The Effort to Build the Mathematical Library of the Future

“In one crazy weekend I spent 12 hours a day [on it],” she said. “It was totally addictive.”

Other mathematicians talk about the experience the same way. They say working in Lean feels like playing a video game—complete with the same reward-based neurochemical rush that makes it hard to put the controller down. “You can do 14 hours a day in it and not get tired and feel kind of high the whole day,” Livingston said. “You’re constantly getting positive reinforcement.”

As Sébastien Gouëzel worked on defining a “smooth manifold” for mathlib, he had to balance specificity with flexibility.Courtesy of Sebastian Gouezel

Still, the Lean community recognizes that for many mathematicians, there just aren’t enough levels to play.

“If you were to quantify how much of mathematics is formalized, I’d say it’s way less than one-thousandth of one percent,” said Christian Szegedy, an engineer at Google who is working

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What can we learn from mathematical modeling

Human heart in space: What can we learn from mathematical modeling
Examples of pressures (P) and flow rates (Q) throughout the human body: on Earth (blue) and spaceflight (red) configurations. Credit: Politecnico di Torino

Human spaceflight has been fascinating man for centuries, representing the intangible need to explore the unknown, challenge new frontiers, advance technology and push scientific boundaries further. A key aspect of long-term human spaceflight is the physiological response and consequent microgravity (0G) adaptation, which has all the features of accelerated aging involving almost every body system: muscle atrophy and bone loss, onset of balance and coordination problems, loss of functional capacity of the cardiovascular system.


Research published recently in npj Microgravity and conducted by Caterina Gallo, Luca Ridolfi and Stefania Scarsoglio shows that human spaceflight reduces exercise tolerance and ages astronauts’ heart.

The study is based on a mathematical model which allowed to investigate some spaceflight mechanisms inducing cardiovascular deconditioning, that is the adaptation of the cardiovascular system

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NSF selects Sean Jones to head Mathematical and Physical Sciences directorate | NSF

News Release 20-009

NSF selects Sean Jones to head Mathematical and Physical Sciences directorate

Sean Jones

Sean Jones will serve as head of the NSF Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

September 29, 2020

The U.S. National Science Foundation has selected Sean Jones to serve as head of the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

Jones has worked as an innovator in the field of materials science; an advocate for inspiring and training the next generation of researchers and skilled workers; and a leader at NSF, committed to institutional improvements that serve the science and engineering community as well as the public. He has served with NSF for more than a decade, starting as a program director in 2009 and most recently heading the MPS Directorate as acting assistant director.

“Sean Jones’s expertise and experience as a leader both in academia and industrial research are rich perspectives that we need as we

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