Russia skeptical about participating in lunar Gateway

WASHINGTON — The head of Russia’s space agency said that the lunar Gateway, part of NASA’s Artemis lunar exploration program, is too “U.S.-centric” for it to participate in, even though the Gateway leverages the existing International Space Station partnership.

During a panel featuring the heads of seven space agencies at the International Astronautical Congress Oct. 12, Dmitry Rogozin, director general of Roscosmos, said it was unlikely that his agency would play a major role in the Gateway despite the planned participation of other ISS partners, including Canada, Europe and Japan.

“In our view, the lunar Gateway in its current form is too U.S.-centric, so to speak,” Rogozin said through an interpreter. “Russia is likely to refrain from participating in it on a large scale.”

During a later press conference, Rogozin elaborated on his issues with the Gateway. “The most important thing here would be to base this program on the

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House space subcommittee chair still seeking NASA plan for 2024 lunar landing

WASHINGTON — The chair of the House space subcommittee says NASA has still not convinced her that the agency has a viable plan to return humans to the moon by 2024.

Speaking at a Wilson Center event Oct. 6 about the geopolitics of space, Rep. Kendra Horn (D-Okla.) said she was waiting to see a plan from NASA that explained how the agency’s Artemis program could meet its goal of a human return to the lunar surface in four years.

“We still haven’t seen a plan that shows us we can get to the moon on the 2024 schedule,” she said, including the ability of NASA to manage “multiple, simultaneous, large” development programs and the various demonstrations leading up to that crewed landing.

Such a plan was an element of a NASA authorization bill that she introduced in January with other leaders of the House Science Committee from both parties.

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Spacebit books a second trip to the Moon via NASA’s commercial lunar payload program

UK-based robotic rover startup Spacebit has booked a second payload delivery to the Moon, aboard the Nova-C lander that Intuitive Machines is planning to send in 2021 as part of NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) program. Spacebit already has a berth aboard the Astrobotic Peregrine lander that’s set to go to the Moon in July 2021, flying atop a Vulcan Centaur rocket, and so this would follow quickly on the heels of that mission, with a current mission timeframe of October 2021 to deliver the Intuitive Machines lander via a SpaceX Falcon 9.

Spacebit’s Asagumo 4-legged walking rover is set to fly on that first CLPS mission (which NASA created to source commercial partners for delivering experiments and payloads to the Moon along with over private cargo ahead of its Artemis crewed Moon missions). For this second Nova-C lander launch, Spacebit is preparing a wheeled rover that will carry

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When Is The Next Solar And Lunar Eclipse? They’re Sooner Than You Think

Eclipses are perhaps the most spectacular celestial events of all.

During a lunar eclipse the full moon contain a luscious copper colour for a few hours, while solar eclipses—which can last just a few minutes—often leave onlookers scarred for life. In a good way! In fact, if you’ve ever witnessed a brief totality during a total solar eclipse when the world around you turns into twilight while you get to gawp at the Sun’s precious outer atmosphere—its bright white corona—you’ll know why there are thousands of dedicated eclipse chases who try to see as many as they can.

Trouble is, solar and lunar eclipse is don’t come around very often.

However, there are now a few coming up fast.

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High radiation on moon means lunar bases should be buried for safety

  • NASA recently unveiled the plan for its Artemis program, a series of missions that would return astronauts to the moon. 
  • A new study reveals how much radiation astronauts are exposed to on the lunar surface: a daily dose about 200 times greater than on Earth.
  • NASA wants to build a base on the moon, but the new data suggests it’d be safest to bury such a base under 2.5 feet of moon dirt to protect astronauts from radiation. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

NASA wants to build a permanent base on the moon by the 2030s — a place astronauts could stay for extended visits at the lunar south pole.

But according to a new study, any astronauts who go there would face levels of radiation nearly three times higher than what the astronauts on the space station deal with. In high enough doses, long-term exposure to this

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NASA, Blue Origin to test technology for precise lunar landings

Onboard Blue Origin’s New Shepard rocket will be SPLICE, an important NASA payload that uses Lidar to safely land on other worlds.

VAN HORN, Texas — 1:00 p.m. Friday Update: Blue Origin once again scrubbed this morning’s launch due to a technical issue. A new launch date has not yet been announced.

7:00 a.m. Thursday Update: Blue Origin announced earlier this evening that Blue Origin would attempt another launch Friday, September 24 at 10:00 a.m. CDT

11:10 a.m. Thursday Update: Thursday’s launch attempt has been scrubbed, a new target launch date will be announced soon by Blue Origin.

9:45 a.m. Thursday Update: Blue Origin has delayed the launch until 11:40 a.m. CDT.

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