iPhone 12 Expected to Have Longer Battery Life Except on iPhone 12 mini

As the announcement of the iPhone 12 lineup nears and leaks consolidate a more final picture of the devices, it seems that battery life may improve across most models in spite of reduced capacities.

Smaller Batteries?

International certifications spotted in July seemed to reveal the battery capacities of each of the four ‌iPhone 12‌ models.

  • 5.4-inch ‌‌iPhone 12‌‌ mini (model A2471) – 2,227mAh
  • 6.1-inch ‌‌iPhone 12‌‌ (model A2431) – 2,775mAh
  • 6.1-inch ‌‌iPhone 12‌‌ Pro (model A2431) – 2,775mAh
  • 6.7-inch ‌‌iPhone 12‌‌ Pro Max (model A2466) – 3,687mAh

These battery capacities are notably smaller than the iPhone 11 models they are replacing. Apple improved the capacity of its batteries in the iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max last year, which have heavier and thicker batteries than those used in the previous XS and XS Max models from 2018. The ‌‌iPhone 11 Pro Max‌‌ had the largest battery life of

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Leaker: iPhone 12 Lineup to Feature Faster Face ID, Improved Zoom, and Longer Battery Life

Leaker Max Weinbach has today shared new “finalized and revised” information about the upcoming iPhone 12 via his Twitter account @PineLeaks.

Weinbach states that the “most important things” about the new iPhones were already revealed by Chinese Weibo user “Kang” via an extensive leak on Friday, but he does offer some specific new information.

Apple is reportedly still intending to ship the “dynamic zoning algorithm” feature, which could allow for faster Face ID. The notch may only be reduced in width on the 5.4-inch ‌iPhone 12‌ mini due to its smaller size. This would be achieved by arranging the components of the TrueDepth camera system more “tightly,” but at the cost of increasing its height. Alleged images of the ‌iPhone 12‌ mini’s screen emerged in July, which seemed to show a smaller notch.

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North Korea’s Huge New ICBM Casts Doubt on Trump’s ‘No Longer a Nuclear Threat’ Claim

North Korea showcased a series of new weapons at its 75th anniversary military parade marking the founding of the ruling Workers’ Party Saturday, including what South Korea officials say was a new intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM).



a sign on the side of a road: North Korea showcased a new intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) Saturday as part of a military parade celebrating their Workers Party's 75th anniversary.


© Screenshot: NK State TV
North Korea showcased a new intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) Saturday as part of a military parade celebrating their Workers Party’s 75th anniversary.

North Korea has not broadcast a live military parade on television since 2017, when leader Kim Jong Un heightened U.S. tensions by showing off several large ICBMs. The country showed off its “new strategic weapon,” which analysts described as a much larger, liquid fuel ICBM complete with an 11 axle transporter erector launcher.

The first hint of the new weapon came earlier this week when South Korean officials relayed surveillance of thousands of North Korean soldiers in march formation as they displayed what was possibly a new

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New advancements in tech help us stay healthier longer

Digital health gives greater access to experts and makes medicine more precise and personalized. Sponsored by United Healthcare.

SEATTLE — Digital health is gaining in popularity not just because of emerging technologies, but also due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Patients are able to access information, monitor their health, and complete a doctor’s visit through their smartphones or computers. 

“One of the main goals of digital health is for patients to access healthcare and information at any time, 24/7,” said Dr. Patricia Auerbach, Chief Medical Officer of UnitedHealthcare of Washington. “This allows patients to take better charge of their health and allows their providers to stay connected to them, even outside of the office and hospital.”

Telehealth gives healthcare providers the ability to evaluate patients without potential exposure to risks. It was mostly used before COVID-19 for minor issues, like allergies, rashes, or cold symptoms. Now telehealth is being used for

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On 10th birthday, Instagram no longer an escape from reality

Artful photos of sunsets and ice cream are being challenged by more activist content on Instagram as it turns 10 years old in a time of social justice protests, climate crisis, and the pandemic.

Founded in 2010 by Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger, the app had one billion users two years and has grown fast since then, after first capturing the public’s attention with its image filters, and easy photo editing and sharing tools.

But playful pictures, once a hallmark of Instagram, are increasingly seen as off-key when people are “losing jobs, being sick, isolated and depressed, then on top of that the BLM (Black Lives Matter) protests and everything going on with the US election,” reasoned Rebecca Davis.

In 2016 she created ‘Rallyandrise’, an account devoted to helping people engage politically.

“Not that there’s no time and place for pretty photos, but maybe people are trying to find a

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Apple reportedly no longer needs entire Apple Watch returned if Solo Loop doesn’t fit

According to leaker Jon Prosser, Apple has reversed its requirement for users to return their Apple Watch Series 6 if its Solo Loop, or Braided Solo Loop, isn’t the right size for them.

Apple’s original requirement for users to return their entire Apple Watch Series 6 to get a correct-size band meant that some were facing weeks before they could get their Watch back. Now reportedly Apple has decided they can keep the Watch, and just return the Solo Loop, or Braided Solo Loop, for replacement.

Leaker Jon Prosser goes on to say that Apple’s issuing of a replacement

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New technology lets quantum bits hold information for 10,000 times longer than previous record — ScienceDaily

Quantum bits, or qubits, can hold quantum information much longer now thanks to efforts by an international research team. The researchers have increased the retention time, or coherence time, to 10 milliseconds — 10,000 times longer than the previous record — by combining the orbital motion and spinning inside an atom. Such a boost in information retention has major implications for information technology developments since the longer coherence time makes spin-orbit qubits the ideal candidate for building large quantum computers.

They published their results on July 20 in Nature Materials.

“We defined a spin-orbit qubit using a charged particle, which appears as a hole, trapped by an impurity atom in silicon crystal,” said lead author Dr. Takashi Kobayashi, research scientist at the University of New South Wales Sydney and assistant professor at Tohoku University. “Orbital motion and spinning of the hole are strongly coupled and locked together. This is

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