I have no explanation for why these briefings and the scientific evidence just doesn’t seem to click” with him, former White House coronavirus task force staffer Olivia Troye, who resigned in protest of Trump’s science denialism, recently said. The wealthiest country in history, armed with arguably the best hospitals and smartest doctors anywhere, has registered the most cases, the most deaths and perhaps the most hostile-to-science response of any nation in the world. Experts say tens of thousands of the 212,000 American

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A Chemist Aims to Beat a Trump-Loving Republican on Long Island

Democratic House candidate Nancy Goroff in the lab.

Democratic House candidate Nancy Goroff in the lab.
Photo: Goroff for Congress

That “I believe in science” and “I believe in using facts and evidence to solve problems” are rallying cries for a political campaign says a lot about 2020. Yet that’s the pitch of Nancy Goroff, a chemist at Stony Brook University who is the Democratic nominee taking on Rep. Lee Zeldin in a Long Island district.

That appeal to science-based decision-making speaks to the hellscape of modern America that Republicans have created. The Trump administration is the culmination of those efforts, having spent nearly four years sidelining science to disastrous consequences. That includes the acute crisis of a pandemic that has left the U.S. with the highest death toll in the world and one of the highest per capita death rates of any developing country. Hell, the president came down with it after holding a superspreader event.

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Ancient lizard’s long, crocodile-like snout suggests it carved out a niche in a competitive marine ecosystem — ScienceDaily

A new species of an ancient marine reptile evolved to strike terror into the hearts of the normally safe, fast-swimming fish has been identified by a team of University of Alberta researchers, shedding light on what it took to survive in highly competitive ecosystems.

Gavialimimus almaghribensis, a new type of mosasaur, was catalogued and named by an international research team led by master’s student Catie Strong, who performed the research a year ago as part of an undergrad honours thesis guided by vertebrate paleontologist Michael Caldwell, professor in the Faculty of Science, along with collaborators from the University of Cincinnati and Flinders University.

More than a dozen types of mosasaur — which can reach 17 metres in length and resemble an overgrown komodo dragon — ruled over the marine environment in what is now Morocco at the tail end of the Late Cretaceous period between 72 and 66 million

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Modern Science Didn’t Appear Until the 17th Century. What Took So Long?

The Scientific Revolution of the 17th century yielded the figure of the modern scientist, single-mindedly dedicated to collecting empirical evidence and testing hypotheses against it. Strevens, who studied mathematics and computer science before turning to philosophy, says that transforming ordinary thinking humans into modern scientists entails “a morally and intellectually violent process.” So much scientific research takes place under conditions of “intellectual confinement” — painstaking, often tedious work that requires attention to minute details, accounting for fractions of an inch and slivers of a degree. Strevens gives the example of a biologist couple who spent every summer since 1973 on the Galápagos, measuring finches; it took them four decades before they had enough data to conclude that they had observed a new species of finch.

Credit…Jessica Herman

This kind of obsessiveness has made modern science enormously productive,

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iPhone photography: How to take dreamy long exposure photos with your iPhone camera

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Andrew Hoyle/CNET

The iPhone 11 Pro’s triple camera array takes some of the best images you can get from a phone, and even the iPhone SE‘s single camera captures amazing images that belie its affordable price. But hidden inside these phones, specifically ones launched after the iPhone 6, is a creative trick that lets you transform your everyday images into dreamy long exposure shots.

A long exposure photograph is any image where the shutter has been intentionally left open long enough to blur the motion in the image. Look up pictures of waterfalls and you’ll undoubtedly see images where the raging torrent of water has been smoothed out into this otherworldly flow — that’s a long exposure image. 

To take this sort of image with a DSLR camera, you usually need

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Can the Red Raiders end their long losing streak in Manhattan?

Texas Tech at Kansas State

When: 2:30 p.m. Saturday at Bill Snyder Family Football Stadium in Manhattan, Ks.

Records: Texas Tech (1-1, 0-1 Big 12); Kansas State (1-1, 1-0 Big 12)

Last meeting: Kansas State defeated Texas Tech 30-27 in Lubbock

TV: FS1

What’s on the line?

In the last decade, the Red Raiders only managed to beat the Wildcats once in nine meetings. Heading into the 2010s Texas Tech was riding a five-game winning streak against Kansas State. These two teams would be coming off of similarly season-defining wins had Texas Tech not blown a 15 point lead in the waning moments of last week’s contest against Texas.

For Kansas State, its season has already been deeply confusing. The Wildcats opened with a loss to Arkansas State at home, then upset No. 3 Oklahoma in Norman. Texas Tech badly needs to rebound after nearly pulling off a program-defining upset

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Investors sour on baht, trim long bets on most emerging Asian currencies: Reuters poll

(Reuters) – Investors turned bearish on the Thai baht for the first time in two months, highlighting concerns over the pace of recovery in Southeast Asia’s second-largest economy through the COVID-19 pandemic and a domestic political crisis.

FILE PHOTO: A Thailand Baht note is seen in this illustration photo June 1, 2017. REUTERS/Thomas White/Illustration

Bullish bets on most other emerging Asian currencies were scaled back with the U.S. dollar near two-month highs in recent weeks amid uncertainty leading up to the U.S. Presidential election, while market participants further increased short positions on the Indonesian rupiah IDR=.

Short positions on the baht THB=TH were at their highest since late-April, a fortnightly poll of 12 respondents showed, as the government tries to revive the tourism-reliant economy by approving long-stay visas for foreign tourists, providing tax incentives and cash handouts.

Last month, the Thai central bank left interest rates unchanged and upgraded

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